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Official Organ of the 
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rjhe 


CHESS 

REVIEW 

Editors ; 

Harold Morton 
Israel A. Horowitz 


Vol. VIII, No. X Published Monthly January, 19-10 

< * * p *n - * » . i , « y * 

Published monthly by The Chess Review, 23 West 
43rd St.* New York* N. Y. Telephone Wisconsin 
7-3742. Domestic subscriptions; One Year $3,00; 
Two Years $5.30; Five Years $12.50; Six Months 
$1.75. Single copy 30 cee>, Foreign subscriptions; 
$3,50 per year except U. S. Possessions, Canada, Mex- 
ico, Central and South America. Single copy 35 cts. 

Copyright 1939 by The Chess Review 

"Entered as second-class matter January 25, 1937, at 
the post office at New York, N + Y, # under the Act 
of March 3 , 1879.” 


Western Renaissance of 1939 


While Europe struggles — toward that day 
which history has proven can most fittingly 
be acclaimed with the dubious jubilation 
"Another victory like this, and we are lost," 
the caravanserie of chess has been weather- 
vaned into a "Westward, Ho!" journey. 

Although the year 1939 neither crowned nor 
deposed champions of the patriciate of chess 
— -it marked significant political developments 
in its organization, while insofar as the per- 
sonal fortunes of its heroes were concerned, 
the fickle finger of fate was as unpredictable 
in its roving as the roulette croupier's ball. 

Salo Flohr, a disheartened last at A.V.R.O., 
after having won belated recognition as a 
proper challenger for Dr. Alekhines crown, 
contributed the finest come-back of the year 
by his January triumph in the Russian Masters 1 
Training Tournament— winning ahead of Rcsh- 
evsky, Lilienthal and Keres in a field of 
eighteen so strong that the hero of A.V.R.O,, 
Keres, with a pardonable let-down, tied for 
12th- 13th places. 

The North American Championship Tour- 
nament afforded Reuben Fine opportunity to 
run his tournament out-rankings of his Amer- 
ican arch-rival, Samuel Reshevsky, to four in 
their last five mutual entries, and another 
evidence that the 1-2-3 of American chess is 
Fine, Reshevsky and Horowitz. 

A sunlight- white milestone, indeed, was the 
unification of efforts for the promotion of 
chess as a recreative medium in America, 
brought about by the merger of the two feder- 
ations here — an orchid of the year to George 
Sturgis. 

The International Team Tournament went 


to zealous Argentine enthusiasts— whose tre- 
mendous success in staging the epochal event, 
paved the way for an unparalleled influx of 
talent into the Western Hemisphere, Marred 
by the unfortunately-compelled withdrawal of 
the English team, whose native patron is donor 
of the Hamilton -Russell trophy, and by the ab- 
sence of the champion American quintet, plus 
a flare of racial feuding due to the war— the 
event won by Germany, was nevertheless, the 
most colorful event of 1939. 

South America, having cornered the market 
of chess talent, made hay while Caissa's sons 
were shining, for an abundance of tournaments 
soon made it the best chess -game- producing 
region in the world. F.I.D.E. headquarters 
moved across the ocean, too. Even a world 
championship match was not too awesome to 
tackle. Capabianca at the turn of year 1938- 
1939 seemed well outside the "hat in the 
ring circle 1 ' after Alekhine s dictum of A.V. 
R.O. — "the failure of the two who have come 
last virtually eliminates them for some time 
to come from contests for the world title." 
A virtual agreement to play was announced in 
November. 

Clearly, 1939 has entrenched chess staunchly 
in the New World. May we not gratefully 
close upon our introductory key-note, happy 
in the knowledge that our support is for the 
game worthy of Ruskin’s "It is appointed for 
all to enjoy, even where few may achieve,” 
add where even the sternest conflict wins for 
its players the legend 

AW Hale, but Glory, made these chiefs 
contend 

And each brave foe was in his soul a friend. 

- - ’ : l 


THE PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE 


Greetings to chess players everywhere: — 

The United States Chess Federation wishes 
you all — wherever you may be — a very prosper- 
ous New Year! May each one of you in 1940 
have full measure of success in moving your 
chess pieces to the discomfiture of your op- 
ponents! 

With the beginning of this New Year I 
am glad, to report that our Federation is rapidly 
completing its organization* W. M* Parker 
Mitchell of Brookline, Mass*, and L. Walter 
Stephens of New York City have both accepted 
posts as vice-presidents of the U, S. C. F,, and 
I feel sure that all of you will join with me 
in extending a cordial greeting to Mr* Mitchell 
and Mr. Stephens upon joining the official 
"family.” 

Mr. Mitchell; as many of you know, spent 
many years of his life In the diplomatic ser- 
vice of the United States, retiring a short 
while ago in order to devote more time to 
other interests. He is a keen chess enthusiast, 
plays a strong game, likes correspondence chess 
(sometimes carries on 30 or 40 games at a 
time), and he will travel almost anywhere 
to play in a chess tournament. He is as well 
known in England as in the United States, 
You may find him seated at a. chess board in 
the Cafe de la Regence in Paris or you might 
meet him in some southern or western tour- 
nament, But when you do sit down with him 
over the chess board — beware, or he will beat 
you! He drew a recent game with Dr. Lasker 
and he has had many wins or draws against 
leading masters. Mr* Mitchell is going to or- 
ganize a campaign for new members for the 
U. S, C F. He wants 2,000 members and 
Em sure he will get them. Let's give Mr* 
Mitchell lots of help and lots of encouragement. 
Don't wait until he writes you or calls you on 
the phone! Send your $1 now to Ernest Olfe, 
Secretary, 1111 North 10th Street, Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin* You 11 get the year-book of the 
last tournament; you’ II have a vote in national 
chess affairs; you’ll receive a bulletin; and you 
will have the satisfaction of knowing that you 
have helped the cause of chess. 

Our other vice-president, Mr. Stephens, is 
the well-known secretary of the Manhattan 
Chess Club of New York and is remembered 
for the very able way in which he carried out 
the difficult and exacting duties of tournament 
director of the 1936 and 1938 U. S. Champion- 
ship Tournaments* He plays an excellent game 
of chess and he is noted for his enthusiasm 
and his organizing ability. When Mr* Stephens 



WARD M. PARKER MITCHELL 
United States Consul Retired 


undertakes a job, you can be sure it will be well 
done. He is now in Miami but he will re- 
turn to New York about February 1st, and 
will immediately inaugurate plans for the next 
United States Championship Tournament which 
will be held in the early spring, and in which 
Samuel Reshevsky will defend his title as 
champion* 

This gives you all the news of the United 
States Chess Federation and its activities to 
date. Your officers are working hard. We 
hope that you will show that you support our 
efforts by doing your bit and by sending in 
your $1 for membership* You 1 if find you get 
a lot for your money! Thank you very much. 

Cordially yours, 

GEORGE STURGIS 

President t United States Chess Federation 

Master < oi : the house— not chess) : “Meadows, 
go to the library at once and see if they have 
the book ‘How to Improve at Chess. 1 ” 

Meadows (not thinking) : “Yes, sir; and 
shall I say that it is urgent?” 

* * * 

Policeman: “Can you describe your assail- 
ant?” 

Kibitzer: “Describe him! What do you 
suppose 1 was doing when he hit me?” 









New Life for the Alekhine - Chatard Attack 

By V, J, Silich 


After tile moves 1 P K4, F-K3; 2 F-Q4, P-Q4; 
3 Kt-QB3, Et-KB £ ; 4 B-Kt5, B-K2; 5 P-K5, 
KKt-Q2; 6 F-KR4, F-KB3; 7 B-Q3, F-QB4 ; 
two theorists expressed the opinion that 
Black's system of defense was more than 
sufficient to cope with White’s aggressive de- 
signs, True, the .moves 6 , O-O; or 6 ♦ , . 

F-KR3; or 6 . * , P-QR3; or 6 , * * P-QR3 were 
found wanting, but inasmuch as 6 + . . P-KB3 
led to White’s downfall, the Alekhine-Chatard 
attack was condemned. ■ 

But this is far from/ the final word* An 
important point seemingly escaped the notice 
of the analysts, who inaccurately appraised the 
value of Black’s pawn structure. For in the 
variations developed after 7 Q-R5ch, his center 
Fawns tend to become targets for White's 
attacking force rather than the spearhead of 
any c o u nter- d e m o n str atio n . 

The following variations are worthy of note: 

7 Q-R5ch 

I 




m a mm 




i A 

4 



p, . 




i 























m 


7 . . . . P-KKt3 

S PxP BxP 

If 3 . . . PxQ?; 9 PxB, QxP; 10 BxQ, KxB; 
11 Kt-R3 and White enters the ending with a 
superior position. 

9 Q-K2 Q-K2 

9 . * . Kt-Bl fails because of 10 BxB, QxB; 
11 KtxP and 9 . , * Kt-Kt3 delays Black’s 
break in the center ( . . . P-QB4). 

ID Kt-B3 0-0 

11 0-0-0 Kt-K13 

For 12 KtxQP was“threatened + 

12 Q-K3 

And White’s positional advantage is obvious, 
as a direct assault of Black’s -castled K is 
threatened' — 'initiated by the mobile KRP, 

Thus Black's salvation must, of necessity, 
lie elsewhere. Accordingly two alternative 
basic systems -of defense require examination* 
l T 7 Q-R5ch K-Bl 

8 PxP KtxP 

If 8 * * , BxF; 9 Kt-R3, Q-Kl (to meet the 
threat of Kt-B4) ; 10 Q-Kt4 with advantage, 
as Black cannot counter with 10 , * * P-QB4 
■because of the powerful rejoinder 11 Kit-Kt5. 


E 11 . . * Kt-R3 ; 12 Kt-B4, F-K4 (12 . . . 
Kt-Kt3; 13 BxB, PxB; 14 Kt-R5 f Q-K2; 15 Q-B4 
wins); 13 Kt-Q6, Q-K2; 14 Kt-K6ch, K-K-tl; 15 
K1-E5, (>B2; 16 Kt-R6ch wins. 

9 Q-K2 ► >. , 

II 



1 


mm 
i 



4 



i 

m m. 





4 




i 





4 


















Now the main variations are worthy of con- 
sideration. 

(a) 9 ... . P-B4 

10 PxP Kt-B3 

11 0-0-0 Q-R4 

If 11 . . , BxP; 12 Kt-B3 to be followed by 13 
P-KKtS and B-R3 with lasting pressure on the 
KP, 

12 Kt-B3 P-KR3 

13 B-B4 BxP 

14 Kt-K5 .... 

With advantage to White. 

# * * # 

(b) 9 . . . , B-K15 

10 R-R3 P-B4 

11 PxP Kt-B3 

Or 11 * * . P-Q5; 12 0-0-0, P-K4; 13 R-Kt3, 
BxKt; 14 RxB, QT14; 15 RTi3 +. 

12 0-0-0 BxP 

The threat was 13 Kt-K4* 

13 Kt-B3 B-K2 

14 Kt-K5 .... 

W T ith advantage to White, 

4 * * * 

(c) 9 . . . . K-B2 

Attempting an artificial castling. 


(d> 


10 

Q 

i 

O 

i 

o 

R-K1 

11 

BxKt 

BxB 

12 

Q-R5ch 

K-Ktl 

13 

B-Q3 

P-KKt3 

14 

BxP 

PxB 

15 

QxPch 

K-R1 

16 

Kt-B3 

Q-K2 

17 

Kt-KKt5 

B-B1 

18 

R-Q3 and wins. 



* * £ * 


9 

aval 

P-KR3 

10 

B-Q2 

P-B4 

11 

Kt-B3 

Kt-B3 

12 

PxP 

BxP 


3 





4 


T he Chess Revih w 


13 0-0-0 . . . , 

Again with advantage to White, e.g., 13 
, , . KKt-KtE ; 14 Kt-Q4, KtxKt; 1-5 QxKt, P-K4; 
16 Q-Kt3, Q-Q3; 17 B-K3 winning a Pawn. 

II. 7 Q-R5ch P-K Kt3 

8 PxP KtxP 

9 Q-K2 . . „ . 


Ill 



In spite of Blank’s retention of the castling 
privilege White’s advantage is more pro- 
nounced than in Diagram II. For castling 
would invite an unwelcome and vicious Pawn 
assault against the vulnerable King position. 
Black does not retain even a measure of 
compensation for the weakening of his K side 
Pawn phalanx. 

(a) 9 . . - - 

10 Kt-B3 

11 Q-O-O 

12 PxP 

13 P-KKt3! 

With advantage to White. 

if; # + 

(b) 9 . . , , 

10 PxP 

11 0 - 0-0 

If 11 . . . Q-R4; 12 Q-Kt5 
retain the Pawn plus* Or 
refuted by 12 KtxP. 

12 Kt-B3 Q-R4 

With a position, similar to that in variation 
(a). If 12 , . . B-Q2 ; 13 P-KKtS, R-Kl; 11 
B-R3 , BxP; 15 Kt-K6 or 15 P-KR5+. 


9 

■ ■ m * 

P-KR3 

10 

B-B4 

P-B4 

11 

Kt-B3 

Kt-B3 

12 

QKt-Kt5 

Q-R4ch 

13 

P-B3 

PxP 

14 

KKtxP 

KtxKt 

15 

KtxKt 

K~B2 

16 

P-KKt3 to be 

followed by B-R3I 


A summation discloses that the attack initi- 
ated with 7 Q-R5ch and developed in the fore- 
going analyses, apparently casts a serious doubt 
upon the validity of the move 6 * * * P-KB3, 
and to this extent constitutes an important 
contribution toward the rehabilitation of the 
Alekhine-Chatard Attack, 

(Translated from S c hack matt by J*K.) 


0-0 

P-B4 

Kt-B3 

Q-R4 


P-B4 

Kt-B3 

0-0 

is sufficient to 
11 . . , BxP is 


Game Studies 


The following is the eighth game of the 
match for the championship of Holland. It 
was contested with keen enthusiasm in spite 
of the fact that the final outcome of the match 
had already been determined. 


QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 


(Notes by Dr. Max Euwe) 

Dr. M. Euwe S. Landau 

White Black 


1 P-Q4 P-Q4 

2 P-QB4 P-QB3 

3 Kt-KB3 Kt-B3 

4 PxP . . . „ 


The so-called exchange variation, innocent 
in appearance but loaded with dynamite, 

4 . . , , PxP 

5 Kt-B3 Kt-B3 

6 B-B4 P-K3 


The development of the QB is not satisfac- 
tory; e.g., 6 . . . B-B4; 7 P-K 3, P-QR3 ; S Kt- 
K5, R-Bl; 9 P-KKM!, with a good attack as 
in the game Alekhine -Euwe, Avro, 1938* 

7 P-K3 B-K2 

8 B-Q3 0-0 

9 0-0 .... 


9 P-KR3, provided a flight square for the 
Bishop, and avoided the complications which 
now follow. 

9 . . . . . Kt-KR4 

10 B-K5 .... 


The best square for the Bishop, for White 
need not fear 10 * * , KtxB-; after which 11 
PxKt, Black’s KKt cannot retreat without 
Black creating weaknesses. 

10 ... * P-B3 

11 Kt-KKt5 .... 

Threatening 11 QxKt among other things. 

11 . * . . Q-K1 

Acceptance of either piece would lead to 
disaster; 1.1 . . , PxKt; 12 QxKt, P-KK13?; 

13 BxP or if 12- . . * P-KR3 ; 13 BxP, or if 11. 
, . . PxB; 12 QxKt, BxKt; 13 QxPch, K-B2; 

14 B-KtGch, K-B3 (14 . * . K-K2; 15 QxPch, 
K-Q3; 16 Kt-Kt5 male); 15 PxPch, KtxP; 16 
P-B4, or 12 . , . P-KR3 ; 13 Q-Kt6, BxKt; 14 
Q-R7ch, K-B2 ; 15 B-Kt6ch, K-B3; 16 P-B4 (or 
also 16 PxPch, etc.), PxBP; 17 PxP, B-R5 
and In both cases White has a winning attack. 

Instead of the text move 11 * . . P-KKt3 
deserves consideration. White might then con- 
tinue 12 KtxRF, PxB ; 13 KtxR, QxKt; 14 BxP 
and retain excellent chances. 


12 Kt-Kt5 


Apparently refuting Black's last move, as 
White now threatens to force Black to abandon 
his Knight with Kt-QB7 . 


12 

P ^ p i i ■ 

PxKt 

The only move. 

13 Kt-B7 

Q-B2 

14 KtxR 

P-K Kt3 

15 KLB7 

P-QR3 

Preventing Kt-Kt5. 

16 R-Bl 

KtxB 



J ANUARYj 1 9' 4 0 


5 


If 16 ; ♦ , B“Ql; there 

follows 17 KtxRP! 

PxKt; IS RxKt, or if 17 . 

. KtxB: 1? PxKt, 

.PxKt; 19 RxB. Attempting to capture the 
Knight with B-Q2 and RTJ1 fails because of 

17 Q-K13. 


17 PxKt 

Q-Kt2 

Black hopes for complications; 18 P-KKtl, 

QxP; 19 PxKt, B Q3, 


18 Kt-R8 

QxP 

19 Kt-Kt6 

B-Q3 

The Knight is emancipated. In the interim 
Black has picked up a Pawn, which partially 

compensates for the loss 

of the exchange. 

20 P-KKt3 

B-B2 

21 KtxB 

RxKt 

22 Q-Kt3 

R-Ktl 

23 R-B2 

Kt,B3 

24 KR-QB1 

KLK1 

25 P-K4 

* * ■ B 

A temporary Pawn sacrifice which forces 
open the file so that White's pieces soon will 

be able to penetratb. 


26 

■“ V » 4 ■ ■ 

PxP 

26 R-B5 

Q.Q3 

27 BxKP 

K-B2 

2S R (B5)-B3 

K-K2 

29 R-Q3 

Q.Kt3 

If 29 . . . Q-K4 there 
threatening BxKKtP, 

follows 30 K-K3, 

30 Q-B3 

P-K4 


12 0 0 R-Q1 

13 Kt~K5 RxB? 

A faulty combination. However, it is not 
easy for Black to develop his pieces: e.g. 13 
* . , E-Q2; 14 BxKt, RxB; .15 BxPch, KxB; 16 
Q-K5ch, K-Ktl ; 17 QxPch, K-R2; IS KtxB' 


Landau 



Euwe 


14 P-Q Kt4 1 

If 14 BxKt, R-Q4; 15 BxB, RxKt; 16 ExQ, 
vRxQ* 

1 4 * * * * Q-Q4 

15 P-Q641 


Otherwise the Q could reach KR8 with good 
effect. 

31 Q-Q2 

Winning a Pawn due io the double threat 
of QxPch and R-Q7ch. 

31 . , , . Kt-B3 

32 QxP K-K3 

With the counter-threat 33 . . . QxPch; 34 
KxQ, KtxBch, 

33 B-Kt2 B,Q3 

34 B-R3ch K-B2 

35 R-KB3 Resigns 

For after 35 * > , B-K2; 36 QxKP, .R-Kl; 37 
R-B7 Black is defenseless. 

Translated from the Haag sc he Co u rant by J t B,S, 


Amsterdam, October, 1939 
FRENCH DEFENSE 

(Notes by Dr. Max Euwe) 

Dr. M. Euwe S, Landau 

White Black 


If 15 RxKt, R-Q7 ; 16 Q-R5, P-KKL3; 17 Q- 
Kt5?, P-KR3; 13 KtxKtP, QxQ; 19 KtxBch, 
K-Bl; 20 BxQ, PxB; 21 KtxB, RxKt and Black 
must at least regain his P, 


15 

* m m m. 

Q K51 

19 

RxR 

KtxR 

16 

QxQ 

KtxQ 

20 

R-Q1 

PxKt 

17 

BxB 

R-Q7 

21 

RxKt 

K-B2 

18 

QR-Q1 

P-B3 

22 

B-Q6 

B-Q2 

22 t , , 

P-K5 is of 

no consequence 

as the 

P must fall. 





23 

BxP 


B-K1 



£4 

R-Q4 


P-KKt3 


24 . . . 

P-KK14 ! offered 

better chances. 

25 

P-KR4 

R-B1 

34 

R-B4 

R-K1 

26 

P.Kt4 

P-KR4 

35 

R-B6 

P-Kt4 

27 

P-B3 

P-QR3 

36 

P-B5 

B-Q4 

28 

K-B2 

B-B3 

37 

P-R3 

R-Q1 

29 

K-K3 

R-KKtl 

38 

RxKP 

BxR 

30 

K-B4 

K-K2 

39 

KxB 

R-QR1 

31 

P-Kt5 

R-QB1 

40 

P-B6 

R-KIch 

32 

B.QSch 

K-B2 

41 

K-Q7 

K-B2 

33 

K-K5 

K-Kt2 

42 

P-B7 

Resigns 


“Die SchaakwerelcV* 


1 P-K4 

2 P-Q4 

3 Kt-Q2 

4 KtxP 


P-K3 5 Kt-KB3 K Kt-B3 

P-Q4 6 KtxKtch KtxKt 

PxP 7 B-Q3 

Kt-Q2 


Hastings, January, 1936 
Premier Reserves Tournament 


7 Kt-K5 would be met by , . . Q Ql! 

7 , . * . B-K2 

8 Q-K2 0-0 


CARO-K AN N DEFENSE 

(Notes by Dr. R, Rey Ardid) 
Champion of Spain 


3 


P-QKt3 1 is 
9 B-KKt5 


preferable, 

P-B4 


Now 9 . , . P-QKt3 
RxKt, BxB; 1.1 Q-K4 ! 

10 PxP 

11 P-B3 


fails on account of 10 


Q-R4ch 

QxBP 


J. Mieses 

Dr. R. Rey Ardid 

White 

Black 

1 P-K4 

P-Q B3 

2 P-Q4 

P“Q4 

3 KLQB3 

PxP 

4 KtxP 

B-B4 

5 Q-B3 

i p ■ i 



6 


The Chess Review 


An unusual move involving a sacrifice. 5 
Kt-Kt3 Is usual* 

5 . . . , P-K3 

By 5 Q Q4; 6 B-Q3, BxKt; 7 BxB, QxQP; 8 
K1K2, White obtains the advantage of two 
Bishops, and this, coupled with his superior 
development is ample compensation for the 
Pawn minus. 


6 B-K3 

7 KtxKtch 

8 0 - 0-0 
9 P-KR3 


Kt-B3 

PxKt 

R-Ktll 

Q-Q4! 


Compelling the exchange of Queens, after 
which Black's forces, particularly the rooks, 
become very active* 

10 QxQ BPxQ 

11 P-KKt4 B-K5 

12 P-KB3 B-Kt3 

13 Kt-K2 Kt-B3 

14 Kt-B4 P-QR3 

14 * * .B-R3 fails because of 15 KtxQF! win- 
ning a Pawn. 

15 P-KR4 .... 

15 KtxB is preferable. 

J. Mieses 



Dr, R, Rey Ardid 


15 ... . R-B1 ! 

16 P-R5 BxBP 

Black will obtain three pawns for his piece 
and good chances in the ensuing endgame. 

17 KxB KtxPch 

18 K-Ktl KtxP 

19 B-K2 Kt«K4 

20 KR-Ktl B.Q3 

21 P-R6 .... 

21 R-QB1 was indicated. The advanced 
Pawn becomes weak. 

21 ... * K-K2 

22 Kt-R5 B-B4I 

Further weakening the KRP by eliminating 
White's QB* 

23 BxB ■ RxB 

24 Kt-Kt7 R(B4)-B1 

To counter £5 P-Kt5 with 25 * . . PxP; 26 
RxKtP, for then comes 26 . . . P-B3 followed 
by , . . . Kt-B2 and , . . KtxRP without fear Of 
27 Kt-B5eh as the KR is protected, 

25 P-Kt3? . « ♦ • 

A strategical error which permits the Black 
QR to penetrate. 


25 ... » R-B6 

26 R (Ktl)-Bl R-K6 ! 

26 . . . R-R6 would be met by 27 RR1. 

27 R-B2 R-R6 

28 Kt-R5 KtxP 

Clearly not 28 ♦ . . R-Kt3 because of 29 
KUB4. 

29 BxKt RxB 

30 KtxP R-Kt3 

31 R (Q1 )-KBl .... 

After 31 KtxRP, R(R6)xRP the Kt is lost 
without compensation, 

31 ... . R(R6)xRP 

32 KtxQPch .... 

There is no good alternative, and the text- 
move is not without chances* Eiaek's advan- 
tage is minimised, and the endgame is indeed 
difficult. 

32 ... . PxKt 

33 RxPch K-Q3 

34 RxKtP R-R7 

35 R-Kt6ch K-K4 

If 35 , . . K-B4; 36 RxR, PxR; 37 R-B6 and 

White recovers the Pawn. 

36 R-KIch K-B4 

37 R-KBIch K-K5 

38 R-KIch .... 

With the Black King well posted, -there is 
no danger in 38 RxR, PxR; 39 R-B6, which is 
well met by 39 . . ,F-Kt4; 40 RxP, P-Kt5, etc, 

38 ... . K-Q6 

Unfortunate! Correct was 38 . , . K-B6I 
with two chief continuations: 39 RxR. PxR; 
40 R-K6, R-K Kt7 1 or 39 RxR (39 R-KBlch, R- 
KE7), PxR; 40 R-KKtl, R-KKt7 with an easy 
win in both cases. After the textmove the 
outcome is problematical. 

39 RxR PxR 

40 R-Ktl I .... 

40 R-K6, R-KKt7! was the expected play. 
Black seals his next move. 


40 , 


R-R3 


Probably offering the only chance. If 40 
, * * K-R6; 41 R-Kt3eh, K-Q7; 42 RxP, F-Q5 

43 RxP, P-Q6; 44 R-Q6, K-R6 (44 , . , K-K6 
45 R“K(>ch, K-Q5; 46 R-Q6ch, K-K5; 47 P-R4) 
45 R-QB6ch, draws. Or 44 , . . K-K7; 45 R- 
KGch, K-Q8 ; 46 P-R4, R K7; 47 R-Q6, P-Q7; 48 
R-KR6 draws* 

41 K-Kt2 P-Q5 

42 P-R4? .... 

R 

Until now Mieses has expertly managed the 
defense. Here he slips. A better plan was 42 
R-Kt3ch! (42 P-Kt.4?, K-E5), K-K5 (or 42 , . . 
K-K7 ; 43 F-Kt4I, K-B7; 44 R-Kt4! f K-K6; 45 
R-Kt3ch, K-B5; 46 R-Q3, K-K5; 46 R-KKt3 ar- 
riving at the main variation); 43 P-Rt4 1 , K-B4; 

44 K-Kt3 (44 R-Q3?, R-R5! wins), P-Kt4 (if 44 
* , , K-B5; 45 R-Q3!); 45 K-B4, R-R5; 46 K-Q3, 
K-E5; 47 R-Ktl and it is not clear how Black 
can win. 

After the textmove Black obtains a power- 
ful -onslaught by offering a Pawn, 


42 ... , R-R7ch 

43 K-R3 . . . . 

Other moves fail to the reply 43 . . 

43 ... . K-B7 

44 RxP P-R4! 


. K-B6. 


January, i 9 4 Q 


7 


45 R-Kt5 

Neither 45 F-KU, R-R6ch followed by PxP, 
nor 45 E-QB6eh, K-Kt8 ! threatening mate will 
help White! 

45 ... . R-R6 

46 R-Kt2ch .... 

The alternatives were: 46 R-QB=6ch P R-QB6 
and 46 RxP p RxFeh; 47 K-R2 P P-Q6 P winning 
easily. 

46 ... . K-B6 

47 R*Kt8 , . , * 

Best! After 47 R-Kt6, P-Q6; 48 RxP, P-Q7; 
49 R-Q5, R-Q6; 50 R-QB5ch, K-Q5 White is lost. 

47 * . . . P-Q6 

48 R-QBSch K-Q5 

Better than 48 . . . K-Q7; 49 P-Kt4! which is 
now impossible because of P-Q7ch and R-Q6! 

49 K-Kt2 

After 49 R-Q8eh, K-K6; 50 R-K8ch„ K-R7; 51 
R-KBSch, E-B6! 

49 . . * . K K6 

A blunder upon which Mieses fails to cap- 
italize, The correct continuation was 49 „ , , 
R-E4 ! ; 50 K-Bl {50 R-B4ch f K-K6; 51 K-B3, 
P-Q7 ; 52 K-B2, R-R8), R-QB4ch; 51 RxR, KxR; 
52 K-Q2, K-Q5; 53 K-Bl, K-B6 and wins. Or 
49 . , * R-R4 ! ; 50 R-Q3ch P K-K6! <50 . * , R- 
Q4?; 51 R-KR8 draws); 51 K-B3, R-QB4ch t 52 
K-Kt£, E-B7eh! (52 , , , P-Q7?; 53 R-KSch, K- 
B7; 54 R-KBgch, K-KS; 55 R-KSch, K-QS; 56 
R-Q7 draws) 53 K-Ktl (53 K-R3, P-Q7, etc.), 
R-KR7 ! 54 R-Q7 (54 R-K8ch, K-Q5; 55 R-QB8. 
R-H8ch; 56 K-Kt2, P-Q7; 57 E-QSch, K-K6; 5S 
K-E2, R-QB&eh followed by P-Q8(Q), R-R8ch; 
59 K-Kt2, P-R7 ; 60 R-K7ch (60 K-B2, R- 

QB8ch) p K-B5 and wins, 

50 R-KSch.? .... 

White is able to draw here by 50 K-B3I K- 
K7; 51 R-QB 1 1 E-K6; 52 R-Q7, R-Kl (52 . . , 
P-Q7ch; 53 K-B2 and the Pawn is lost); 53 
P-Kt4! (53 HxP??, E-QB8ch wins the Rook), 
PxPch ; 54 KxP p P-Q7; 55 P-R5 p P-QS(Q); 56 
RxQ, KxR; 57 K-Kt5, 

50 ... , K-Q7 

51 R-K5 R~R8I 

Now comes a pretty and well calculated man- 
euver, 

52 RxP K-K6 

53 K-B3 .... 

53 R'Q5 P P-Q7 ; 54 K-B2, R-QBSch; 55 K-Kt2, 
F-Q8{Q); 56 RxQ, RxR; 57 P-Kt4 is also in- 
sufficient because of K-Q5, 

53 i . i i P-Q7 

54 R-K5ch K-B5 

Attacking the Rook! The rest requires no 


comment. 

55 R-Q5 

P-QS(Q) 

62 K-Kt6 

K-Q3 

56 

RxQ 

RxR 

63 P-R6 

R-QKt6ch 

57 

K* B4 

K-K4 

64 K-R7 

K-B2 

58 

K-B5 

R-QB8ch 

65 K*R8 

R-Ktlch 

59 

K-Kt6 

R-QKt8 

66 K-R7 

R-Kt3 

60 

61 

P-R5 

K-B7 

RxPch 

R-QR6! 

Resigns 



An uncommonly interesting and instructive 
game. 


White bites and fleas. 

Black scratches out a draw , 

New York State Championship Tournament 

August, 1939 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 

I. Chernev A, $. Denker 

White Black 


1 P-Q4 

Kt*KB3 

21 B-Q6 

BxB 

2 Kt-KB3 

P-Q4 

22 RxB 

KtxP 

3 P*QB4 

P-K3 

23 R-Q3 

P-KI3 

4 Kt-B3 

QKt-Q2 

24 Q-K2 

Q-Kt5 

5 B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

25 R-K3 

Q-R6 

6 P*K3 

B-K2 

26 Q-B2 

R-B5 

7 Q-B2 

0-0 

27 R-Ktl 

P-B4 

8 R-B1 

PxP 

28 Q-Q3 

Kt-Q3 

9 BxP 

P-B4 

29 P-R3 

K-B2 

10 PxP 

KtxP 

30 R(Kt)-K1 

R-K5 

11 0-0 

P-Kt4 

31 P-B3 

RxR 

12 B-K2 

B-Kt2 

32 QxR 

QxP 

13 KR-Q1 

Q-B2 

33 QxP 

Q-B5 

14 P-QKt4 

QR-B1 1 

34 Q-K5 

Q-Q4 

If 14 . . . 

QKt-Q2; 

35 QxQ 

PxQ 

15 Kt-Q5! 


36 R-R1 

K*K3 

15 PxKt 

BxKt 

37 RxP 

P-B5 

16 BxB 

QxP 

38 K-B2 

K-K4 

17 B-B4 

P-Kt5 

39 K-K2 

Kt-B4 

18 B-Kt7 

PxKt 

40 R-R7 

P-R3 

19 BxR 

RxB 

Drawn 


20 P-K4 

Q-B5 




Spelling Trouble! 

White f uniting to be hit by a pillow , 
Is hit by a pillar instead \ 

British Chess Federation Tournament 
Bournemouth! August, 1939 
GRUNFELD DEFENSE 



G, Abrahams 

S, Flohr 


White 


Black 

1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

14 Kt-KKt5 

Kt*B4 

2 

P-QB4 

P-KKt3 

15 KR-Q1 

P-KR3 

3 

Kt.QB3 

P-Q4 

16 Kt-R3 

Kt-Q4 

4 

B-84 

B-Kt2 

17 KtxKt 

BxKt 

5 

P-K3 

0-0 

18 B-R6 

Q-R5 

6 

Kt-B3 

P-QB4 

19 Kt-B4 

BxB 

7 

B-K5 

QPxP 

20 QxB 

Q R-Q1 

8 

BxP 

Kt-B3 

21 KtxB 

RxKt 

9 

0-0 

PxP 

22 Q-B7 

KtxP 

10 

PxP 

P-Kt3 

23 QxRP 

KR-Q1 

11 

Q-K2 

B-Kt2 

24 R-K1 

Kt*B6ch 

12 

P-QR3 

P*K3 

25 PxKt 

R-KKt4ch 

13 

QR-B1 

KLK2 

Resigns 



Swedish No, 1 player, G, Stahlberg, out- 
distances his nearest rival for second place 
at the Tournament of Bad Harzberg, A 
machine-gun staccato of pointed, penetrating 
moves find their mark, 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 
(Cambridge Springs Defense) 

(Notes by Dr, Max Euwe) 

C. Ahues G. Stahlberg 

White Black 

1 P-Q4 P-Q4 1 4 B-Kt5 R,B3 

2 Kt-KB3 Kt-KB3 5 Kt-G3 QKt-Q2 

3 P-B4 P'K3 6 P-K3 Q.R4 

The choice of openings is much a matter of 


8 


The Chess Review 


fashion. Ten years ago the Cambridge Springs 
Defense drew 1 the center of attention and was 
often essayed. Today its appearance is rare. 
Its validity is still a moot question. 

7 Kt-Q2 B„Kt5 

8 Q-B2 0-0 

9 B-K2 P-K4 

This enterprising move was first introduced 
in the game Bogotubow-Grunfeld, Mahrigoh- 
Ostrau, 1924. 

10 PxKP Kt-K5 

The point of the P sacrifice. Black achieves 
freedom of development and counter pi ay, 

11 Kt (Q2)xKt PxKt 

12 QR-B1 . . . . 

But this does not seem to be an improvement 
on the general procedure: 12 0-0, BxKt; 13 
PxB, KtxP ; 14 QxP, P-B3; 15 B-R4 (not 15 
B-B4 because of * . * B-B4! winning the Q), 
B-K3; with about even chances. 

The idea of the text move is to avoid a 
doubled P on QB3, but it soon becomes ap- 
parent that it was important not to have de- 
layed castling. 


Stahlberg 



Ahues 


25 . . . . BxP! 

For after 26 QxB, R-QSch! winning the Q. 
Now Black penetrates on the Q file, 

26 P-B3 R-Q6 

27 QxQ 


12 , . . KtxP 

13 B-B4 . . , . 

Now 0-0 is temporarily thwarted by the 
threat of , * „ Kt-B6oh followed by . , . QxB. 

13 ■ . . . Kt-Q6ch ! 

Not speculating to any extent , for Black 
may recover the QRP in any event, 

14 BxKt PxB 

15 QxP . B-KB4 

16 Q-K2 

Of course not 16 F-K4, BxP! 

16 , „ . , KR-Q1 

Preventing 17 0-0 because of , . ( B-Q6. 

17 P-QR3 B-KB1 

18 Q-F15 . . , . 

For w T ant of a better continuation. 18 P-K4 
is still out of the question, and 18 R-Qi is met 
by . . . RxRcli followed by . . . li-Ql and . . . 
B-Q6 t tying the K to the center, where he is 
subject to any number of threats, 

18 , . . . P-KKt3 

19 Q-Kt5 G-Kt3 

20 P-K4 , , ■ . . 

If 20 0-0, then . . * QxKtP with advantage. 


20 ... . B-K3 

21 B-K5 .... 

Threatening 22 Q-E6E 

21 ... . B-Kt2 

22 BxB KxB 

23 Q-K5ch K-Ktl 

24 Kt-K2 .... 

In a rather precarious position, White's de- 
fense has been- stoic. Here, however, he courts 
danger. Simpler was 24 Kt-R4 leading to 
equality, after , T . Q-Q5, 


24 . , , , Q-Kt6! 

White no longer is able to maintain the P 
plus. 

25 Q~B3 

Nearly sufficient, but , , , 


Again, If 27 QxB, R-QSch to be followed -by 
the exchange of Qs, and the capture of the 
KR. 

27 . . , . BxQ 

28 K-B2 

28 Kt-B4, R-Q3 ; 29 R-Bl, QR-Ql; 30 R-KB2 
offered -better drawing chances, 

28 . , . . R-Q7 

29 K-K3 

Hoping for 29 , , . RxP to which 30 R-QKtl 
would be a powerful rejoinder, 

29 ... , QR-Q1 33 RxR RxR 

30 KR.K1 R(Q1 )-Q6ch 34 KhQ4 P-QB4 

31 K-B4 RxKtP Resigns 

32 R-QKtl R (Q6)-Q7 

Perhaps somewhat early, but in view of 
Black’s superiority, further resistance is futile. 


A little shtlelah persuasion on the King* 

Manhattan Chess Club Championship 
December, 1939 
FOUR KNIGHTS GAME 


E, S, Jackson 

White 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

3 

Kt-B3 

Kt-B3 

4 

B-Kt5 

B-Kt5 

5 

0-0 

0-0 

6 

P-Q3 

P-Q3 

7 

B- Kt5 

BxKt 

8 

PxB 

Q-K2 

9 

R-K1 

Kt-QI 

10 

P-Q4 

Kt-K3 

11 

B-QB1 

P-B3 

12 

B-B1 

Q-B2 

13 

P-Kt3 

P-B4 

14 

P-Q6 

Kt-QI 

15 

P-B4 

Kt-KI 

16 

Kt~R4 

P-K Kt3 

17 

P-B4 

PxP 

18 

PxP 

P-B3 

19 

R-Ktl 1 

Kt-Kt2 

20 

R-Kt3i 

Kt-B2 


J. Feldman 

Black 


21 

R-Kt3! 

R«K1 

22 

B-QKt2 

Q-K2 

23 

KtxP 

PxKt 

24 

RxP 

Kt-K4 

25 

PxKt 

B PxP 

26 

R-K3 

Q-R5 

27 

R(K3)-Kt3 

R-K2 

28 

Q-B3 

R-KB2 

29 

Q- Kt2 

Q-R2 

30 

RxP 

B-Q2 

31 

BxP 

QR-KB1 

32 

RxKtch 

RxR 

33 

BxR 

R-B2 

34 

B-B3ch 

K-B1 

35 

R-B6 

RxR 

36 

BxR 

B-K1 

37 

P-K 5 

B-Kt3 

38 

B-Q3 

BxB 

39 

PxB 

Q-R3 

40 

Q-Kt7ch 

Resigns 


January, 1940 


9 


Muscle Over Mind 

Using less imagination than a Queen odds 
player, anyone could see where Cauliflower- 
Face Flaherty might have been the inspiration 
for Woodrow Wilson's macaronic contribution 
to poetry. 

"For beauty l am no star; 

There are others more handsome by jar; 

But my face l don't mind it. 

For / am behind it. 

If s the fellow in front gets the jar T' 

Flaherty bore the unique distinction of hav- 
ing beaten at chess on the two-inch squares 
every fighter at GilhooJey’s Gymnasium — and 
was undiscomfited, if not undeco rated, by the 
fact that each one had with equal efficiency and 
willing alacrity done the same thing for him 
in a certain twenty- foot square. 

Perhaps this is why he sought employment 
in the more genteel art of chess annotating. 
Maybe that was why his thoughts were a trifle 
muddled — but then, this handicap has been 
no hindrance to others, as many an analysis 
bears mute attest. So, Cauliflower- Face Fla- 
herty wanted to make his modest bid for 
Pulitzer consideration. Despite ten reitera- 
tions that he'd build something less than a 
home in the country on his share of the gate 
receipts of a chess game, he remained undis- 
cou raged. 

Here he is — take him away, America, 

* sfc * 

Ladeez and Gentulmen, in this corner, 
wearin’ White trunks, is the Polish piledriver, 
Ripper Rodzinsky — and in this corner, wearin 1 
Black is the Franco-Russian Tamerlane of the 
Chessboard, champeen of the wurrld, Doctor 
(Black-pill) Alekhine, 

15-Round Bout — Paris, August, 1913 
Rodzinsky Alekhine 

White Clack 

1 P-K4 P-K4 

Rushin' to the middle of the ring is just 
gallery stuff, and only keeps the leather-hided 
cash customers* with ya, so long as you’re 
perpendicular, and in there flailin' like a 
Dutch windmill. 

2 Kt-KBS Kt-QB3 

3 B-B4 P-Q3 

Coverin' up his mid-section. It’s a Fill-the- 

Doors Defense, they tell— which probably ain't 
got nuthin' to do with a full house in poker, 
but may mean a capacity crowd or somethin 1 
in chess. 

If you don't tike my style, remember I'm 
only gettin' my share of the gate on annatatiiT 
with no extra cut to explain names from the 
fifteenth century. 

4 P-B3 B-KKt5 


5 Q-Kt3 Q-Q2 

6 Kt-Kt5 Kt,R3 

7 KtxKBP .... 

Jabbin* furiously, the Ripper drives the 
champ into the ropes. In a carnival circuit 
he'd have some preliminary bum in some 
ringsider's lap in two rounds* but the champ, 
who is no camp stool, don't fold up so easy. 

7 . . . . KtxKt 

3 BxKtch QxB 

9 QxKtP K*Q2! 

The champ seems to reel and stagger help- 
lessly. It's an old gag *cuz a blind man can see 
he ain't glassy-eyed a-tall— but Rodzinsky 
wades in, 

10 QxR .... 

A terrific smash, thinks the crowd, which 
except for a few of the boys in the trade, can’t 
see what's holdin' the Champ up — and hustles 
to get. In their cheerin' before the towel -toss. 



10 ... . Q-B5I 

The crowd is in the aisles yellin' King VII, 
whoever he is— r only heard of Henry the 
Eighth. 

11 P-B3 .... 

This loco is all attack and no defense. 

11 ... . BxP 

The champ sails in, cool, like an ice-cutter. 

12 PxB Kt-Q5 

After which While's grunt can he heard 
in the last row. 

13 P-Q3 QxQP 

14 PxKt . , . , 

Reckless!? This game guy would dive off 
the Tower of Babel into a bucket of water, 

14 ... , B-K2 

Goaded like this, a paralytic grasshopper 
would swap kicks with a burro— so the Ripper 
staggers In, as wide open as the Grand Canyon. 

15 QxR B-R5 mate 

After which elegant piece of face-bashing, 
White’s features can only be picked by guess- 
work. 


This, we fear, will be the last contribution 
by C-F. F. A percentage cut of the gate at a 
chess game runs somewhat under world's 
heavyweight fight receipts. We knew it. 
Flaherty does — now. 


Famous Last Round Tourney Thrills 

By Paul Hugo Little 


TARRASCH-WAL BRODT, VIENNA, 1898 

The Vienna 1898 Tournament was one of 
the greatest events in chess history. Held in 
conjunction with the fifty-year jubilee of the 
reign of Franz Joseph of Austria, its entry 
lacked only Lasker and Charousek, and perhaps 
Teidimann and Bardeleben, of the chess stars 
of that day. 

The tournament was a double- round event, 
with twenty players participating. One of 
them, A, Schwarz, dropped out after the 7th 
round, and his score was annulled. So each 
player had thirty-six hard games to play before 
his place could be determined. It was truly 
a chess marathon! 

Handsome prizes were provided as incentive 
for the players. Two hot summer months — 
July and August— of grueling chess lay before 
them, 

Much regret was expressed over the absence 
of Lasker and Charousek, the latter already 
suffering from the malady that was to bring 
him to an early grave. Still, the great rivals 
Stein itz and Tchigorin were entered in the 
lists to joust against combatants; and Tarrasch 
was there, the favorite because of his magni- 
ficent tournament record. Pillsbury, the hero 
of Hastings, sought another first prize. There 
was Blackburne and Burn, the two English 
veterans, Schiffers, Alapin, Maroczy, Marco, 
Schlechter, Lipke, and Walbrodt, The Amer- 
ican, Sho waiter, compatriot of Pillsbury, was 
to uphold the standards of a country still 
unrecognized by European centers. 

The fight was expected to be a fierce one, 
and so it proved. After nineteen rounds and 
the first half of the tourney were completed, 
Pillsbury and Tarrasch were in first place with 
equal scores of 15, Janowski was a close third 
with I31/ 2t and Steinitz, despite his age and 
the despair of having lost his title to Lasker, 
was a fine fourth with 1 2 - Tchigorin had 
1 2, Alapin 1 1.1/, Lipke 1 1 , and Burn, Maroczy, 
and Schlechter, i 01/ each. Pillsbury had beaten 
Tarrasch in their game in the fourteenth round, 
for the Doctor's only loss, while Pillsbury 
had lost to Tchigorin and Maroczy. 

After 24 rounds, Tarrasch \s score was 19 
and Pillsbury's 18^/, with Steinitz in third 
place with Hi. After the 26th round. Pills- 
bury led with 20, Tarrasch was second with 
191 / 2 - Janowski was third with 17, and 
Tchigorin was fourth with 1 61/, Steinitz having 
lost two games to hold fifth place with 16. 
After 32 rounds, Pillsbury continued to lead 


by half a point with 241/, Tarrasch had 24, 
and Janowski and Steinitz were tied with 21. 
Tchigorin was far behind in fifth place with 

It was obvious that Pillsbury and Tarrasch 
w r erc destined to battle it out for the chief 
prize. In the 33rd round, Tarrasch scored 
over Pillsbury, avenging his loss in the 14th 
round, and took the lead, only to lose to 
Janowski in the next round, as Pillsbury won. 
In the 35th round both won, and in the 36 th 
round Tarrasch finally overhauled Pillsbury 
by drawing against Tchigorin, while Pillsbury 
was losing to Bum in 91 moves. In the 37th 
and semi-final round Pillsbury beat Trenchard 
and Tarrasch beat Alapin, 

And so Tarrasch and Pillsbury came into the 
38th and last round on Monday, July 25th 
with equal scores of 27 l /, Janowski was 
third with 251/, and Steinitz was fourth with 
24, a magnificent performance considering his 
bitter disappointments. Pillsbury was paired 
with Baird and Tarrasch with Walbrodt. Ob- 
viously, Pillsbury's chances were better. He 
soon obtained an advantage with White in 
a Queen's Gambit Declined, won two pawns 
on his 27th move, and scored the point in 52 
moves. 

So it was up to Tarrasch, He had White, 
and played a Queen's Gambit, which Walbrodt 
declined. Walbrodt lost time with a knight 
maneuver seeking to exchange, and draw, 
and Tarrasch soon had a bind. 

He increased the pressure. Walbrodt fought 
ably, but Tarrasch' s keen positional judgment 
gave him no chance, and after 52 moves 
Tarrasch had won to tie with Pillsbury. A 
playoff match was won by Tarrasch, 2-1, 1 
draw, but this was anti-climactic. 

The game with Walbrodt, which follows, 
was the Doctor's great effort. 


QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 


Dr. S. Tarrasch 
White 

1 P-Q4 

2 P-QB4 

3 Kt-QB3 

4 Kt-B3 


C> A. Walbrodt 

Black 

P-Q4 

P-K3 

Kt-KB3 

B-K2 


The Vienna Tournament Book remarks of 
Black’s 4th move: 4, Dr. Tarrasch holds . . . 
P-QB4 1.0 be better/’ So consistently did the 
Doctor hold that view that the move is known 
today as the Tarrasch Defense, 

5 B-B4 

More usual was 5 B-K15, but Tarrasch could 


10 


January, l 9 4 o 


11 


not afford to give his opponent, a sure and 
sound book player, the odds of stereotyped 
play. 

5 , , . . P-B3 

6 P-K3 QKI-Q2 

7 P-K R3 ... * 

To be able to exit to K2 in the event the 
QB is attacked. 

7 ... . Kt-BI 

7 . , , P-QKt3 allowing for a fianchetto de- 
velopment of the QB and aiming for a break 
at , . . QB4 is suggested in the book of the 
tournament. 

S P-B5I .... 


Not 2H , . . KtPxP; 29 R-B3! to be followed 
by R-K13 and Black must yield to the pres- 
sure on the open tile. 

29 Q.Q2 R-KKtl 32 R(B4)-B1 R-Kt2 

30 Q-K1 B-K3 33 R-Kt2 QR*KKt1 

3t P-R4 R<R5)-R1 34 R-KR2 Q-Q2 

Black has attained his maximum defense. He 
must stall and await developments, 

35 B-Q3 R-R1 

36 G-Kt3 Q-K2 

37 R-KKtl QR-KKtl 

38 R(R2)-KKt2 R-KB1 

39 Q-B4 .... 


Fixing the Q side pawns which in turn 
restrains Black's mobility. If now 8 . . . 
P-QKt3 White maintains the bold with 9 
P-QK14. 

8 . . . . Kt-Kt3 

9 B-R2 Q-R4 

A loss of time. Relatively best was 9 . . . 
P-QKI3; TO P-QKt.4, PxP; H KtPxP, Q-R4; 
12 Q-Q2. Kt-Q2 striving to free the game with 
. . . P-K4. 

10 P-QR3 K1-K5 

11 B-Q3 .... 

Better was 11 P-QKN. for after the text 
move Black might have secured his Kt at 


Preventing anv liberating action such as . . . 
P-Bo, 

39 ... . QR-KKtl 

40 Q-R6 B-Q2 

41 K-R2 B-K3 

42 R-Kt5I .... 

The beginning of the final phase of the 
attack, which Tarrasch conducts with vigor 
and precision. 

42 ... . B-Q2 

43 K*Kt31 B-K1 

44 K-B4I .... 

Stein itz must have beamed at the emulation 


K5 with 


P-Bl. 


of his precepts. 


11 .... 

12 Q-Q2 

13 KtxKt 

KtxKt? 

Kt-K R5 

SxKt 

44 

■ ■ ■+ * ■ w 

45 P-R5 3 ! 

B^QS 

■ » “■ m 

14 P-Q Kt4 

Q-Q1 

At last! 


15 QxKt 

* ■ ■ ■ * 

45 ... . 

B-K1 

Black remains with an 

immobile QB, 

46 PxP 

BxP 

15 ... . 

0-0 

47 B-K2 

+ + * * 


16 0-0 Q-Q2? 

17 Q-B2 P-B4 

18 K-R1 . . , . 


Preparing for the classical attack P-Ki4, etc. 


18 ... . B-Q1 24 R-KKtl K-R1 

19 B-K5 B-B2 25 Q-K Kt2 P-QR4 

20 P-B4 BxB 26 B-Ktl RPxP 

21 BPxB Q-K2 27 RPxP R-R5 

22 P-K Kt4 P-K Kt3 28 PxP KPxP 

23 R-B4 B-Q2 


Not 47 BxP, as the B is snbject to a pin 


47 ... . 

Q-Q1 

48 B-R5 

BxB 

49 QxB 

* * V V 

Q-R5ch was 

threatened, 

49 ... . 

RxR 

50 RxR 

RxR 

51 QxR 

Q-KB1 

52 P-K 6 

Resigns 



INLAID 

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12 


The Chess Review 


Book Reviews 

LOO CHESS GEMS 
By P, Wenman $1. 00 

This paper bound volume is attractively 
gotten together, and suffers (insofar as this 
reviewer could find) from none of the egregi- 
ous typographical errors prevalent in Mr* Wen- 
man’s previous effort, ' Remarkable Endings/ 1 

But, apparently no great ingenuity was dis- 
played in gathering the games, and the notes 
are generally less than adequate. Most of the 
old favorites are here: the brilliant fireworks 
of the past, up to and including such memor- 
able games as RetUAIckhine at Baden-Baden 
(1925), or the charming Mlkenas-Dreiburg 
encounter at Kemeri (1939), However, these 
games are to be found in other collections, 
more competently annotated, whilst the superb 
efforts of Fine, Reshevsky, Botwinnik, Keres 
and others have not earned a single place 
between these covers. Capablanca appears in 
only one game — that he lost— but Prince Dad- 
ian (of curious memory) is present against 
Bitch am, Kolisch battles against 'Another” and 
Daum fights one out with Noordyk. The 
majority of the games are P-K4, and all posi- 
tional games, however, subtle and beautiful, 
are omitted. 

The contest between Hartlaub and Beharry, 
played HH in Bavaria in 191 1,” is perhaps amus- 
ing enough to be reproduced. At any rate, it is 
new to me. 

— /, R , Newman 


Py ro technics Par Excellence 

Played m Bavaria in 1911 
QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED ■ 


H a rt I a u b 

White 

1 P-Q4 P-Q4 

2 P-QB4 P-K3 

3 Kt-KB3 P-QB4 

4 P K3 Kt-QB3 

5 K1-B3 Kt-B3 


Beharry 

Black 

6 P-QR3 B-Q3 

7 PxBP BxBP 

8 P-QKt4 B-Q3 

9 B-Kt2 , . , , 


The old method of playing the Queen's Gam- 
bit Declined, 


9 , , , , 0-0 

10 Q-B2 PxP 

11 Kt-KKt5 . . . . 


With the strong threat of 12 Kt-Q5, PxKt; 
13 BxKt. 

11 ... . P-K Kt3 

12 0-0-0 Q-K2 

13 RxB .... 


The key move of a combination of great 
beauty. If QxR; 14 QKt-Kl, KtxKt; 15 KtxKt, 
Q-Ql; Ifi B m followed by 17 P-KR4, 

13 , . , . P-KR3 


14 P-KR4 PxKt 

Black must recover the piece. 

15 PxP Kt-KR4 

16 KRxKt .... 

Both Rooks offered. A very pleasing situation. 

16 ... . PxR 

17 KLQ5 PxKt 

18 Q-R7ch .... 

The crowning sacrifice of a really great 
game, 

18 ... . KxQ 

19 R-R6ch K-Ktl 

20 R-R8 mate. 


The King teas m the C otmlhig-H ouse, 
A Queen and Rook ahead, 

Along came some had checks , 

And put him {r tn the red:' 

DANISH GAMBIT 
Hartlaub Testa 



White 



Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

6 

Kt-B3 

P-Q3 

2 

P-Q4 

PxP 

7 

Kt-B3 

Kt-KB3 

3 

P-QB3 

PxP 

8 

0-0 

BxKt 

4 

B-QB4 

PxP 

9 

BxB 

0-0 

5 

BxP 

B-Kt5ch 

10 

P-K5 

Kt-K5 


10 . , „ PxP could have been played. 

11 B-Kt2 B-K15 

12 Q-Q4 .... 

The opening move of a splendid combination. 

12 ... , BxKt 

13 PxB Kt-Kt4 

14 K-R1 .... 

A very clever offer of two Pawns. 

14 ... . KtxP 

15 Q-Q3 KtxKP 

16 R-KKtl 

The point of the combination. The Queen 
cannot be taken. 

16 ... . Q-Q2 

For if If) , . , KtxQ; 17 RxPch, K-R1 ; IK 
R-KtSch, KxR; 19 R-Ktlch. 

17 Q-Q2 Kt-Kt3 

18 Q-Q4 .... 

Forcing the Knight to return to K4. 

18 . , , . Kt-K4 

19 RxPch .... 

Leading to an excellent, mate. 

19 ... . KxR 

20 R-Ktlch K-R1 

EC 20 , . . K B 3, White mates in three moves 
by 21 Q-R4ch. 


21 QxKtch PxQ 

22 BxPch P-B3 

£3 BxPch RxB 

24 R-Kt8 mate 


MID-WEST MATCH 

Traveling over a hundred miles. Central 
Indiana Chess Association players defeated 
Cincinnati Chess Club on twelve boards Sun- 
day, December 17th at the Cincinnati Mercan- 
tile Library by a score of IS^-IO 1 ^ in a double 
round match. 


w ■ * ■ 


January, 1940 


13 


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By Irving Chernev 

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14 


The Chess Review 


Queen and Pawn Endings 

{ Every player has at one time or another 
been exasperated beyond endurance by the in- 
tricacies of a Queen and Pawn ending * Here 
are two specimens which are unusually rich in 
finesses * ) 

International Team Tourney 
Stockholm - August, 1937 

Position after Black’s 98th move 


Kashdan 



F rydman 


The game is won for Black, but care must be 
exercised to avoid possible perpetual checks* 

99 Q»B3 .... 

A little pleasantry which, however, hardly 
affects the course of the game. 

99 * . . . Q-B5ch 

100 K-R5 P-B7 

Giving up one of the Pawns, as the win is 
now forced* A neat finesse is still required at 
the finish, 

101 QxP K- Ktg 

102 Q-Kt6ch K-R7 

103 Q-R7eh K-Kt6 

104 Q-Q3ch .... 

The only move to stop the immediate queen- 
ing, If 104 Q-KtGch, K-R5; 105 Q-R7ch, K-K15 
and the Queen can interpose on the next check, 

104 , . ♦ . K-R5 

105 Gfc-BI Q-Q7ch 

106 K-R6 K*Kt6! 

If 106 . * * Q KS; 107 Q-B4ch etc. Black's 
plan is to play . * * K-Pl 7 and then , , + Q-KS, 
after which there will be no more checks* 
Should White's Queen move, a series of cheeks 
will force a second Queen (107 Q-Kt5, Q-R7ch; 
108 K-Kt6, Q-KSch; 109 K-R5, Q-KSch or 109 
K-E7, . . , Q L B2ch, followed by * . * P-BS(Q)* Or 
107 Q-B4, Q-Q3ch! and if the King goes to the 
7th rank, then * « . Q-K2ch followed by an ap- 
propriate check on KB3 or KB1. If the King 
goes to the 5th rank, then * . * Q-K4ch followed 
according to circumstances, by * * * Q-B3ch or 
by , * * Q-B5.) 

107 K-Kt7 


Important, If at once 107 * * * K-E7; 108 Q- 
Kt5! after which Black has no checks, and it jte 
difficult to avoid a perpetual check. After the 
text, White’s King has no square which makes 
possible such a situation. 

108 K-KtS K*R7 

White resigns. The threat is of course * * , 
Q-K8. If 109 Q-B4, Q-Klch; 110 K-Kt7, Q-K2ch 
and either . * . Q-Blch or * * * Q-B3ch followed 
by * * * P-B8(Q). 

— L Kashdan 

Kemeri Tournament 
June, 1937 

Position after Black’s 65th move 


Keres 



Flohr 


66 Q-Q7ch . . . . 

The winning move. Black is now "on the 
spot,” for not only is he a Pawn down to begin 
with, but he must lose another one: (1) if * * * 
K-Ktl or , * * K-Kt3 the KtP falls with check; 
(2) if . * * K-Bl; 67 Q-B5ch winning a P with 
F-K5; 75 P-E6, P-R6; 76 P-B7, F-R7; 77 P-BS 
(Q), P-RS(Q); 78 Q-B5ch, K-Kt6; 7& Q-B4ch 
check; (3) if * * * K-B3; 67 QxP, QxF; 68 Q-R4 

66 . . . . K-B31 ? 

Having looked more deeply into the last- 
mentioned variation, Keres has discovered the 
following continuation after 68 Q-R4ch: 68 ♦ * * 
QxQ; 69 PxQ ? K-B4; 70 K-Q2 (clearly the only 
winning possibility), K-Kt5; 71 K-B3, KxP; 72 
K-Q4, K-Kt5; 73 KxP, P-R4; 74 F-B5, P-R5; 75 
P-B6, F-K6; 76 P-B7> P-H7; 77 P-B8(Q), P-R8 
(Q) eh and the position is a draw* 

67 Q-QBch? 

Convinced by this silent dialogue, Flohr 
drops the variation— quite wrongly, for there 
are two ways of winning in it! The crucial 
position in the previous note is the following: 
White: K on: Q4, P& on K3 and KB4. Black: 
K on K Kt5 T P$ on K5 and KR3, It is White’s 
turn to play, and he can win by (1) 73 K-K5I 
P-R4 ( . . * K-B6 leads to a book loss) ; 74 P-B5, 
ch with a won ending. 

forcing the exchange of Q-s, after which White's 
KP wins; or (2) a method suggested by Dr* 
Euwe: 73 KxP, P-R4; 74 K-Q3! (the idea is Of 
course that White's two Ps are self-supporting, 
and he can therefore bring his K around to 
stop the RP), P-R5; 75 KK2 and wins (75 * . * 


Q-K61 


January, 1940 


15 


K-Kt6 ; 76 K-Bl etc.). Black can try 74 . . , 
K-Kt6 {instead of 74 , , , F-R5) but then follows 
75 P-B5, P-R5; 76 F-B6, P-R 6; 77 P-B7, P-R7; 
78 P-BS(Q), P-R8CQ); 79 Q-B4ch again forcing 
the exchange of Qs, and the KF wins. 

And now back to the text: 

67 ... . K-B2 


Flohr could now transpose Into the winning 
line with 68 Q-Q7ch f but he Is groping for an- 
other winning method. 

68 Q-B7eh K-Kt3 

69 Q-Q6ch K-B2 

70 Q-Q7ch K-B3 

Again White has his opportunity. A time- 

wasting possibility which had to be calculated 
here was 71 Q-Q4ch, K-B2; 72 QxP, whereupon 
Dr. Euwe demonstrates a curious perpetual 
check: 72 . . , Q-K8ch; 73 K-K2, Q-R7ch; 74 K- 
Kl t Q-RSch; 75 K-Q2, Q-R4ch; 76 K-Q3, Q-R6ch; 
77 K-Q.4, Q-Kt5ch; 78 K-Q5, Q-K12ch; 79 K-K5, 
Q-K2ch; 80 K-B5, Q-Q2ch; 81 K-K5, Q-K2ch 

g[(j ( 

71 Q-Q3ch ? K-B2 

72 Q-B7ch K-Kt3 

73 Q-Q6ch K-B2 

Now a tragic thing happens: FlohT discovers 
the win beginning with Q-Q7ch; but he can no 
longer play this move, as it would lead to a 
three-fold repetition, allowing Black to claim 
a draw! 


74 Q-Q2 

75 Q.Q1 

76 K-B2 

77 P-R3 

78 QxPch 


Q-RSch 

Q-B6ch 

P-R4 

PxP 

K-B1 


79 Q-KBSch K-Ktl 

If now 89 QxRP, Q-Q7ch draws; or if 80 Qx 
HP, Q-Q7ch; 81 K-Ktl, P-R7eh; 82 K-Rl, Q-QS 
ch! S3 KxP, Q-R4eh; 84 K-Kt 2, Q-K7ch with a 
draw by perpetual check (Dr. Euwe) ♦ 

After the text, Flohr plagued himself — and 
his opponent—for another 25 moves, but 
nothing more could be found. An ending with 
more than its share of finesse! — R 1?. 


CAPITOL CITY CHAMPIONSHIP 

Ariel Mengarini, George Washington Uni- 
versity junior and erstwhile Harvard student, 
followed the example set by many of his Har- 
vard predecessors into Washington, D. C. and 
promptly upon .Ills arrival garnered the champ- 
ionship of the Capitol City Chess Club, Donald 
Mugridge, who set the style, finished second, 
while Martin C. Stark, this year stayed on 
the side-lines. The championship, a double 
round-robin event, produced the following 
scores: 

Point 

totals 

A. Mengarini — - 1 % 

D. H. Mugridge 5 — 2 

H. A. Rousseau _ 4 2 1 / 2 

E. M. Knapp ' 3 —6 

R. Hostler .. 0 — 8 

* * * * 

A general tournament, run concurrently with 
the championship attracted an entry of ten. 
It is still in progress. 


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$5.25 

$1.50 

$1,25 

$1.25 

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$15.00 

$7.00 

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4.25 

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16 


The Chess Review 



Marshal) 

Chess Club Championship 



December, 1939 



GRUNFELD 

DEFENSE 



F* J* Marshall 

A, E. Santasiere 


White 



Black 

1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

32 

R-K4 

B-Kt3 

2 

P-QB4 

P-KKt3 

33 

R-K3 

RxP 

3 

Kt-KB3 

B-Kt2 

34 

RxR 

RxR 

4 

B-B4 

0-0 

35 

P-B3 

P-R4 

5 

Kt-R3 

P-Q4 

36 

PxP 

R-QR5 

6 

P-K3 

P-B4 

37 

R-K7ch 

K-B1 

7 

B-K2 

BPxP 

38 

R-K6 

K-B2 

3 

KPxP 

Kt-B3 

39 

RxQBP 

RxP(R6) 

9 

0-0 

PxP 

40 

P-R6 

Rx BP 

10 

BxP 

Kt-QR4 

41 

Kt-B2 

P-B4 

IT 

B-K2 

B-K3 

42 

K-Kt2 

R-QR6 

12 

B*K5 

R-B1 

43 

Kt-R3 

R-R7ch 

13 

R-K1 

Kt-Q4 

44 

K-Ktl 

R-RSch 

14 

BxB 

KxB 

45 

K-B2 

R-R7ch 

15 

Kt»KKt5 

B-B4 

46 

K-K1 

RxKRP 

16 

KtxKt 

QxKt 

47 

KtxPch 

K-K12 

17 

B-B3 

Q-Q2 

48 

Kt-K6ch 

K-B2 

IS 

P-QKt4 

Kt-B5 

49 

Kt-QSch 

K-Kt2 

19 

P-Kt4 

P-B3 

50 

Kt-K6ch 

K-B2 

20 

Kt-R3 

B-K3 

51 

Kt-B4 

B-R4 

21 

Q-K2 

B-B2 

52 

P-R7 

R-R7 

22 

QxP 

R-B2 

53 

R-B7ch 

K-B3 

23 

QxQ 

RxQ 

54 

KtxBch 

K-K4 

24 

QR-Q1 

KR-Q1 

55 

Kt-Kt7 

P-B5 

25 

P-K Kt5 

P-KR3 

56 

Kt-K8 

P-B6 

26 

PxRPch 

KxP 

57 

R-K7ch 

K-B4 

27 

R-K4 

Kt-K4 

58 

Kt-Q6ch 

K-B5 

28 

B-Kt2 

Kt-B3 

59 

R^B7ch 

K-K6 

29 

R-R4ch 

K-Kt2 

60 

Kt-B4ch 

K-Q5 

30 

BxKt 

PxB 

61 

Kt-Kt6 

P-B7ch 

31 

P-R3 

P-Kt4 

62 

K-B1 

Resigns 


A typical A pram game: quiet opening — 
careful mid -game maneuvering for an opening 
— and then a sudden onslaught * A nice ending 
in which the power of the 0 and B in com- 
bination is utilized to the utmost. 

Manhattan C. C* Championship 
New York — January 14, 1939 
DUTCH DEFENSE 
H« Avram J. Fulop 

White Black 


Both players aim for an attack with equal 
industry — but not with e equal marksmanship * 

Beigium-H oMand Match 
Brussels — Aprjl r 1939 

QUEEN'S INDIAN DEFENSE 


Soultanbeief 

Davidson 


White 


Black 


1 P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

17 P-KKt3 

Q-B3 

2 P-QB4 

P-K3 

18 P-B4 P-Q Kt4 

3 Kt-QB3 

P-QKt3 

19 P-K t4 

BxKt 

4 P-K4 

B-Kt2 

20 PxB 

Q-B2 

5 B-Q3 

B-Kt5 

21 P-Kt5 

PxBP 

6 Q-K2 

P-B4 

22 B-B2 

P-KR4 

7 P-Q5 

P-Q3 

23 P-B5 

PxP 

8 B-K15 

QKt-Q2 

24 PxP 

P-Q4 

9 Kt-B3 

P-KR3 

25 R-K3 

P-Q 5 

10 B-Q2 

0-0 

26 P-Kt6 

Q-Q2 

IT PxKP 

PxP 

27 RxKt 

KRxR 

12 0-0-0 

P-R3 

28 QxRP 

B-Q4 

13 P-KR3 

Kt-KI 

29 Q-R7ch 

K-B1 

14 P-KR4 

Q-B3 

30 P-B6 

B-Ktl 

15 R-R3 

Kt-K4 

31 Q-R8 Resigns 

16 KtxKt 

QxKt 



He who takes what isn*t his* n 


Must give it back 

or go to pris’n. 


QUEEN'S INDIAN DEFENSE 


G, Abrahams 

Dr, J, Cukierman 

White 


Black 


1 P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

20 B-B5 

PxP 

2 P-QB4 

P-QKt3 

21 BxB 

PxKt 

3 Kt-QB3 

B-Kt2 

22 B-K6 

KtxB 

4 P-B3 

P-B4 

23 PxKt 

R.R3 

5 P-Q5 

P-Q3 

24 Kt-Q5 

R-QR2 

6 B-Kt5 

Q Kt-Q2 

25 Kt-B4 

K-R1 

7 P-K3 

P-Kt3 

26 Q-B5 

Q-QB1 

8 KKt-K2 

B-Kt2 

27 KtxP 

KtxR 

9 P-KR4 

P-QR3 

28 KtPxKt 

Q-B1 

10 Kt-Kt3 

P-KR4 

29 KtxB 

KxKt 

11 B-K2 

Kt-R2 

30 R-B4 

R-Kt3 

12 P-B4 

P-B3 

31 R-R4 

R-R1 

13 Q-B2 

KKt-BI 

32 Q-R5 

K-83 

14 B-Q3 

K-B2 

33 P-K4 

K-Kt2 

15 0-0 

Q-KT 

34 Q-R7ch 

K-B3 

16 P-B5 

PxB 

35 R-B4ch 

KxP 

17 PxPch 

K-Ktl 

36 Q-R3ch and 

White 

18 R-B7 

Kt-K4 

mates in six. 

19 QR-KB1 

B-B1 




1 Kt-KB3 

P-KB4 

17 R PxP 

RxR 

2 P-Q4 

P-K 3 

18 BxR 

PxP 

3 P-KKt3 

Kt-KB3 

19 BxP! 

R-B2 

4 B-Kt2 

P-Q4 

20 Q*Q4 

B-B1 

5 0-0 

B-K2 

21 B-B3 

P-Kt3 

6 P-QB4 

0-0 

22 P-K4 

B-KKt2 

7 P-Kt3 

P-B3 

23 K-Kt2 

Q-Ktl ? 

3 B-Kt2 

QKt-Q2 

24 PxP 

KPxP 

9 QKt-Q2 

Kt-K5 

25 BxP! 

PxB 

10 Kt-K5 

QKtxKt 

26 RxR 

KxR 

11 PxKt 

Q-R4 

27 P-K6ch 

KxP 

12 KtxKt 

BPxKt 

28 QxB 

Q-Kt2 

13 P-QR3 

P-Q Kt4 

29 Q-B6ch 

K-Q2 

14 P-QKt4 

Q-B2 

30 B-Q4! 

Q-R3 

15 P-B5 

P-QR4 

31 P-B6ch! 

K-B2 

16 P-B3! 

R PxP 



On 31 . . 

, QxP; 32 

Q-B7ch, K-Ql; 

33 B-B6 

ch! 




32 B-K5ch 

K-Kt3 

36 B-Q4ch! 

K-R 1 

33 Q-QScK! 

K-R2 

37 Q-Q8ch 

Q-Ktl 

34 Q-B7ch 

B-Kt2 

38 Q-R5ch 

Resigns 

35 PxB 

QxP 




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Games from the 

International Team Tournament at Buenos Aires 



NIMZOW1TSCH DEFENSE 
Enevoldsen Keres 


An old gambit variation. If 3 , . , 
Kt-t)B3, Kt-KB3 (best); 5 Q-K2 to 

PxF‘ 4 
be i ? ol- 


Denmark 

White 

Estonia 

Black 

lowed by 0-0-0 and P-Kt3 f B-Kt2, etc, 
ing to regain the P with attacking 

attempt- 

chances. 

1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

23 B-B5 

Kt-B5 

4 P-K5 

K Kt-Q2 

25 KxR 

P-KKt4 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K3 

24 B-K3 

Q-R4 

5 Q-Kt4 

P-QB4 

26 B-Kt2 

R-RIch 

3 

Kt-QB3 

B-Kt5 

25 BxKt 

PxB 

6 P-KB4 

Kt-QB3 

27 K-Ktl 

PxP 

4 

Q-B2 

0-0 

26 Q-Q2 

Q-R3 

7 Kt-KB3 

P-QR3 

28 QxP 

P-B4 

5 

Kt-B3 

P-B4 

27 P-Kt4 

KR-Q1 

8 B-K2 

Kt-K2 

29 R-Q2 

R-R5 

6 

PxP 

Kt-R3 

28 Q-Kt2 

Q-Kt3 

9 0-0 

Kt-B4 

30 BxBch 

QxB 

7 

B-Q2 

KtxP 

29 R-Q1 

P-KR4 

10 Q-R3 

P-KKt3 

31 R-Kt2 

PxP 

8 

P-K3 

P-QKt3 

30 PxP 

KtxRP 

11 P-KKt4 

Kt-Kt2 

32 Q-B6 

Q-K2 

9 

P-QR3 

BxKt 

31 Kt-Kt2 Kt-Kt6ch 

12 Q-Kt3 

P-KR4 

33 R-R2 

RxR 

10 

BxB 

B-Kt2 

32 PxKt 

Q-RSch 

13 P-KR3 

R-Kt3 

34 KxR 

P-Kt6ch 

11 

P-Q K t4 

QKt-K6 

33 Kt-R4 

PxP 

14 P-Q4 

PxQP 

35 K-K12 

Q-Kt2ch 

12 

B-K2 

P-Q4 

34 K“Kt2 

QxKt 

15 KtxP 

PxP 

36 Q-B3 

BxKt 

13 

B-Q4 

R-B1 

35 R-R1 

QB5 

16 PxP 

Kt-QB4 

37 QxQch 

KxQ 

14 Q-R4 

P-QR3 

36 B-Q3 

R-Q3 

17 Kt-Q2 

B-Kt2 

38 BxB 

Kt*B4 

15 

PxP 

P-GKt4 

37 R-R3 

QR-B3 

18 QR-K1 

Kt-K5 

39 B-B3 

K-B3 

16 

Q-Kt3 

QxP 

38 P-K5 

R-B7ch 

19 KtxKt 

PxKt 

40 B-K1 

K-Q4 

17 

Q-Kt2 

Q-KB4 

39 QxR 

QxPch 

20 R-B2 

B-B4 

41 B-B3 

K-K5 

18 

0-0 

Kt-Kt4 

40 K-Ktl 

Q-K6oh 

21 R-Q1 

Q-B2 

42 B-Kt2 

Kt-K6ch 

19 

Kt-KI 

KR-K1 

41 K-B1 

P- Kt7ch 

22 R-R2 

0-0-0 

43 KxP 

KtxP 

20 

P-B3 

P-K4 

42 QxP 

BxQch 

23 B-KB1 

P-K6 

44 K-B2 

Kt-Kt5 

21 

22 

P-K4 

K-R1 

Kt-R6ch 

Q-Kt4 

43 KxB 
Resigns 

QxP 

24 QxP 

RxR 

Resigns 



FRENCH DEFENSE 

An energetic counter-attack is the touch- 
stone of Black's success , 


This game was unwittingly headed years ago 
by Thomas Carlyle — T Infinite is the help 
man can yield to man T 

International Team Tournament 


L, Prins 

Holland 

White 

1 P-K4 

2 P-Q Kt3 

3 B-Kt2 


C. E. Guimard 

Argentina 

Black 

P-K3 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 


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Buenos Aires - 

- August, 1939 



FRENCH 1 

DEFENSE 



L, Prins 


J* J. Sierra 


Holland 


Ecuador 



White 



Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K3 

8 

0-0 

P-B4 

2 

P.QKt3 

P-QB4 

9 

P-B4 Kt(Q4)-K2 

3 

B-Kt2 

Kt-QB3 

10 

P-Q4 

KtxP 

4 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-B3 

11 

KtxKt 

BxB 

5 

P-K5 

Kt-Q4 

12 

Kt-Kt5 and 

White 

6 

P-Kt3 

P-QKt3 


won* 


7 

B-Kt2 

B-Kt2 





QUEEN’S GAMBIT ! 

DECLINED 



A position 

is never 

any 

stronger than its 

last blunder . 






E 4 Lundin 


Raud 



Sweden 


Estonia 



White 



Black 


1 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-KB3 

14 

QR-B1 

KR-Q1 

2 

P-B4 

P-K3 

15 

B-K2 

P-QB4 

3 

Kt-B3 

P-Q4 

16 

Q-R3 

P-QR4 

4 

P-Q 4 

B-K2 

17 

Kt-Q2 

P-K4 

5 

B-Kt5 

0-0 

18 

PxBP 

KtxP 

6 

P-K3 

P-KR3 

19 

Kt-B4 

Q-Kt4 

7 

B-R4 

Kt-K5 

20 

P-K Kt3 

Q-B3 

8 

BxB 

QxB 

21 

RxRch 

RxR 

9 

Q-B2 

KtxKt 

22 

R-Q1 ? 

RxRch 

10 

QxKt 

PxP 

23 

BxR 

B-R3 

11 

BxP 

Kt-Q2 

24 

Kt-Q2 

Q-Q3 

12 

0-0 

P-QKt3 

25 

Q-B3 

Kt-K5 

13 

KR-Q1 

B-Kt2 


Resigns 


If 26 KtxKt, QxBch ; 

27 

K-Kt2, Q-B8ch; 28 


1GB S, B-K7 mate. 


18 


The Chess Review 


FIRST STEPS 

By C J. S, Purdy 

(Many times Champion of Australia) 

WHERE TO PUT YOUR PIECES 
IN THE OPENING 

Part HI: A Complete Opening Discussed 

To illustrate the previous articles, we could 
present many different ways of playing the 
first half-dozen moves in chess- We think 
it will be more helpful, however, to demon- 
strate a single opening and carry it through 
to the early mid-game. For experience shows 
that it is more often the second half-dozen 
moves than the first, which trouble the average 
player. 

As our example we shall take the Pillsbury 
Attack in the Queen s Gambit Declined, for 
it is an excellent opening for giving one a grasp 
of the principles which govern opening play 
in general. 

We will not examine the opening critically, 
but will use its moves to illustrate principles 
given in the previous 11 First Steps" articles. 

Memorizing the moves will benefit the stu- 
dent very little, but if he studies them in con- 
nection with the "First Steps" articles his 
genera! conduct of opening play should im- 
prove considerably. 

The First Move 

With what move should White open? The old 
theory said P-K4 or P-Q4. These moves develop* 
and also lay hold upon important squares in 
the center. Modem theory also favors them, 
but nearly as popular among the masters is 
I P-QB4 and this bears out in a striking way 
the theory put forward by the present writer 
™that stress should be laid on getting out 
two adjacent central pawns two squares — he., 
either the QP and KP, QBP and QP, or KBP 
and KP, 

If White opens with P-K4, it is very easy 
for him soon to play out the QP, but the 
insecurity of White’s pawn at K4 can be ex- 
ploited by Black with the French Defense. 
(1 P-K4, P-K3; 2 P-Q4, P-Q4; 3 Kt-QB3, 
and now either 3 BJCt5 or 3 Kt-KB3) — the 
insecurity being evident because there is no 
piece supporting the square K4. Notice that 
Q4 is supported by the Queen, and the squares 
QB4 and KB 4 are supported by masked 
Bishops. 

If White opens with P-Q4 Black can prevent 
P-K4, and can satisfactorily meet P-QB4, say 
some theorists, by simply taking the pawn. 
White's trouble is that he must shut in his 
QB (by P-K3) to recapture the pawn. 


Now consider 1 P-QB4. This move, unlike 
P-K4, is perfectly secure, and it only remains 
for White to play P*Q4, a move which is also 
well supported. True, White does not wish 
to recapture on Q4 with his Queen, but he 
can recapture with the King's Knight which 
will be well posted on that square. If Black 
replies with 1 P-K4 or 1 P-QB4, White will 
not play P-Q4 immediately, but will do so 
later on. In fact, the whole secret of the 
English Opening lies in timing P-Q4 to a 
nicety. 

The double push that we think so funda- 
mental, has a very simple purpose. It is the 
only way to open files for the use of the Rooks. 
Surely the importance of utilizing the Rooks 
is obvious. Remember that the two Rooks 
form a quarter of your total force! Therefore, 
the primary objective behind 1 P-QB4, which 
itself is not technically a developing move, is 
development! Note that the pawns must be 
adjacent—not P-Q4 and P-KB4, for instance, 
for that system creates a "hole," The two 
adjacent pawns abreast mutually strengthen one 
another. 

It is impossible to say what is Black's best 
answer to 1 P-QB4. The obvious move 1 
P-K4, is open to the same objections, in greater 
degree, as 1 P-K4 for White- Noticing that 
P-QB4 gives White a hold on the important 
center square Q5, we might think of 1 . . . 
P-Q4, but this permits White a very favorable 
pawn exchange. Better, therefore, is prepara* 
tion by 1 . . . P-K3 or I , , . P-QB3, and 
of these the more logical is l . . . P-K3, since 
it aids development- This move is considered 
Black’s safest. Now we can begin. 

The Pillsbury Attack 

1 P-QB4 P-K3 

2 P-Q4! P-Q4 

We have now arrived at the Queen's Gambit 
Declined- Black's QB is shut in, but experi- 
ence has shown that the early sortie of the QB 
in this type of opening is, in most cases, too 
hazardous for Black— see "Biffing the Bishop" 
in a previous installment. White has the initi- 
ative, for it still remains for Black to get his 
second pawn out two squares — the QBP on 
present indications. 

3 Kt-QB3 .... 

Clearly the most natural developing move. 
Now Tarrasch said Black should play P-QB4 
at once, but the move is obviously risky, be- 
cause White can then open up lines, and open 
lines naturally favor the party which has the 
more pieces in play. Here White has one and 
Black none. On the other hand, a move which 


January, 194 0 


19 


cannot be bad is 3 Kt-KB3, because we know 
that KB 3 is usually the King’s Knight’s ideal 
square. 

3 , . . . Kt-KB3 

4 B-KtM B-K21 

Developing one piece and unpinning another, 

Always seek a developing move which serves 
a second good purpose, too. 

5 P-K3 QKt-Q2 

As we know, Black must not block his QBP, 
but it looks (and is) unsafe to play P-QB4 
at this stage. The development of the QKt 
at Q2 is therefore indicated. 

6 Kt-B3 0-0! 

As the opening up of the Q side is the whole 
theme of this opening, there is no point in 
Black’s reserving the option of Q side castling, 
although, it is true, White sometimes takes 
this risk, 

At practically any stage, Black could "put 
the question” to White’s QB with P-KR3, but 
this raises complications into which we need 
not delve now. 

7 R-Bl! .... 

Pursuing the leading idea of the double 

pawn push — -Rook development! The other 
developing move, 7 B-Q3, allows Black to 
take the 'gambit pawn” without losing a tempo, 

opening the fianchetto diagonal for the QB. 

7 , . . . P-QKt3 

Black’s only developing move. This gives 

the out-and-out Orthodox Defense — "strongs 
orthodox” as the Germans call it— although 
the more artificial . . , P-B3 has long been 
in greater vogue. The old move has never 
yet been refuted, despite the various attempts 
made to invalidate it. 

8 PxP PxP 

White, of course, immediately doses the 

diagonal which Black has so clearly expressed 
his intention of using. Black cannot recapture 
with the Knight, or his QBP is lost, 

9 B-Q3 .... 

Pillsbury s move, and probably the best. 


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9 . * * * B-Kt2 

10 0-0 P-B4! 

Absolutely compulsory after playing P-QKt3, 

as otherwise the QBP is left "backward.” A 
backward pawn on an otherwise open file 
is likely to be lost. 

11 Q-K2! .... 

Always the best square for the Queen in 

this opening, because it is the least exposed. 
If 11 PxP, Black naturally retakes with the 
pawn, for the two pawns abreast give moral 
support to each other. In case of dire neces- 
sity, one of them can advance and thus be 
protected by the other, Two such pawns 
abreast are called "hanging pawns.” As they 
can both be attacked by Rooks they are weak, 
but because they grip so much of the center 
between them, they are also strong! On the 
other hand, a single isolated pawn, that is, 
a pawn which has no fellow-pawn to support 
it, is rather weak as a rule. The handicap 
usually is about equivalent to the loss of a 
tempo— in the opening. 

Having played B-Q3, White naturally con- 
templates attack on the K-side, for which the 
control of the center is essential. Consequently 
in this position it would not be logical to play 
for the "hanging pawns,” He must maintain 
his own pawn on Q4. 

11 ... . KUO! 

As Black’s development is still incomplete, 
this appears to be a violation of principle. It 
does lose a tempo, but the point is that it 
forces White to do likewise. He must either 
exchange Bishops, whereafter Black recaptures 
with a developing move (QxB), or move his 
QB to another square. Therefore, the maneu- 
ver loses Black no time, and must be good 
because it makes his game less restricted. If 
White exchanges. Black’s Queen is brought to 
her ideal square. 

12 B-KB4! KtxKt! 

As White cannot recapture with a develop- 
ing move, this exchange does not lose time; 
if White recaptures with the Rook, Black's 
other Knight gets to K5 with a biff. And if 
he recaptures with the pawn, he blocks his 
Rook. Exchanges are good for the side with 
the more restricted position, for the fewer 
pieces you have, the less they can get in each 
other’s way! 

1 3 PxKt P-B5 ! 

Not developing, but it biffs and so it does 
not lose time. It gives up pressure in the 
center, but prevents White ever using his QR 
on the QB file by the now impossible P-QB4, 
and also drives White’s KB off one of his two 

(Continued on page 24) 


Problem Department 

By Vincent L* Eaton 

Address all correspondence relating to this department to V .L, Eaton, 22 $ 7 Q Street, N. W . } Washington, D.C 
Questions About Problem Matters Will Be Answered If Accompanied By Return Postage, 


I am very grateful to all of you who sent 
Christmas and New Year's greetings* One of 
the peculiar but pleasant customs we problem 
composers have is to exchange cards with 
unusual compositions on them, and I cannot 
refrain from quoting some delightful items that 
came in this year's mail (Nos* 1529* 1531, and 
1541-1545)* No. 1541 Is much more complex 
than it seems at first glance; it involves some 
delicate analysis of previous play. In Nos. 
1543-1545 it is understood that Black moves 
first and helps get himself mated in the re- 
quired number of moves. No* 1543 is by 
England’s great exponent of Fairy Chess, one 
of the most original minds ever to apply itself 
to a chessboard. In honor of T. R. DCs fiftieth 
birthday, on November 28 last, his admirers 
collaborated on a special issue of the Fairy 
Chess Review, which we recommend to all 
who are interested in the unusual in Chess, It 
contains 500 problems of all types from 28 2 
composers — a wonderful tribute to a great man, 
Copies may be obtained for 2s* 6d, (about $*65) 
from T. R. Dawson, 2 Lyndhurst Road, Thorn- 
ton Heath, Surrey, England* 

& # # * # 

The Australasian Chess Review announces a 
composing contest for original direct-mate two- 
movers. Judge: F* T. Hawes* Send problems 
in duplicate before June 30 next to W* E, 
Williams, South Bowenfels, New South Wales, 
Australia, Five prizes will be awarded for the 
best compositions. 

# « 4 # $ 

We are extending the expiration date for the 
informal composing contest we announced last 
October to Feb* 15, 1940, Remember the stipu- 
lation: Problems in which “either side is to 
play and mate in two,” with non-checking 
keymoves. 

* * # * £ 

Geoffrey Mott- Smith comments as follows on 
his clever set of self-mates, Nos, 1534-1536: 
“The self-mate problem by me published in 
The Chess Review for June, 1937, No. 726, 
shows in one variation a little exploited maneu- 
ver. The Kings are in diagonal line, with a 
Black Bishop ambushed behind the Black King. 
It being impossible to destroy the excess White 
force and then compel the Black King to 
vacate the line so as to mate by discovery. 
White forces the Bishop in front of his King 
and then compels mate by the familiar device 
ol: mutual pin. 

“The series of problems, Nos, 1534-1536, 
shows a version of this theme on a lateral line. 
The Rh2 precludes mate by simple discovery* 
The Ral must be maneuvered to the right of 
Black's King. The interest of the series is 
largely in how the selection of minor piece to 
help the White Queen affects the length of 
the solution. Purists who gag at the focal 
dual on the second move in Nos. 1535 and 
1536 can transfer the Queen elsewhere as they 
please. 1 prefer the post g3 in order to pre- 
serve the symmetry with No. 1534.” 


No. 1505 in last month/s issue should have 
been labeled “Mate in 3.” 

.}£ 

HINTS FOR THE SOLVER* 111 

When the ’White force is small, and Black's 
moves offer no obvious clues to the solution, 
one may try a second method, namely, to 
eliminate White's pieces one by one in order 
to find which makes the keymove. Remember, 
in so doing, that a problem almost never begins 
with a. check or a capture of any Black piece 
except perhaps a Pawn. This helps to limit 
the moves you may try. 

Take No* 1537* Inspection shows that the 
White King may not move because of strong 
Black checks; if the Queen plays, Black’s 
defense 1 . , * QdSch is ruinous; and the White 
Pawn e4 and Knight f4 may be eliminated 
because their moves would allow check to 
Black, Moving the Bishop leads to nothing 
and 1 Pf6 is defeated by 1 , . . Qd8. Therefore 
the Knight g4, being the only juece left, must 
make the key, 

Try this elimination method yourselves with 
Nos. 1538-1540. 

(To be continued) 

H* * + * * 

INFORMAL LADDER 

(Maximum score for Nos. 1465-1482: 66) 

*J. Rivise 856, 54; *A. Sheftel 845, 43; *F* 
Sprenger 834, 51; W. O. Jens 766 r 46; T. 
McKenna 724, 42; *W* Patz 736, 20; ****P. L, 
Rothenberg 586, 54; **J. Hannu-s 570, 50; K, Lay 
539, 32; I. Burn 567; G, Fairley 473, 49; **L 
Burst em 467, 51; Dr* M* Herzberger 453, 47; 
A, Tauber 425, 51; J* M* Dennison 367* 40; B* 
M. Marshall 404; A* A* J* Grant 350, 49; Dr, 
W, F. Sheldon 332, 54; ****Dr. G. Dobbs 320, 
54; P, A, Swart 242, 45; I* Sapir 241* 48; *Dr. 
P* G, Keeney 212, 51; ****H. B* Daly 162, 49; 
J. Donaldson 105* 50; ***1. & M. Hochberg 
101, 50; S. P* Shepard 89* 18; *E, Korpanty 57* 
51; R. Neff 55* 46; A, Fortier 60, 39; E. Popper 
47* 46; V. Rosado 79; W, C, Dod 75; A. B. 
Hodges 57; Plowman 51; C. E. Wirm- 

berg 47; Bill Clubb 19; W. D. Gibbs 16; F* 
Grole 6. 

Aurel Tauber's pretty miniature Rook-study* 
No. 1481, takes the quarterly Honor Prize lor 
long-range problems, and I. Rivise this month 
tops the Ladder for the second time. To both, 
our congratulations [ 


SOLUTIONS 

No, 1465 by Percy Rowater: Intended a pretty 

solution by 1 Pc4 ± but no solution as dia~ 
grammed because of Black defensive 
checks. Perhaps tho White Kins may be 
placed on (Two points) 

No. 14GG by Dr, G, Dobbs: I Qa2 (Two points) 
The symmetrical mates are nicely ex- 
ecuted — R other: berg. Very nice self- 
b 1 oc ks — S hepard , 

No. 14G7 by Dr. P, Gr. Keeney: 1 Qc2 (Two points) 
Key completes the block, and a nice cross 
mate is added — Rothenberg* Clever key 
giving a flight— Shepard. My vote^Tatz, 
Rivise* 


20 


January, 1940 


21 


No. 1519 

J. M. DENNISON 
Detroit, Mich. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1520 

DR. G* DOBBS 
Carrollton, Ga. 



Mate m 2 


No. 1521 

DR. G. DOBBS 
Carrollton, Ga. 


Wjsp 


§§§ Iff j 

B B 

ss p iB fl 

JJJ 1 

vn*> 

1®H® 


Mate in 2 


Original Section 


No. 1522 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 
Dedicated to Otto Wurzburg 



Mate in 2 


No* 1523 

DR. P* G. KEENEY 
Bellevue, Ky. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1524 

DR. P. G. KEENEY 
Bellevue, Ky. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1525 

BURNEY M. MARSHALL 
Shreveport. La, 



Mate in 2 


No. 1526 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N, Y* 



Mate in 2 


No. 1527 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N* Y* 



Mate in 2 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE FEBRUARY 25th, 1940 





















22 


Thu Chess Review 


Original Section (cont’d) 


No. 1528 

R W. WATSON 
Toronto, Canada 



Mate in 2 


No. 1531 

0. FAIRLEY 
New York, N. Y. 









Mate in 4 


No, 1534 

GEOFFREY MQTT-SM ITH 
New York, M. Y. 







t 



t 




SEEF-mate in 7 


No. 1521) 

CLAUDE DU BEAU 
Stockton* N. J. 














Kf 














mm& 


Mate in 3 


No. 1532 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N* Y. 



Mate in 4 


No. 1535 

GEOFFREY MOTT-SM1TH 
New York, N* Y* 



SELrF-mate in 9 


No. 1530 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N* Y + 






* 


Mate in 3 


No. 1533 

HERBERT THORNE 
Long Island City, N* Y. 



Mate in 4 


No. 1535 

GEOFFREY MOTT-SMITH 

N ew Yo r k, N . Y. 



SELF-mate in 11 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE FEBRUARY 25th, 1940 























23 


J A N U A R Y ? 19 4 0 


For the Armchair Solver 


No. 1637 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 
Unpublished 



Mate m 2 


No. 1533 

C. PROMISLO 
Hon. Men., 8th 


American Chess Congress, 1921 



Mate in 2 


No. 1539 

F. A, L. KUSKOP 
Good Companions, Jan., 1916 



Mate m 2 


THESE PROBLEMS 


No. 1540 

GEORGE HUME 


Good Companions, Apr., 1922 



Mate in 2 


No, 1541 

P, L. ROTH EN BERG 
New York, N. Y. 



Mate in 1 


No. 1542 

WILL C. DQD 
Oxford, Ohio 



SELF mate- in 4 


No. 1543 

T. R. DAWSON 
Thornton Heath, England 



(1) HELP-mate in 2. 

(2) Same, with all men one rank 
lower on board 


No. 1544 

DR, P. G. KEENEY 
Bellevue, Ky. 



HELP-mate in 3 


No, 1545 

DR. P. G. KEENEY 
Bellevue, Ky. 



HELP-mate in 2 


ARE NOT SCORED IN THE LADDER COMPETITION 



















24 


The Chess Review 


No. 1463 by Geoffrey Mott- Smith: 1 KaS (Two 
points) 

Another fine gleam with a fearless White 
King, Best two -d' — Rothenberg, Neat 
miniature — Shepard. Excellent Key and 
variety with small force — Fairley, My 
vote — Plowman, 

No. 1469 by the Problem Editor: 1 KcS (Two points) 
No. mo by F. W, Watson; 1 Qg4 (Two points) 
Fine mutate with two changed mates. 
My vote — Fairley. Nice added and 

c hange d m ales— Ko the n be rg. 

No. 1471 by F, W. Watson: 1 Rg5 (Two points) 
The startling key is reminiscent of Sam 
Loyd — Fairley. My vole — Sheldon. 

No. 1172 by A, Karlstrom : 1 Pg8(S) (Three points) 

1 . . . . Fg4; 2 ShC, 

A Pseudo-Indian with tries galore — Roth- 
enberg, Simple, but neat— Pata. 

No. 1472 by Thomas S, McKenna: 1 Sel (Three 
points) 

1 . , . Ke3 ; 2 Sc2ch. i , . . else; 2 Kg4, 
Quite difficult-— Horzberger. Good tries 
and good males — Rothenberg. Scintillat- 
ing simplicity — Patz. 

No. 1474 by Thomas S, McKenna: 1 Rf3 (Three 
pO-ints) 

1 « . . KxS; 2 Pd3. 1 . , . Kd5; 2 Pd4. 
An exquisite mirror model ( M red cross") 
mate. My vote — Roth enberg. Attractive 
quiet play and one beautiful mate — 
Fairley. 

No. 1475 by Dr. W. Massmann: Intended 1 Ba4. 

but there are cooks by 1 Kb? and l KbS 
(Three points each) 

No. 147 G by J. B. Parmelec: I Kcfl (Three points) 

1 . . , rffl r f 6; 2 SgGch. 1 . . . FgG, g5; 

2 Qb2ch. 1 ... S moves: 2 QbSch, 

Beautiful variations for a small problem 
— Heraberger. Well -constructed Meredith, 
with three distinct variations — Rothen- 
berg. Magnificent key — McKenna. My 

vote— Rivise. 

No. 1477 by Rudolf Popp: Intended 1 Eg3 f but 
there are cooks by 1 Rh3, 1 Bd6 ( and l 
Rc7 (Three points each) 

No. 1478 by Herbert Thorne: U Qa8 (Three points) 

1 ♦ . • - BxQ; 2 Pb7. 1 . . , Bf3; Z Raich, 
Tantalizing tries, clearance, block, pro- 
motion, and sacrifice play — Rot hen berg, 
Very good 2 - Bis hop study — Herzberger, 
Economy, avoidance of duals, and ob- 
scure key. My vote* — McKenna. My 

Choice — Sheldon. ; 

No. 1479 by Maxwell Btikofzcr: 1 Sf7 (Four points) 

1 . * . any: 2 SdG; 3 R accordingly. 
Some interesting mate situ a lions— Fairley. 
My vote — Hersiberger. Plowman. 

No. 1480 by R, Cheney; 1 Bh3 (Four points) 

1 . . , threat; 2 BcSch, I , . . Ba8; 2 
Pb4, Sb7; 3 RbGch, 2 . . . else; 3 BcSch. 

1 . . . Bb7; 2 Pb4, S any; 3 RaSch. 2 . . . 
B any: 3 BcSch. 

Very fine — Herzberger, A maze of in- 
creasing perplexities. My vote — McKenna. 
My choice — Sheldon. (This problem shows 
a Seeherger maneuver, in which a Black 
piece is decoyed to a square where an- 
other will subsequently Interfere with it. 
Novelty is introduced by means of a stale- 
mate try: after 1 . , , Ba8; 2 BcSch can- 
not be played because of 2 . , . Sb7l— 
Editor). 

No. 1481 by Aurel Tauber: 1 Pg5 (Four points) 

1 . . . - Kh2; 2 Kfl, Khl; 3 Ra4-a£ 1 . . . 
Kg2; 2 Rg4ch, Ka2; 3 Ra3. 1 . . . Fh2; 

2 Ra!-a3ch p Kg£; 3 Rg4ch. 

Key Is not good, but variety is pleasantly 
rleh. My vote— Rot hen berg. Clever play, 
despite poor key— McKenna. My vote— 
Burslein, R1vlse t Fairley, A beautiful 
& tn d y — He r zbe rgor , 

No. 1482 by Dr. G. Dobbs: 1 Sh4 (Four points) 

1 , , . Kd4; 2 Qetf, any: 3 Qd6; 4 Qd2eh. 

1 . . , Pc4; 2 Sfaeh. Kf4; 3 QfGch, Ke3; 

4 Sd2, 

Pretty play, though mates are the same 
— Rothenberg. Clever Q and S alter- 
nations — Fairley. 

No, 1483 by F. Gam age : 1 Sf5 

1 , . . KxR; 2 Sxd7. 1 . . . Ke5; 2 QhS 

ch, 1 . . . PdG; 2 SeTch, 1 „ . , PxR; 2 

Q&4, 


No, 1484 by F, Garnago: 1 Qd2 

1 . . , KxS; 2 QxPch. 1 . , . KxR (threat); 
2 Qxc3, 1 . , . RxR; 2 QdSch. 1' . . , 

RxP; 2 QxB. 1 , . , B else; 2 Bd4. 1 . . , 

Sg5; 2 Qf4ch. 

No, 1485 by F. Gamage: 1 Qbl 

l , , . Se7; 2 Qb6. I * ♦ , Pal; 2 Qb4. 1 
. . , Sc2; 2 Qb3. 1 . . . Pa 6; 2 QbGch. 
L , _ . BxB or Bdl; 2 Qxd3. 1 , . . Bfl, 
KeS; 2 Qb5. 

No. !4SG by F, Gamage: 1 Qdl 

1 . . . threat; 2 QxB. 1 . . , Bf5; 2 Qb3. 

1 . . , Kd4; 2 Qg4ch. 1 . . , BxP; 2 Bf4 

ch, 1 , , . Rf6* Rb3, eto.; 2 EfSch, 

No, 1487 by F, Gamage: 1 Qu5 

1 . . , Kf4 dr PxP; £ Qd5. 1 , . * KeG; 

2 Bg4ch, 1 . . . KxP; 2 Sd7ch. 1 , , . 

Ke4; 2 QdSch, 1 . , , else; 2 Sg4ch. 

No. 1433 by F. Gamage: 1 QoS 

1 , , , SxQ; 2 BxeG. 1 , , . PxB; 2 Se2. 
1 . - . BxQ, KxB, or KeS; 2 Rgach, 1 

. . . SxB or Pe3; 2 Rf3ch. 1 . . . Bg6 or 

Bg4 ; 2 Rg2ch. 

No. 1489 by F. Gamage: 1 SbS 

1 , , , threat; 2 Qf4, 1 , . . PxP; 2 QxgS. 

1 . , . PxB or Pc3; 2 Qxd3eh. 1 , , , Pf5; 

2 QxSeh. 1 . . . Pd2; 2 QxdSch. 

No. 1490 by F. Gamage: 1 Pd7 

1 , . . threat; 2 Qel. 1 , , , KcS; 2 Qc6 
ch, 1 . . . Rf2; 2 Qe3ch. 1 . , , Bg 3; 2 
Qxbfich, 1 , . . SdG; 2 Sf5ch, I . , , Pfo; 

2 Qeoch, 

No. 1491 by F. Gamage: I Qc2 

1 - . . RxQ: 2 Bf3, 1 . . . BxQ; 2 BeG, 

1 . , . SxQ; 2 Sd7. I . . . Bb3 (threat); 

£ Sxd4ch, 1 . , . KxS; 2 Qxd3, 

Dr. Keeney comments: ‘T found this sot 
interesting and quite entertaining, Gam- 
age Is a master- com post ng genius, ,J 


FIRST STEPS (continued from page 19) 
useful diagonals. Also, it creates an advantage 
for Black if ever he can bring about an end- 
gamej for he can make a passed pawn on the 
side where the enemy King does not stand, 
When in doubt, biff! 

14 B.B5 P,Kt3 

The White KB is still very mobile, and the 
same principle applies: biff! 

15 B-Ktt P-B4! 



With this. Black prevents a break-through 
in the center by P-K4. The character of the 
,middle*game is now clear. White must at- 
tack on the K-side, Black, after making his 
K side as secure as he can, will sidle up the 
flank pawns on the Q side. The chances are 
probably even. 




HONOR PRIZE PROBLEM 


DR. G. DOBBS 
Carrollton, Ga. 


'/•/S//SS '// 


WHITE MATES IN TWO MOVES 


The OFFICIAL ORGAN of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA CHESS FEDERATION 


BEATS EU WE 7%-6%! 


MANHATTAN C. C. CHAMPIONSHIP 
DR. EUWE t KASHDAN * E 


LAST ROUND THRILLS 
CER v RE1NFELD 


SSSSSSSSSfi 


MARCH, 1940 


MONTHLY 30 cents 


ANNUALLY $3.00 



OFFICIAL ORGAN of the 
United Staffs of America 
Chess Federation 

rjhe 

CHESS 

REVIEW 

Editor 

Ismael A. Horowitz 


Vol. VHI, No. 2 Published Monthly March, 1940 


Published monthly by The Chess Review, 25 West 
43rd St,, New York, N. Y. Telephone Wisconsin 
7-3742. Domestic subscriptions: One Year $3.00; 
Two Years $5.50; Five Years $12,50; Six Months 
$1-75, Single copy 30 cts. Foreign subscriptions: 
$3.50 per year except LL S, Possessions, Canada, Mex- 
ico, Central and South America. Single copy 35 cts. 

Copyright 1939 by The Chess Review 

'Entered as second-class matter January 25> 1937, at 
the post office at New York, N. Y,, under die Act 
of March 3, 1879.'" 


In the tragically premature death of 
Harold Morton, THE CHESS REVIEW 
loses an able executive and a witty an- 
notator; American chess loses a bright 
and promising player; and the American 
chess scene loses a lovable and striking 
personal ity. 

As a native of New England, Morton 
was particularly well-known and liked 
in that region, being its outstanding 
player for a good many years. 

Our contributor, Sarnie Winkelman is 
preparing a detailed account of Morton's 
chess career, to be published in an early 
issue. 


TO OUR READERS 


As our readers know, the delay in the publi- 
cation of this issue of The Chess Review was 


occasioned by the terrible accident which occur- 
red to the editors near Carroll, la. This resulted 
in the instantaneous death of Mr. Morton and 
grave injuries to Mr, Horowitz, Our readers 
will be glad to know that Mr, Horowitz has 
been making very rapid progress towards re- 
covery, and he has been greatly cheered by the 
many friendly messages and inquiries that have 
poured in from his friends in the chess world. 
In Mr. Horowitz's absence, his editorial tasks 
have been turned over to Fred Rein fold. It 
is our intention to make up for lost time by 
bringing out the following number of The 
Chess Her lew at a very early date, 


Because of the tardy appearance of this issue, 
we had intended to call it the February- March 
number. Postal regulations do not permit this, 
however. We are therefore calling it the 
March issue; but it goes without saying that 
every one of our subscribers will have his sub- 
scription lengthened by one issue. 


THE HAVANA TOURNAMENT 

This interesting contest took place toward 
the end of January, and aroused great enthusi- 
asm among Cuban aficionados. It was held in 
one of the most beautiful buildings in Havana, 
the Centro Asturiano. During the evening, 
swarms of tourists who were being shown 
around the city, watched the play with interest. 
The players were entertained by various govern- 
ment bodies and notable citizens of Havana, 
and taken on outings. The only American 
entry, I, Kashdan, was entertained by the 
American Club. From all accounts* the hos- 
pitable hosts spared no efforts to make the 
tournament a success. 


There is talk of holding an International 
Team Tournament in Havana next year, to take 
the place of the regularly scheduled F. I. D, F. 
Team Tournament. Presumably the event, if 
held, would have a strictly Pan-American char- 
acter because of war conditions. 

The tourney scores follow: 


1 , Kashdan . , 

2, Koltanowski 

3, Planas 

■4. Aleman t , . 

5, Blanco 

6. Gonzales . , 

7.-8. Meylan . . . 
7.-8, Paz 

9. Mora 

10, I : !ori do . . . 


7&— i y 2 
61/2-2 1/2 
6 -3 

5 1 /2-3/ 2 
5 —4 

4 — 5 

3/2-51/2 

3*/2 — 5 y 2 

2 —7 

11/2-7I/2 


AMSTERDAM QUADRANGULAR 
TOURNAMENT 

This tourney held in early February took a 
surprising turn. Euwe (2-1) was nosed out 
by Kmoch ( 2 1/ - 1/, ) . The other scores were: 
Van den Bosch (Uy/ll/,) and Landau (0-3)! 


25 



THE U. S. CHAMPIONSHIP 

By L. Walter Stephens 


The great American classic, the National 
Chess Championship Tournament for the title 
of American Champion, is at hand, At this 
writing (March 9th) the Tournament is an 
assured fact not only from the standpoint of 
finances but also from the quality of the field 
of Masters and Experts who will compete with 
Mr, Reshevsky for his title. 

The tournament will begin on Saturday, 
April 27th at 2 P. M, f in New York City at 
the Hotel Astor, Times Square, Broadway and 
43rd Street. The scene for the tournament 
will be in the glamorous surroundings of the 
Astor Grill Banquet Hall which has been 
made over into an exquisite Hall with the 
most modern refrigeration, making the place 
very comfortable for both the spectators and 
the Chess Experts regardless of the temperature 
outside. 

The Tournament will be of very great interest 
as it will decide the question whether Mr, 
Samuel Reshevsky, our present champion, can 
win three tournaments in a row against a field 
of experts who will be entered. This will be a 
very difficult task: for the very highly talented 
and esteemed Champion of the United States. 
The tournament will be additionally interesting 
to the many visitors to New York City for the 
World’s Fair, as the Astor will he a convenient 
place for the people from all over the country 
who have read about the great Chess Masters 
and Experts to see them in action in a struggle 
to the finish. 

We cannot give the lineup for the Tourna- 
ment at the present writing, as the entries do 
not close until March 30 and this is only 
March 9th. We are very sorry to note that the 
very artistic Chess Master, Mr. I. Horowitz, 
Editor of The Chess Review, will not be in 
the line-up on account of his accident on tour 
in Iowa, 

The National Committee, of which the writer 
is Chairman, is composed of Mr. Herman 
Helms, Mr, L. B. Meyer, Mr. R. Wahrburg, 
Mrs. Frank Marshall and Maude M. Stephens. 

My Committee has made only two import- 
ant regulations in respect to the tournament 
and different from previous tournaments, 
namely in the time limit and in the place of 
play. We have made a time limit of 36 
moves per hour and IS moves each hour 
thereafter, instead of 40 moves per hour as in 
the last .tournament. We have selected the 
Hotel Astor for play instead of Rockefeller 
Center where the last tournament was played. 


Twelve players have been seeded or granted 
the right to play in the final championship 
without playing in the preliminary or qualify- 
ing rounds. These players are, Samuel Resh- - 
evsky (champion), Ruben Fine, E Kashdan., 
Frank Marshall, I. Horowitz, A, Simonson, A. 
Denker, A. Dake, M, Haoauer, A. Kupchik, 
one Chicago player selected at Chicago, and one 
player selected by the Chess Clubs in California. 

Eight other players will be permitted to play 
in the Championship Tournament. They will 
be determined by preliminary or qualifying 
rounds held at the Marshall, Manhattan, and 
West Side Chess Clubs. If the entry list is 
large, another dub will hold an additional 
tournament with a fourth group. The pre- 
liminaries will begin on Sunday, April 14th 
at 2 P, M. 

The entry fees for players will be $10 to 
enter the preliminaries and an additional $10 
fee if they qualify for the finals. The entry 
fee for the seeded players will be $20. Entry 
in the preliminary tournament is open to all 
chess players in the country who are citizens of 
the United States. All fees are to be made 
payable to me and arc to accompany entry 
blank. Checks are to be made out to L. 
Walter Stephens, Chairman, and sent to the 
Alamac Hotel, Broadway and 71st Street, New 
York City. Entries for the preliminaries and 
for the seeded players will dose on Saturday, 
March 30 th, 1940. 

There will be five prizes amounting to a 
minimum of $1,000 and a maximum of $1,500 
for the leading players in the tournament, 
Prizes are tentatively fixed as fo Hows; 1st, 
$400; 2nd, $275; 3rd, $175; 4th, $100; 5th, 
$50. Bonuses for won games or drawn games 
will be contingent upon gate receipts and re- 
ceipts from public contributions, and will be ■ 
paid at the discretion of the committee. 

It is necessary to provide these prizes and the 
other expenses of the tournament by popular 
subscription. We therefore request your co- 
operation in this momentous event for the chess 
world in the form of a contribution to the 
expenses of the tournament. 

A season ticket admitting bearer to all rounds 
will be forwarded to all contributors of $5.00 
or over. We have already two contributions to 
$2 50,00 each and one of $100.00, We need 
$1,800.00 to meet all expenses, Please for- 
ward checks to L, Walter Stephens, Chairman 
at your earliest convenience so that the Com- 
mittee may be encouraged to bring their efforts 
to a successful conclusion on April 27th, 


26 


The Keres -Euwe Match 

By Fred Reinfeld 


Despite the alarums and cruel uncertainties 
of war scares, the chess-loving Hollanders 
could not forego the treat of this match, which 
has been in the air for several years, and which 
has been so eagerly anticipated by chess players 
the world over. This struggle was truly of 
world championship calibre, for Euwe is the 
ex-world champion, and Keres is the winner 
of the great Semmering Tournament and co- 
winner of the even more formidable Avro Tour- 
nament 

The final score (7*4 — &Y 2 ) tells the story 
of a taut and exciting contest Euwe got off to 
a fine start by winning the third and fourth 
games, afte£ two interesting drawn games (all 
four with the Ruy Lopez!) . Keres promptly 
tied the score by winning two beautiful games, 
Euwe again forged ahead by winning the sev- 
enth game; but now (as in his matches with 
Alekhine) he struck a bad patch, losing the 
eighth, ninth and tenth games, leaving him 
two games to the bad. 

This was too much to make up in a short 
match, but Euwe fought back bravely. He ad- 
ministered a fine drubbing to Keres in the 
eleventh game (on the latter s 24th birthday), 
but took a bad beating in the twelfth game. 
Keres needed only a draw in the remaining 
two games to clinch the match. In the thir- 
teenth game, Euwe played so nervously for the 
offensive that he soon found himself with a 
very inferior game, and was only too glad to 
accept his opponent's offer of a draw. He then 
won the final game, which, however, did not 
affect the outcome. 

While the play of both masters suffered 
somewhat from the tension of external condi- 
tions, the games have great theoretical value, 
and each one was a real battle. We intend to 
publish all the games, and begin with two of 
the best games of the match. 


(Dr, Euwe had high praise for his oppo- 
nent's fine play in this game.) 

Match, 1939-40 
(Sixth Game) 

(Notes by Fred Reinfeld) 


INDIAN 

DEFENSE 

Keres 

Dr, M. Euwe 

White 

Black 

1 P-Q4 

Kt-KBS 

2 P-QB4 

P-K3 

3 Kt-QB3 

B-Kt5 

4 Q-B2 

Kt-B3 

6 Kt-B3 

0-0 


Premature, as the subsequent play indicates. 

6 B-Kt5l P-KR3 


7 B-R4 .... 

Since Black has committed himself by early 
castling and must therefore be discreet about 
eliminating the pin with . . , P-KKt4, White 
rightly avoids the prosaic alternative BxKt. 

7 ■ . . P-Q3 

If 7 . . . P-KKt4; 8 E-Kt3, P-Kt5; 9 Kt^R4, 
KtxP; 10 Q-Q2 leaving Black's K side in a 
badly exposed state. Compare this with the 
game Euwe-Alexander (The Chess Review, 
July 1939, P. 161) in which Black went for the 
Pawn grab BEFORE castling. 

S P“K3 

Here — and later on as well — 0-0-0 merits 
consideration. Black will then have trouble 
in playing , , , F-K4, and in any event will have 
to precede this move with . . , BxKt, in order 
to prevent Kt'Q5. 

The seemingly aggressive 8 F-K4 permits 
Black to obtain an excellent position with 8 . . . 
BxKtch l 9 FxR, P-K4, etc. 

S . . . . Q-K2 

9 B-K2 P-K4 

10 P-Q5 Kt-Ktl 

11 Kt-Q2! 

Au important move. If instead 11 OO, Ex 
Kt; 12 QxB (or 12 FxB, P-KKt4; 13 B-Kt3 p Kb 
R4 followed by . . . T-KB4 and . , , Kt-Q2-B4 
with a fine game), P-KKt4; 13 B-Kt3, Kt-K5; 
14 Q-E2, P-KB4 with a splendid position for 
Black. 

11 ... * QKt-Q2 

This obvious-looking move was made only 
after considerable reflection. Black cannot yet 
play . . . P-KKt4, as the possibility of Q side 
castling is still available to White. Further- 
more, the advance of Black's KKtP is pointless 
so long as it cannot be followed up by . , . Kt- 
R4 or . . , Kt-K5> 

Nor can Black venture on 11 . . . ExKt; 12 
QxB (far better, of course, than 12 PxB? QKt- 
Q2 followed by . . . Kt-B4), Kt-K5? 13 BxQ, 
KtxQ; 14 BxR and wins. 

11 . . . R^Kl suggests itself as a preparatory 
move, but then comes 12 ExKt! and the indi- 
cated 12 . . . QxB? would be a gross blunder 
because of 13 Q-R4! (Note that without 11 
Kt-Q2 3 Black would have the resource of . , . 
BxKtch in this variation.) 

12 0-0 P-QR4 

. . . P-KKt4 is now out of the question, as it 
would enable White to open up the KB file 
with decisive effect*.. 

13 QR-K1 R-K1 

With his attention fixed on the uncomfor- 
table advance of White’s KBP, Euwe prepares 
for simplification. 

14 P-B4 BxKt 

Relatively best. 14 . . . PxP; 15 PxP would 
give White a tremendous superiority in posi- 
tion, as he would soon secure exclusive control 
of the K file, 

15 QxB Kt-K5 

Best; after 15 . . . F-K5 7 16 F-B5 followed by 
R-B4, the KP would soon fall. 

16 KtxKt .... 


28 


The Chess Review 


16 RxQ? would be a mistake because of 16 
. . . KtxQ; 17 PxKt (if 17 B-R4? KtxB-ch; IS 
RxKt, PxP anti White cannot recapture) , RxB 
and Black's preferable Pawn position gives 


him a promising ending, 


16 . ■ * . 

GxB 

17 P-KKt3 

Q-K2 

18 B-Kt4! 

* ■ m m 

This shows fine position 

judgment. White 


wants to play P*KB5, but without being left 
with the B, which would be hemmed in by 
White Ps on white squares, 

18 , , . * Kt-B3 

After IS , * , PxP; 19 KPxP Black would find 
himself in a terribly cramped position. 

18 , Kt-B4 would lead to much the same 

position as does the text, after 19 KtxKt, PxKt 
(not 19 . , . BxB; 20 KtxP) ; 20 BxB, QRxB; 21 
P-KB5! (21 QxRP, R-Rl leads to nothing)— 
with this difference, that Black would have an 
additional weakness on the Q side, 

19 KtxKtch QxKt 

20 BxB QRxB 

On 20 , . * KRxB Kuwe feared 21 PxP, QxP; 

22 QxQ, PxQ; 23 F-K4 and White's Q side ma- 
jority is dangerous — all the more so since 
Black is condemned to passivity for the most 
part. 

Despite all the foregoing simplification, the 
pressure on Black's game has not been fully 
neutralized, 



STALEMATE! M 


30 P-R4 K-B2 

31 K-B1 


21 R-B2 

Threatening QxP, If instead 21 QxP, PxP; 

22 Q-Kt4, P-B6! with a good game. 

21 , * * * P-QKt3 

22 QR^KBI Q-Kt3 

A difficult situation; White was threatening 

23 PxP, QxP; 24 QxQ, RxQ; 25 RxP, RxP; 26 
R-Q7 with a view to doubling on the seventh 
rank, 

22 , , . PxP would not do because of 23 QxQ, 
PxQ; 24 RxP, RxP; 25 RxP winning a P, 

23 P-KB5! 

Carrying out his objective. 23 PxP, 'RxP; 24 
RxP, QxR; 25 RxQ, KxR would give Black at 
least an even game, as the extra P would be 
of no importance, 

23 , „ . . Q-B3 

24 P-K4 

White’s strategical aim is now to advance 
th* K side Ps so as to open a file eventually 
with P-Kt5 (utilizing the target created by 
Black’s 6th move), 

24 , . , . P-B3 

ri-’ 

In order to obtain more maneuvering room 
for his pieces, hut he creates new weaknesses 
on the white squares, weakens the QP and 
creates important points of invasion on the Q 
file. 


25 PxP RxP 

26 P-QR4 1CB1 

The King is to be removed from the danger 
zone, so that White's K side advance, when it 
is finally carried out, will have only strategical 
significance. 


27 R-Q1 

28 P-Kt3 

29 Q-B3 


As White intends to operate on the KKt and 
KR files, his K will be safer in the center! 


31 . . . , 

32 K-K2 

33 R-R2 

34 P-KKt4 


K-Kt2 
R (1 )-B2 
Q-Q1 
P-B3 


. . . Q-KR1 would avoid the opening of a file; 
but in that event White could switch his R 
from R2 to Q2 (or QKt2) with several promis- 
ing possibilities on the Q side (Black's K can- 
not escape his fate!), whilst Black's Q per- 
forms a menial task on the other wing. 


35 R.Kt2 

36 R-Kt3 

37 Q-Q3 

38 R-KR1 

White has almost 
goal (P-Kt5) and has 
vere pressure; but it 
advantage to account 


R-B1 
Q-Q2 
Q-KB2 
R-KR1 

reached his strategical 
his opponent under se- 
ts not easy to turn the 


39 R (1 )-R3 R (3)-B1 

He intends to open the KR file and wishes to 
he in a position to dispute its control. In the 
event of 40 QxP, KR-Q1 followed by , . , R-Q5 
will provide formidable counter play. 

40 P-Kt5t R PxP 

41 PxP Q-B2 

42 Q-Q5ch K-R2 


Black's dearth of moves has allowed the Q 
to reach this commanding post. 

If 42 , . . Q-B3; 43 PxP! leads to a winning 
ending; 43 . . , QxQ (not 43 . , .PxP? 44 R- 
Kt7ch winning aR!); 44 KPxQ, RxR; 45 RxR, 
PxP; 46 R-R6, R-Bl ; 47 R-R7ch, . K-Bl; 48 P- 
B51 KtPxP; 49 K-Q3 and the further advance 
of the K to B6 will be decisive, 


KR-B1 

K-K2 

K-Q2 



March, 194 0 


29 


43 R-Q3 RxR? 

The sealed move (as in so many instances!) 
proves a serious error. Black should have 
played 13 . . . PxP and if 41 RxR, RxR; 45 Qx 
QP, QxQ; 46 RxQ r R-R51 and it is very ques- 
tionable whether White can win the ending. 
The drawback to the text is that it cedes the 
K;R file to White, enabling him to obtain too 


great a lead in mobility. 


44 

RxR 

PxP 

45 

R-R7 

Q-K2 

' To prevent P-B-6. 


46 

K~B3! 

R-B1 


If 46 * , , R-13 4 ; 47 Q-K6 with a winning game. 

47 K-Kt4 .... 

One can now appreciate the baneful effects 
of Black's mistake on move 43. His game is 
badly constricted, the moves of his pieces con- 
siderably circumscribed, and White's K is 
poised for a victorious invasion in the event 
that any pieces are exchanged. 

47 , R-B2 


Euwe 



Keres 


48 P-Kt4I I PxP 

This break-through has ■been well prepared 
and is elegantly carried out. 

He has little choice: if 48 , , , Q-B2; 49 RRS, 
Q-Kt2; 50 PxP, QxQ; 51 PxPch and the subse- 
quent ending is child's play for White, 

49 P-R5! Q-Kt2 

Other moves are no better, for instance: 

I 49 , , . P-Kt6; 50 R-R3, P-Kt7; 51 PxPch, 
K-Ktl; 52 RhR 3, Q-Kt2 ; 53 QxQch, KxQ; 54 
R-QKt3 and wins. 

II 49 * . . PxP; 50 QxFch, K-Kt2; 51 QxPch, 
K-Bl ; 52 R-R3, Q-Kt2 (if 52 , , , K-Q2? 53 Q- 
KtTch wins) ; 53 QxQch followed by KxP and 
the win of the KtP, when the advance of 
White's KBP decides. 

50 PxPch KxP 

51 QxPch K-R2 

Or 51 . * . K-R4 ; 52 QxKPch, K-R3; 53 R-Rl 
and wins, for Black cannot play 53 . . . R-K2 
because of 54 R-Rlch, K-Kt3; 55 Q-Q6ch, 

52 QxKPl P-Kt6 

A last try. If 52 , . . R-K2; 53 Q-R5cli, Q-R3; 
54 Q-B5ch etc. 


53 R-R3’ R-B3 

White threatened to win the QKtP by means 
of Q-R5ch, But the text doesn't helpv 

54 Q-Q4ch! R,Kt3 

Or 54 . . . Q-Kt3 (54 . . . K-R3; 55 Q^Rlch 
winning the Q) ; 55 Q-Q7ch, Q-Kt2 (again if 55 
, * . K-R3 ; 56 Q-R4oh wins the Q) ; 56 QxQch 
followed -by RxPch, etc. 

55 RxP Resigns 

A superb ending. 


(Euwe ! s best effort, and a nice birthday pres- 
ent for Keres/} 

Match, 1939-1940 
(Eleventh Game) 


(Notes by Dr, M, ETuwe) 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 


Dr. M. Euwe 
White 

1 P-Q4 P-Q4 

2 P-QB4 P-QB3 

3 Kt-KB3 Kt-B3 

A new move, 

7 P-K3 
S Q-Kt3 
9 B-G3 

Consistent, 9 , , , 


P* Keres 
Black 

4 PxP PxP 

5 Kt-B3 Kt-B3 

6 B-B4 Q-R4 


Kt-K5 
P-K3 
B-Kt5 

, P-B4, leading to a Stone- 
wall formation, merits consideration, but in 
that event White would profit from the super- 
iority of his KB over Black's QB. 


10 BxKt 

In order to force a slight weakness- in Black's 
P formation, 10 QE-B1 was also good. The 
fact that the text gives- Black the Bishop-pair 
is of no significance in this position. 

10 - . * . PxB 

11 Kt-Q2 


Menacing the KP, which in the last analysis 
can be protected only -by , , , P-B4, But this 
would make White's K5 a strong square for 
him, and there would be the possibility of a 
break-through with P-Q5 ; hence Keres resorts 
to combinative methods. 

11 ,... 0-0 

So that if 12 KKtxP, P-K4; 13 PxP, B-K3; 
14 Q-B2, B-B5 restraining White from castling, 
and at the .same time deploying the Bs to 
good effect. 


12 0-0 Q-KB4 

A new -combinative protection of the KP 
which is not quite correct and leads to loss 
.of a P. Whether the text is to be viewed as 
a mistake Is questionable, however, for -after 
12 . . . P-B4; 13 Kt-B4 White has a fine game; 
whereas the text leads to such complications 
that White's material advantage seems rather 
nebulous. 


13 Kt(2)xP 

Black threatens ♦ * . KtxF in all positions 
where his KB is not en prise. Thus if 13 
Kt(3)xP? BxKt; 14 KtxB (Kt-Q6?? or Kt> 
Kt3 ? ? simply loses a piece), KtxPI 

13 ... . BxKt 

So that if 14 KtxB, KtxP etc. 


30 


T h e Chess Review 


14 Kt*Kt3I 

This intermezzo makes White's position se- 
cure* Note that 14 Kt-QG would not lead to the 
desired result, for White's K2 would then 
be unguarded, and Black would have the aston- 
ishing reply 14 . . . KtxF! 

14 , * * , Q-Q4 

With an eye on the Bs of opposite color. 
Black invites 15 QxQ, PxQ; 16 FxB, EHC3. 
F-QB4 would then be virtually impossible with 
only slim winning prospects for White. 

15 PxB 

But now the ending would naturally be won 
for White, because he ha& no weak Ps and 
because Black's B is ineffective* 

Possibly 15 QxB was even better* since 
White will now be unable to advance his 
QBP* But it was difficult to calculate the 
consequences of 15 QxB* P~KKt4; 16 Kt-R5 etc. 

15 * . . * Kt>R4i 

The control of his QB5 gives Black a solid 
position* 

16 0*Kt4 

Exchange of Gs would again be fruitless* 

16 * . . * P-GKt3 

17 P-K4 Q-B3 

18 KR-Q1 * * * * 

To secure a passed F with P-Q5. 

18 . . * . R-Q1 

19 R-Q3 . * * , 

White must play for a K side attack — the 
only way to make his superiority tell. Hence 
he gets the R on the third rank before Black 
has time for . * , B J R3, 

19 . * . * B-R3 

20 R-B3 R-Q2 

Q-K7 had become a strong threat, as it could 
not be answered by 21 . * , P-B3 because of 
22 Kt-RiS, R-Q2; £3 KtxPch, PxKt; 24 H-Kt3ch 
followed by mate. 

21 Kt-R5 * * * . 

Inaugurating a combination whose conse- 
quences could not be calculated completely. 
The point is that in every instance White 
gets two Pawns for a piece, plus a strong 


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attack. Such combinations are seen frequently, 
and generally end successfully. 

The sacrificial intention of the text appears 
in the variation 21 , * . B-K7; 22 Kt-B6ch (22 
R-R3, BxKt; 23 RxB, QxKP gives Black a 
good game), PxKt; 23 R-Kt3ch, K-Rl; 24 
B-R6, B R4; 25 B-Kt7ch p K-Ktl; 26 BxFch, 

B-Kt3; 27 R-Kl (or 27 F-K5) with a view 
to Q-R3-B;i-R6 or P-KR4-5* White would then 
have excellent winning chances* 

21 * * * . P-B3 

If 21 , * * QxKP; 22 R-Kt3 wins, 

22 R-Kt3 K-R1 


Keres 



Euwe 


23 KtxKtP 

A new offer, but here it is not difficult to 
estimate its 'Consequences, as the best defense 
yields White four Pawns (three of them passed) 
for a piece: 23 . * , RxKt; 24 RxR, KxR; 25 Q- 
K7ch, K-Ktl (if 25 * * . K-Kt3; 26 F-K5 wins); 
26 QxBP, P-K4 ; 27 BxP* QxQ; 28 BxQ etc* 

23 * * * . QxKP 

Now White's attack is irresistible* 

24 Kt-R5 Q-B4 

If 24 . * t R-KB2; 25 B-R6 wins, 

25 KtxP R-KB2 

It 'is clear that Black can capture neither 
the Kt nor the B. If 25 , , * Kt-B 3 ; 26 KtxRi 
just the same* 

26 B-K5 

There is no defense after this move. The 
threat is 27 Kt-Kt4ch, K-Ktl; 2S Kt-RG mate. 
If 26 . * . RxKt; 27 Q-K7, QxPch; 23 K-Rl 
and Black can NOT play * * * Q-BSch. 


26 * . * . 

Kt-B3 

27 Q-Q6 

KtxB 

28 PxKt 

QR-KB1 

29 P-KR3 

■ k k i 

r first* 

29 . . . , 

B-B5 

39 R-Q1 

BxP 

31 Q-Q8 

Resigns 


There is no good way of parrying the threat- 
ened mate beginning with R-KtSch* If 31 * * * 
RxKt; 32 PxR* RxQ; 33 RxR mate* 


(From the Nieuwe Rotterdamsche COU- 

RANT) 






March, 1940 


31 


WOMEN IN CHESS 

LL S. Women’s Championship Tournament — 

This is the big news of the moment. 
It will be held in New York City* beginning 
late in April, at the same time and place as 
the U* S* Championship, and, like it, will be 
under the auspices of the U, S, of A, Chess 
Federation, It is particularly desired that wo* 
men from outside New York City participate. 
To encourage their entry places are being re- 
served for out-of-town women who have recog- 
nized standing in their community or who have 
had tournament experience. For the New York 
area there will be a qualifying tourney starting 
at the Marshall Chess Club on March 31. All 
enquiries should be addressed to Mrs* Frank 
J. Marshall, 23 W* 10th St 3 New York City. 

There are seven seeded players; Miss N. 
May Karff (champion) , Mrs. Mary Bain, Mrs. 
Gisela Gresser f Mrs. Raphael McCready, Mrs. 
Adde Rivero, Miss Edith Weart and Dr. Helen 
Weissenstein* All these players are well-known 
to those who follow the feminine chess news 
with the exception of Mrs, Gresser. She is 
a young woman who has been playing regu- 
larly at the Marshall Chess Club and who has 
been advancing rapidly. In a recent consola- 
tion club championship she made a very good 
score against a strong mixed field of men and 
women, outplacing Dr. Weissensteim She has 
earned her place among the seeded players* 

A. C. F. Women's Championship Play-off— 
You will remember that last summer the wo- 
men's tournament sponsored by the A. C, F. for 
the trophy donated by Mrs* Helen Cobb, re- 
sulted in a triple tie between Miss N, May 
Karff, Mrs, Mary Bain and Dr. Helen Weissen- 
stein. This is now being played off in a double 
round tournament at the Marshall Chess Club. 
At this moment, the odds are strongly in favor 
of Miss Karff who has won one game from 
each other opponents. Dr, Weissenstein and 
Mrs. Bain drew their individual game* The 
next two weeks will determine whether Miss 
Karff adds this trophy to the others she has 
acquired, 

— EL.W, 


TO CHESS 

The church, the knights and sovereignty, 

With castles for security; 

The pawns— they choose which they will be — 
The ranks, the files, for gallantry 
A fitting field. 

This game of life — hug danger, mates, 

And never yield* 


CHESS IN ENGLAND 

Despite the chastening effects of war with 
it s blackouts and rationing, there is still con- 
siderable chess activity in England, The Na- 
tional Chess Centre was opened in London in 
December, on a smaller scale than had origin- 
ally been anticipated, but it already has 360 
members. We wish this enterprise every suc- 
cess, and hope to see it grow substantially, 
despite the economic dislocations occasioned 
by war. For those of us who are dissatisfied 
with their club's quarters, the following phrase 
from the National Chess Centre's advertisement 
will give food for thought; “Large and well- 
appointed Air Raid Shelter on the premises." 

The Chess Centre got off to a fine start by 
staging the invitation tournament of the Hamp- 
stead Chess Club with a good entry* Final 


results were as follows: 

1.- 2* I. Koenig 7 Vz—Zhk 

1,- 2* P. S. Milner-Barry 7^ — 3^ 

3. Sir G. A* Thomas 7 —4 

4. P. M. List 4% 

5.- 7. M. Blum 6 —5 

5.- 7* S. Fazekas „„ 6 — 5 

5.- 7, Mrs* Stevenson 6 — 5 

8, H. Golombek ___ 5^—5^ 

9, Dr* Schenk 5 —6 

10, J. Mieses 4 —7 

11.-12. W. Ritsou Morry 

11,-12* J. D. Solomon _ 2^—8 ! k 


The usual Christmas Tourney took place at 
Hastings, but with a much weaker entry than 
the illustrious ones of former years. The win- 
ner was Frank Parr (not so long ago Boys' 
Champion of England) who was home on leave. 


Hampstead Invitation Tournament 1939 
INDIAN DEFENSE 


W. Ritson Morry P* S. Milner Barry 

White Black 


1 P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

20 R.KB1 

R-R1 

2 P-QB4 

P-K3 

21 P-Kt3 

BPxP 

3 Kt-QB3 

B-Kt5 

22 PxP 

PxP 

4 P-QR3 

BxKtch 

23 RxR 

RxR 

5 PxB 

0-0 

24 P-B4 

P-Kt7 

6 Q-B2 

P-Q3 

25 R-Q1 

Kt-B6 

7 P-K4 

P-K4 

26 PxP 

Q-K4 

8 B-Q3 

P-B4 

27 Q-K3 

P-Kt8(Q) 

9 P-Q5 

R-K1 

28 KtxQ 

QxPch 

10 Kt-K2 

QKt-G2 

29 K-Ktl 

Q-Kt6ch 

11 P-B3 

Kt-R4 

30 K-B1 

QxRPch 

12 B.K3 

Q-BS 

31 K-Ktl 

Q-Kt6ch 

13 Q-Q2 

P-KR3 

32 K-B1 

R-R7 

14 Kt-Kt3 

Kt-B5 

33 Kt-K2 

B-R5 

15 BxKt 

PxB 

34 R-B1 

Kt-K4 

16 Kt-K2 

Kt-K4 

35 K-Q2 

Q-Kt7ch 

17 0-0-0 

P-KKI4 

36 K-K1 

Q-Kt5ch 

IS P*K R4 

K-Kt2 

Resigns 


19 R-R2 

B-Q2 




Hampstead Invitation Tournament 1939 
FRENCH DEFENSE 
1* Koenig J* D, Solomon 

White Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K3 

8 Q-Q3 

P-QB4 

2 

P-Q4 

P-Q4 

9 0-0-0 

Kt-B3 

3 

Kt-Q B3 

Kt-KB3 

10 P-Q5 

Kt-K4 

4 

B-Kt5 

B-Kt5 

11 Q-Kt3 

B-Q2 

5 

PxP 

QxP 

12 Q-Kt7 

Kt-Kt3 

6 

BxKt 

PxB 

13 PxP 

PxP 

7 

Kt-K2 

Q-Q1? 

14 Kt-K4 

Resigns 


—Grace M. Watkins. 


32 


The Chess Review 


Modern Chess Dull?! 

By Fred Reinfeld 

It is unfortunate* but true* that a sizable 
proportion of amateurs find modem master 
chess dull. "Ah, the good old days!” This 
is based on what is for the most part an 
imaginary kind of chess which is supposed 
to have been peculiar to any age but our own. 
If the good old chess was really so interesting, 
we should expect it to have flourished in the 
first International Tournament* held at London 
in 1851* If we turn to the Rook of the Tourna- 
ment* however, we discover that it is an epochal 
collection of the most dreary, tedious, witless, 
planless, slovenly and inept chess that has ever 
been assembled beteween the covers of a book. 
Of the 85 games in the main event, not more 
than five could be described as brilliant by the 
most charitable man in the world; and he 
would be hard put to it to find ten games that 
were worth looking at. 

It is impossible to retain any more illusions 
about the chess of this period as one reads 
Staunton's peppery philippics against his 
bumble- fingered colleagues. (And since he was 
much inferior to present-day analysts, he leaves 
myriads of blunders untouched!) Listen to 
him: "In some respects these players were well 
paired, not for equality of force, indeed, Mr. 
Williams being by far the stronger, but be- 
cause each, in his degree, exhibits the same 
want of depth and inventive power in his 
combinations, and the same tiresome prolixity 
in maneuvering his men. It need hardly be 
said that the games, from first to last, are 
remarkable only for their unvarying and un- 
exampled dullness" (P. 88), 

And: "P-KB5 might have spared both parties 
some hours' tedium ' (P. 90) , 

And: "Mr. Ho r wit 2 has now an undeniable 
superiority, but in these games he only gains 
advantages to throw them away” (P, 127). 

And: "Would it be credited by any one un- 
acquainted with the names of the combatants, 
that the White men in this game were con- 
ducted by Mr. Horwitz? Would a player to 
whom Mr. Horwitz, when himself, could give 
a Knight, play in a style so utterly wanting in 
all that constitutes good chess, as Mr. H. does 
in the present termination?” (P. 128). Poor 
Horwitz has just capped a number of previous 
blunders by putting a piece en prise! 

And: "Contrary to all expectation, Black 
was enabled to bear up against the intolerable 
tedium of his adversary to the end of this 
trying game, but the effect of his exertions 
was painfully evident in the after parties” (P. 
155). 


And: "Mr. Szen is evidently not so well 
acquainted with the openings as with the end- 
games; this move ought to lose him a Pawn” 
P. 168) and on the fourth move, at that! And 
his opponent in turn, overlooks it! Master 
chess indeed! 

And: It can hardly fail to strike the most 
unobservant reader that in this match there 
is scarcely any combination on either side, Mr. 
Williams, with his habitual imperturbability, 
contents himself by keeping his game together, 
and exchanging his pieces as opportunity serves, 
satisfied to await the chances which a twelve 
or fourteen hours* sitting may turn up. The 
Hungarian, in despair of infusing anything 
like fire into such an unimaginative opposite, 
resigns himself to the far niente tactics of the 
enemy, and like him resolves to wait and watch 
also. The remarkable thing is, that with all 
this wariness and lack of enterprise, with hours 
upon hours devoted to the consideration of the 
shallowest conceptions, the games abound with 
blunders. In a game shortly preceding this 
one, Mr. W. leaves a Bishop en prise , In the 
present, we find Mr, L. very generously giving 
up his Queen, and in the very next game Mr. 
W, loses his Queen in a similar manner!” (P. 
277), 

But enough of these melancholy reminders 
of crass mediocrity* Let us examine another 
popular belief; what was the average length 
(in number of moves) of the 85 games con- 
tested in the main section of the Tournament? 
Tabulation of the game lengths shows that 
the format average duration is 42 moves, but 
quite a few games end with the cryptic remark 
"and wins,” Either the secretary fell asleep, 
or the loser continued to play on out of pique 
when his material disadvantage was colossal. 
It is therefore safe to assume that the average 
length was at least 45 moves. Now in modern 
tournament play, this would require an average 
of from four to six hours, which to the amateur 
seems inordinate; yet in 1851 there was no 
time limit, and we know that players took 
anywhere from half an hour to tivo and a half 
hours on a SINGLE move! Even offhand 
games were long drawn out, hence it is doubly 
certain that serious games proceeded at an even 
more funereal pace. We may therefore con- 
clude that the average game of 45 moves in the 
London Tournament took (at least) eight 
hours! I have purposely made my estimate a 
conservative one, for the chances are that the 
average length was much nearer to ten hours 
a game! Who would prefer this to modem 
chess?! 


March, 1940 


33 


AN UNSOUND COMBINATION 

BY AN DERSSEN 

"A particular point of attraction for Anders- 
sen proved to be a certain cider celiac situated 
in the heart of Berlin, and the particular magnet 
there was the youthful and very pretty daughter 
of the keeper, whose duty it was to serve the 
sparkling draught to her father's guests. Annie, 
as was the name of the charming girl, was also 
a chess player, and not averse to have now and 
then a game with our professor- The latter 
was, of course, too chivalrous to win many 
games, and managed generally to let his lovely 
adversary get the better of him, although she 
was, of course, no match for him, But on 
one occasion she had the temerity to gain two 
games in succession, which feat elated her to 
such an extent, that she ran excitedly around 
the room, telling everybody of her remarkable 
luck. This angered Anderssen. The lion within 
him had been roused, Annie w r as checkmated 
five times in rapid succession, which defeat 
made her so low spirited, that she sulkily re- 
treated from our table, and for a long time after 
refused to show herself in the bar-room.” 

r/f iff V td k bar* j Memoirs) 


The first newspapermen's chess tournament, 
held under the auspices of the Newspaper 
Guild of New York, got under way early in 
March, with employes of more than a dozen 
papers and press associations leaving their 
typewriters to take their positron behind a 
chess board. 

Seven games in the first round have already 
been played, although entries in the tourney, 
which is being held at the Newspaper Guild 
Club, 117 W. 46th St., are still being accepted. 

In this opening round, Melvin Barnet, a re* 
porter on the Brooklyn Eagle and formerly 
a member of the Harvard University Chess 
Team, defeated Nat Schaefer, of the Journal- 
American, 

Alton Cook, radio editor of the World- 
Tetegram and John Wagner, who covers City 
Hall for the Bronx Home News, played a draw 
after a hard-fought contest, A woman player, 
Felicia Lamport, member of the Newspaper 
Guild Women's Auxiliary, played a lively game 
but was not quite experienced enough to beat 
Jerome Frank, of the Journal- American. 

In another contest Paul Gardner, Journaf- 
American, defeated Robert Mayer, member-at- 
large. 

Chess was a game in which the late Heywood 
Broun, founder and president of the American 
Newspaper Guild, of which the New York Guild 
is a local, was deeply interested. 


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d.25 

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1.50 

505 

12.50 

5.00 

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Manhattan Chess Club Championship 


This year’s tourney was one of the most in- 
teresting in years, and the well-matched fleM 
produced a great deal of delightfully enter- 
prising chess. Although the tournament is still 
in progress as we go to press, Arnold &. Den- 
ker, New York State Champion, lias already 
made certain, of the first prize (12 — 2) with 
one more game left to play. The great disap- 
pointment of the tournament was the unexpec- 
tedly poor showing of Simonson— -hut if past 
performances are any criterion, this fore- 
shadows a fine performance by him in the com- 
ing U. -S. Championship Tourney! Detailed 
comment and the complete scores of the tour- 
ney will appear in .the next issue of The Chess 
Review, 


(Trap-comedy of errors!) 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 
0. Tenner A- C. Simonson 


White Black 


1 P-K4 

P-QB4 

14 PxP 

QR-Q1 

2 P-Q4 

PxP 

15 PxKil 

RxG 

3 KLKB3 

Kt-QB3 

16 QRxR 

BxP 

4 KtxP 

Kt-B3 

17 KLQ5 

Q-B1 

5 Kt-QB3 

P-Q3 

13 Kt-Kt6 

Q B2 

6 B-K2 

P-KKt3 

19 Kt-Q5? 

■ ■■ ■ j 

7 0-0 

B-Kt2 

R-Q7 3 wins 

T 

8 KLK13 

0-0 

19 . , , . 

Q-B1 

9 P-B4 

P-QR3 

20 KtxBch? 

■ H ■ ■ 

9 , , , P-QKt4 E ? is 

Better 20 Kt-Ktfi. 

interesting. 


20 ... . 

PxKt 

10 B-K3 

P-QKt4 

21 KtxB 

QxKt 

The idea 

of the Q. 

22 R-Q6 

Q-K2 

iianchetto : 

is su perfi- 

23 B-B5 

Kt-K4 

eially attractive, but 

24 B-Q5 

R-Q1 

may easily 

lead to a 

25 KRxP 

RxR 

lot of trouble, 

26 RxR 

KLQ6?? 

11 B-B3 

B“Kt2 

. . , Q-Kt4 

wins. 

12 P-K5! 

PxP 

27 RxPchl 

Resigns 

13 Kt-B5 

Q-B2 




(One of the most crucial games of the tour - 
nament , At the time it was played , Avram' s 
score u/as 7—l } hut fell off catastrophically 
after the present encounter .) 


Manhattan C. C, Championship 1939-1940 
MAX LANGE ATTACK 

(Notes by A, S, Denker) 


A, S, Denker 


H, Avram 


White 


Black 


1 P-K4 

2 Kt-KB3 

3 B«B4 

4 P Q4 

5 0-0 


P-K4 

Kt-QB3 

Kt-B3 

PxP 


Here I hoped to lead into the Canal Vari- 
ation: 5 . . . KtxP ; 6 R-Kl, P-Q4; 7 Kt-E3! 
5 . . , p B-B4 


But here Black foils my plan and practically 
forces- me to play either F-B3 or P-K5 (as in 
the game) in order to continue the attack. 


6 P-K5 F-Q4 

7 PxKt PxB 

8 R*K1ch B-K3 


9 Kt-Kt5 Q-Q4 

10 Kt-QB3 Q-B4 

11 QKt-K4 B-KB1 

Up until this, Black’s play from move 6 
was practically forced. But here he goes a- 
stray; instead, , , , 0-0-0 would have left a 
very playable game. 


Avram 



Denker 


12 P-KKt4 . , . . 

The Pawn cannot be taken, as after 12 , . . 
QxPch; 13 QxQ r BxQ; 14 PxP, BxP ; 15 Kt- 
B6ch and wins.. (This is unconvincing, as 
Black plays 15 . , K-Bl; 16 KtxB, P-KR4 ! 
or 16 KtxPch, RxKt; 17 KtxRch, K-Ktl ; IS 
Kt-Kt5, Kt-Kt5! with advantage to Black in 
either event. The correct move, by the way, 
was 12 KtxBPI— F.R.) 

12 Q-Q4 

If 12 . , . Q-kt3; '13 KtxB, PxKt; 14 P-B7chl 

13 KtxBPI KxKt 

14 Kt-Ktbch K-Ktl 

15 KtxB Kt-K4 

This looks strong, as it threatens a terrific 
check; of sterner stuff was * * . Q-Q3, hut I 
doubt if any move could stem the tide of the 
attack. 

16 P-B7ch! KxP 

17 Kt-Kt5ch K-Ktl 

On other K moves, P4B4 wins immediately. 
However, the text permits a pretty finish. 

18 RxKt [ QxR 

19 Q-B31 and wins 


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34 


March, 1940 


35 


(This game features some pretty tactical points.) 

ALEKHINE'S DEFENSE 


Dr. J. Platz 

A. S, Denker 

White 

Black 


1 P-K4 

Kt-KB3 

23 P-R4 

P-QKt3 

2 K1-QB3 

P-Q4 

24 R-QB3 

R-Q5 

3 PxP 

KtxP 

25 R-K1 

P-B3 

4 B-B4 

P-K 3 

26 P-Kt3 

Kt-K4 

5 Kt-B3 

KtxKt 

27 P-B4 

R-06 

6 KtPxKt 

Kt-Q2 

28 R(1)-QB1 

Kt-B6ch 

7 P-Q4 

B-K2 

29 K-Kt2 

Kt-K8ch 

8 0-0 

0-0 

30 K-B1 

Kt-B6 

9 Q-K2 

Kt-B3 

31 K-Kt2 

Kt-K8ch 

10 Kt-K5 

P-B4 

32 K-Bt 

Kt-B6 

11 R*Q1 

Q-R4 

33 RxR 

PxR 

12 R-Q3 

PxP 

34 R-Q1 

P-Q 7 

13 PxP 

B-Q2 

35 K-B2 

Kt-Q5 

14 &-KKt5 

B-Kt4 

36 RxP 

Kt-B3 

15 BxB 

QxB 

37 R-B2 

Kt-Kt5 

If now 16 

R-R6? Q- 

38 R-BSch 

K-B2 

Kill 


39 R-B7ch 

K-Kt3 

16 P-QB4 

Q-R5 

40 RxP 

K-B4 

17 R-KR3 

KR-Q1 

41 RxP 

P-R4 

18 P-Q5 

PxP 

42 R-KR7 

K-K5 

19 Kt-Kt4 

KtxKt 

43 RxP 

P-B4 

20 BxB 

QxBP 

44 R-R6 

Kt-Q4 

If 20 , , . 

R-Kl; £1 

45 P-R4 

K-Q5 

QxKt, RxB; 

22 Q-R4 

46 R-Q6 

K-B4 

wins. 


47 RxKtch 

KxR 

21 QxG 

PxQ 

48 P-R5 

K-Q3 

22 BxR 

RxB 

49 K-K3 

Resigns 

(The attack changes 

hands with kaleidoscopic 

swiftness*} 





RUY 

LOPEZ 


0. Tenner 

B. Blum in 

White 

Black 

1 P-K4 

P-K4 

16 BxKt 

BxB 

2 Kt-KB3 

K1-QB3 

17 KtxP 

B-R1 

3 B.Kt5 

P-QR3 

18 Q-Kt4 

B-B3 

4 B-R4 

Kt-B3 

19 Q-R3 

Q-K1 

5 0-0 

&-K2 

20 Kt{3)-Kt4 

Kt-K3 

6 P-Q4 

P-Q Kt4 

21 KtxB 

RxKt 

7 PxP 

KKtxP 

22 KR-K1 

P-Q3 

8 B-Kt3 

Kt-B4 

23 Kt-Q3 

R-Kt3 

9 B-Q5 

B-Kt2 

24 P-Kt3 

Q-B3 

10 P-B4 

0-0 

25 P-B4 

Q-R8ch 

11 Kt-R3 

P-K15 

26 K-B2 

Q-B6ch 

12 Kt*B2 

R-Ktl 

27 K-Ktl 

R-R31 

13 P-QKt3 

K-R1 

28 Q-B1 

Q-R8ch 

14 B-Kt2 

P-B3 

Resigns 


15 Kt-K3 

PxP 




Intercity Match, 1939 
(Erie, Pa,, vs, Jamestown, N. Y.) 
TWO KNIGHTS' DEFENSE 

Seiter Johnson 

White Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

11 QxKt 

K-B1 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

12 B-R6! 

P-KB3 

3 

B-B4 

Kt-B3 

If 12 . . 

. B-B3 ; 13 

4 

P-Q4 

PxP 

QxB, 


5 

0-0 

KtxP 

13 BxPch 

KxB 

6 

R-K1 

P-Q4 

14 RxBch 

K-Kt3 

7 

BxP 

QxB 

15 Q-Q3eh 

B-B4 

8 

Kt-B3 

Q-QR4 

16 Q-Kt3ch 

K-R4 

9 

RxKtch 

B-K2? 

17 Kt-K2 

Resigns 

■ 

. . B-K3 

is the 

If 17... 

QR-KKtl ; 

move. 


18 Kt-B4ch, 

, K-R3; 19 

10 

KtxP 

KtxKt 

Q-R4 mate. 



(Superb position play is topped off by a 
neat combination.) 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 


A* S. Pihkus J. Moskowitz 

Wihite Black 


1 P-K4 

P-QB4 

17 B-Kt6 

R-Q2 

2 Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

18 B-Q3 

P-K4 

3 P-Q4 

PxP 

19 P-B5 

P-Q4 

4 KtxP 

Kt-B3 

20 BPxP 

RPxP 

5 Kt-QB3 

P-Q3 

21 PxP 

KtxP 

6 B-K2 

P-K Kt3 

22 B*QB5 

R-K1 

7 0-0 

B-Kt2 

23 B-B4 

Kt-B5 

8 Kt-Kt3 

0-0 

24 Q-B2 

Q-Q1 

9 K-R1 

P-QR4 

25 P-Kt3 

Kt-K3 

10 P-QR4 

B-K3 

26 Kt-Q6 

R-B1 

11 P-B4 

BxKt 

27 KtxBP 

R-Q7 

12 PxB 

Q-Kt3 

28 KtxQ 

R(7)xQ 

13 B-B4 

QR-Q1 

29 BxKtch 

K-R2 

14 Q-K1 

P-K3 

30 RxR 

RxR 

15 B-K3 

Q-B2 

31 BxR 

Resigns 

16 Kt-Kt5 

Q-Ktl 



(Un remitting pressure 

leads to a nice 

finish.) 


BISHOP'S OPENING 


E. 8. 

Jackson 

J. Soudakoff 

White 

Black 


1 P-K 4 

P-K4 

18 K-Kt2 

Q-B1 

2 B-B4 

Kt-KB3 

19 Kt-K3 

Kt-B6 

3 P-Q3 

P-B3 

20 R-R1 

R-Q1 

4 Kt-KB3 

P-Q4 

21 Q-Kt3 

Kt-Q5 

5 PxP 

PxP 

22 Q-R4 

Q-K3 

6 B-Kt5ch 

B-Q2 

23 P-Kt3 

B-K4 

7 BxBch 

QKtxB 

24 R-QKtl 

QR-B1 

8 0-0 

B-Q3 

25 Kt-B4 

B-Ktl 

9 Kt-B3 

P-KR3 

26 B-K3 

Q*B4 

10 Kt-QKt5 

B-Ktl 

27 Kt-Q2 

RxKt 

11 P-B4 

0-0 

28 BxKt 

R-Q6 

12 R-K1 

R-K1 

29 BxKt 

RxKt 

13 Kt-B3 

PxP 

30 BxR 

QxPch 

14 PxP 

P-K5 

31 K-R3 

Q-84ch 

15 Kt-Q4 

Q-B2 

32 P-Kt4 

R-QGch 

16 P-KKt3 

QxBP 

Resigns 


17 Kt-B5 

Kt-K4 




Havana Tournament 1939 


QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 



F. Planas 

White 

1. Kashdan 

Black 

1 

P-Q 4 

Kt-KB3 

16 QR-Ktl 

P-B4 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K3 

17 P-QR4 

Kt-Q2 

3 

Kt-KB3 

P-Q4 

18 P-Kt5 

KtxKt 

4 

Kt-&3 

QK1-Q2 

19 PxKt 

RPxP 

5 

B-Kt5 

P-B3 

20 PxP 

R-R6 

6 

PxP 

KPxP 

21 PxP 

PxP 

7 

P-K 3 

B-K2 

22 Kt-Q4 

BxKt 

8 

B-Q3 

0-0 

23 PxB 

Q-R5 

9 

0-0 

R-K1 

24 R-Kt4 

P-B5 

10 

Q-B2 

Kt-BI 

25 P-B3 

Q-K2 

11 

P-QR3 

P-KKt3 

26 BxP 

PxB 

12 

P-Q Kt4 

P-QR3 

27 QxPch 

K-B1 

13 

BxKt 

BxB 

28 Q-R6ch 

K-Ktl 

14 

15 

KLQR4 

Kt-B5 

B-Kt2 

Q-K2 

29 Q-Kt6ch 

Drawn 


36 


The Chess Review 


Game Studies 


£7 * P P , B-Q4 

Some possible variations: 


(A most instructive game } with a delight jut 

combination that never happens!) 

Havana 1939 
FRENCH DEFENSE 
(Notes by L Kashdan) 


1. Kashdan 

White 

1 P-K4 P-K3 

2 P-Q4 P-Q4 

3 Kt-QB3 Kt-KB3 

4 B-Kt5 B-K2 

5 P-K5 KK1-Q2 

6 BxB QxB 

7 Q-Q2 P-QR3 


Paz 

Black 

8 P-B4 

9 Kt-B3 

10 P-KKt3 

11 Kt-K2 

12 P-Kt3 

13 B-R3 

14 0-0 


P-QB4 
Kt-QB3 
P-Q Kt4 
Kt-Kt3 
B-Kt2 
P-Kt3 
R QB1 


The game is taking a normal course for this 
opening* White is planning a K side advance, 
and Blaelc is countering on the other wing* 

15 R-B2 Kt-Q2 

16 R-K1 PxP 

17 KKtxP Kt~B4 

18 B-Kt2 KtxKt 

19 KtxKt Kt-K5 

A positional error. The writer stresses the 
general superiority of B over Rt, but in this 
position, with Black's Ps all on the same color 
as his B, the latter is very limited in scope. 
Tn addition the KP is weak, and will probably 
be lost in any resulting ending* 

20 BxKt PxB 

21 P-QKt4 

Important, to prevent * . . F-Kt5, which 


restrict White's 
l Kt-Kt3-B5. 

game, and also 

21 . * * . 

R-Q1 

22 P-B3 

Q-B2 

23 Q-K3 

P*KR4 

24 P-KR4 

0-0 

25 K-R2 

K-Kt2 

26 QR-KB1 

* * m * 


26 P-B5 is tempting, but after 26 * . * QxKP; 
27 P-B&ch, KhR 2; 28 Kt-B3, Q-Q4; 29 Kt Kt5ch, 
K-Ktl; 30 KtxP(K4), K-R2E (but not 30 * * * 
QxKt?? 31 Q-R6 wins) White can only draw. 

26 * . . * R-B1 

27 P-B5! ? 

Now this is in order, and with the extra 
force on the B file, it leads to a winning 
attack* 


Planas 



r 27 . * * QxBP; 2$ Q-Kt5i QxKt; 29 PxKP! 
(not 29 Px KtP, P-K6! 30 PxPch, K-R2 and 
White has only a perpetual check), P-B4 (if 
29 . . . R-B2; 30 P-K7, or 29 * . . PxP; 30 

RxR, RxR; 31 Q-K7ch and wins); 30 RxP, 
RxR; 31 RxR, R-B2; 32 R-B6 wins. 

II 27 . . . QxKP; 28 PxKP, P-B3 (the best 
chance; if 28 , * * PxP; 29 RxR, RxR; 30 Q~ 
Kt5! Q-Q3; 31 RxR, KxR; 32 Q-B6ch with a 
winning ending* 30 . . . QxQ? would lose a R 
in this variation after 31 , , * KtxPch. Or if, 
instead of 28 . * * PxP, Black plays 28 . * * P- 
B4; 29 KtxPch! RxKt; 30 RxR, PxR; 31 Q-Kt5 
ch, K-R2; 32 QxRPch, K-Kt2; 33 Q-B7ch fol- 
lowed by RxP wins); 29 R-B5! PxR; 30 RxP 
(not 30 KtxPch, K-Ktl; 31 Q-R6, R-QB2 when 
the game can be held), Q-B2; 31 RxRP, R-KR1 
(if 31 . . . K-Ktl; 32 Kt-R5 threatening Q-R6, 
wins); 32 Kt-B6ch, K-Kt3 (or 32 * . , K-Ktl; 
33 RxRch, KxR; 34 Q-R6ch, Q-R3; 35 QxPch, 
K-Ktl; 36 Kt-K7ch wins); 33 R-Kt5chM PxR 
(if 33 . , . K-R2; 34 R-Kt4I); 34 QxPch, K-R2; 
35 P-K7 and mate is soon forced, despite the 
two Rs minus! 

HI 27 . * . KPxP; 28 KtxPch! PxKt; 29 Q- 
Q-KtGch, K-R2 (or 29 . . * K-Rl; 30 Q-Bfich, 
any; 31 RxP wins); 30 QxBPch, K-Ktl; 31 
Q-Kt5ch, K-R2; 32 R-B6 forces mate. 

28 Q-Kt5 Q-Q1 

By this and the preceding move, Black has 
avoided all the violent threats, but through the 
following exchanges White obtains a fairly 
easy endgame win. 

29 PxKP QxQ 

30 PxQ . . * * 

Simpler than 30 RxPch, RxR; 31 RxRch, 
K-Ktl; 32 PxQ, BxKP, when Black has some 
counterplay. 


30 

a * v p 

PxP 

34 

K-Ktl 

K-K2 

31 

RxR 

RxR 

35 

Kt-R2 

P-K7 

32 

RxR 

KxR 

36 

K-B2 

B-B5 

33 

P-R3 

P-K6 

37 

KbK3 

■ ■ * ■ 


To bring the Kt to a stronger square without 
loss of time* (Sufficient to win, though re- 
quiring very accurate play, was 37 Kt-Q4, K- 
Q2; 38 KtxP(K2), BxKt (otherwise Kt-B4 and 
Black is helpless); 39 KxE ( K-B3; 40 K-Q3, 
K-Q4; 41 P-B4ch! KxP (if 41 . * * PxPch; 42 
K-B3, KxP; 43 KxP, followed by P-R4, wins); 
42 P-B5, K-Q4 ; 43 K-Q2, K-K4; 44 K-K3, K-Q4; 
45 K-B4, P-K4eh ; 46 K-B3! P-K5ch; 47 K-K3, 
K-K4 ; 48 P-B6, K-Q3; 49 KxP, KxP; 50 K-K5 
and wins. 


37 

■ ■ ■ ■ 

B-Q6 

42 

KtxRP 

K-Kt3 

33 

Kt-Kt2 

B-B5 

43 

Kt-B4ch 

KxP 

39 

Kt-B4 

K-Q2 

44 

KtxP(K2) 

K-B4 

40 

KtxKtP 

K-K1 

45 

K-K3 

KxP 

41 

Kt-B4 

K-B2 

46 

Kt-B4 

K-B4 


47 

Kt-Q3 


Resigns 


The threat is Kt-B5. 

If 

47 . . . K-Kt5; 4S 


Kt-K&ch and KtxB wins. Or 47 . . . BxKt; 48 
KxB, K-KtS; 49 K-K4 and White will reach 
the Q side first* 


Kashdan 



March, 1940 


37 


{Alekhine’s fme endgame play makes this 
game worthy of care fid study.') 

Buenos Aires Team Tourney, 1939 
COLLE SYSTEM (in effect) 

(Notes by Dr, M. Euwe) 

V, Mikenas Dr. A. Alekhine 

While Black 


1 P-Q4 P-K3 

4 P-QB3 G-B2 

2 Kt-Q2 P-Q4 

5 B-Q3 KbQB3 

3 P-K3 P-QB4 

6 KKt-B3 PxP 

Seeking to prevent P-K4, which would free 

White’s game. But the 

remedy is worse than 

the disease, for after the text White obtains a 

free game anyway, but 
any counter play, 

without leaving Blank 

7 KPxP 

B-Q3 

8 0-0 

Kt-B3 

9 R-K1 

B-Q2 

10 Q>K2 

■ PHI 

Gaining command of K5. 

IQ , . . . 

Kt-KR4 

11 P-KK13 

P-KKt3 

12 Kt-K5 

■ Alb 

White has a commanding position now. 

12 . * * i 

KtxKt 

13 PxKt 

B-K2 

14 Kt-Kt3 

Kt-Kt2 

15 B*R6 

KbB4 

16 BxKt 

..... 

Avoiding any dispute about the occupation of 
White's Q4 f but leaving Black with two Bs, 

16 ... . 

KtPxB 

17 Q-R5 

KR-Ktl 

18 E-B4 

R-Kt2 

Rather a clumsy way 

of protecting the KRP. 

If 19 Q-R6, B-KOl threatening . . . RxPeh. 

19 Kt-Q4 

0 - 0-0 

20 QR-Q1 

■ ■ ■ ■ 

Not 20 KtxBP, PxKt; 

21 P-K6, QxB etc. 

20 ... . 

Q-Kt3 

21 Q-K2 

B-B4 

22 B-K3 

K-Ktl 

23 Kt-Kt3! 

■ ■ » fh 

Simplifying to a favorable ending. 


Alekhine 



M i ken as 


23 ... , BxB 

24 QxB QxQ 

25 RxQ B-R5 


Grasping the opportunity to exchange the in- 
ferior B for the Kt. 

26 R-Q4 BxKt 

27 PxB R-Kt5 

23 P-KB4 


Rightly avoiding the exchange of Rs. There 
is now a strong threat of P-B4 followed by 
R(3)-Q3, 


28 * * . * 

P-KR4 

Counterattack is the onl 3 T 

drawing chance. 

29 P-B4 

P-R5 

30 BPxP 

RxQP 

31 RxR 

PxR 

32 K-B2 

PxPch 

33 PxP 

R-Kt3 

34 R-Q3 

R-Kt3 

35 RxP 

K-B2! 

Not 35 , . , RxP; 36 R-Q7, 

RxPch; 37 K-K3 

and White wins the BP with 

a strong passed 

KP. 

36 R-Q3 

R-KR3 

37 P-KKt4 

■ -■■I 

. Energetic play; but the more prudent K-Kt2 

might have offered better winning -chances. 

37 ... . 

PxP 

38 R-B3ch 

« fi i 1 

Not 3$ K-Kt3? R-R6ch. 

38 ... . 

K-Q2 

39 K-Kt3 

P-B4 

40 PxP e. p. 

RxP 

41 KxP 

R-Kt3ch 

42 K-B5 

R-K17 

Finally recovering the P; 

but White’s dan- 

gerous passed P still gives him winning 

chan ces. 

43 K-B6 

RxP 

44 P-B5 

P-Kt4 

45 R-Kt3 

K-Q3 

46 K-Kt7 

K-B4 

47 P-B6 

K-Kt5 

48 P-B7 

R-KB7 

49 R-Kt6 

■ m m -■ 

Or 49 RBS(Q)ch, RxQ; 50 

KxR, P4R4 and 

Black draws. 


49 ... . KxP 

50 R-KB6 R-Kt7ch 

51 R Kt6 

A winning attempt would he pointless, for 
after 51 K-R6, R-R7ch; 52 K-Kt5, R-Rl Black 
draws by pushing up the HP* 

51 , . , , R-KB7 

52 R-KB6 R-Kt7ch 

53 K-R7 R~R7ch 

54 K-Kt7 R-Kt7eh 

Drawn; an exciting ending, 

(Translated from the Haagsche Courant by 
J. B, 3.) 


{Whhe's over-optimistic altitude leads to 
his downfall.) 

Bournemouth, 1939 
INDIAN DEFENSE 


(Notes by Dr, M. Du we) 


S. Landau 
White 


E. Klein 

Black 


1 P-Q4 Kt-KB3 

2 P-QB4 P-K3 


38 


The Chess Review 


3 Kt-QB3 B-Kt5 

4 P-B3 P-Q3 

. , , P-Q4 is better, but Klein prefers a close 
position in this defense. The drawback to this 
policy is that White obtains a strong center. 

5 P-K4 0-0 

6 B-Q3 

Stronger is Kt-K2 followed by P-QiR3, 

6 . . . . P-K4 

The indicated counteraction, forcing White 
into a Close position* 

7 F-Q5 


7 Kt-K2, PxP; S KtxP, BxKtcli; 9 PxB would 
seriously weaken White's P position. 


7 ,. * * * P-QR4 

8 Kt-K2 B-QB4 


Black has brought about one of the most de- 
sirable features of this -defense; hindering 
White's development without having had to ex- 
change B for KL 


9 B-Kt5 QKt-Q2 

10 Q-Q2 Q-K1 

11 P-KKt4 

White's position in the center makes pos- 
sible a strong wing attack. 


11 

II lira 

12 Kt-Kt3 

13 Kt-B5 

14 B-K3 


K-R1 
Kt-KKtl 
P-KB3 
P-K Kt3 


Somewhat weakening, but there is no way 
for White to- exploit it. 


15 Kt-Kt3 BxB 

16 QxB Kt-B4 


A beautifully posted Kt 

17 P-KR4 Kt-K2 

18 0-0-0 * * * . 


18 P RG was better, in order to blockade the 
K side. 

18 * , * . P-B4I 


A strong move which gives Black the initia- 
tive. 

19 KPxP PxP 

20 R-B4? 

PxP was indicated. 


Klein 



Landau 


£0 * , , , Kt-Kt3I 

The ensuing win of the KBP forms the later 
basis for a won game* 


21 BxP 

22 Q-Q4ch 

23 BxB 

24 RxQ 


PxP 
Q-K4 
QxQ 
PxKt ! 


Much stronger than RxB. The text gives? 
Black a dangerous passed P. 

25 B-B5 Kt-K4 

26 R-Q1 


Black threatened to win the exchange by , , * 
P-Kt7 followed by . . * Kt-B'6. 

26 . . * * P-R4 ! 


Undermining the position of the B so as to 
be able to open the KB file* This enhances the 
passed P's importance in a decisive manner. 

27 KbK2 P-Kt7 

28 KR-Ktl PxP - 

29 Kt-Q4 

After 29 B-B£, R-B7 followed by * , . Kt-B6 
wins, Or S3 Kt-Kt3, RxB; 30 KtxK, R-KB1 and 
31 * * . R-B7* (This latter line Is inadequate 
because of 31 KI-K3. The most convincing 
reply to 29 Kt-KtB would be simply 29 * . . Kt 
xP! with a winning game. — F. R,) 

29 * * * * Kt-B6 

Winning a piece, 

30 RxP KtxKt 

31 BxP R-BS 


White could have 

resigned here. 

The re- 

maining moves were: 



32 K-Q2 

R-K1 

43 K-B3 

R-R6ch 

33 B-R5 

Kt-B6ch 

44 K-Kt2 

P-R5 

34 BxKt 

RxB 

45 R-Kt5 

R-R4 

35 R{1 )-Kt1 

R-B3 

46 R-Ktl 

R-B4 

36 P-Kt3 

Kt-Q2 

47 P-Kt5 

K-R2 

37 R-Kt5 

R-R3 

48 R-Kt2 

P-Kt3 

33 P-R5 

Kt-B3 

49 K-B3 

R-B6eh 

39 R-B5 

R-K4 

50 K-Kt4 

Kt-K5 

40 RxR 

PxR 

51 R-Q Kt2 

Kt-B4 

41 P-R3 

RxP 

52 P-Q6 

Kt.Q6ch 

42 P-Kt4 

R-R7ch 

Resigns 



(Translated from the “Haagsche Courant” 

by J,B.S.) 


Book Reviews 

FRED REINFELD: LIMITED EDITIONS 

Volume X : The Ventnor City Tournament 

Price: SI. 25 

This is the latest and, we are told, probably 
the last, of Reinfeld’s limited edition series. 
It is a worthy record of one of the most in- 
teres ting American tourneys of recent years, 
with annotations to the 66 games by Sidney 
Bernstein, A. E. Santasiere, Milton Hanauer 
(the winner) and Reinfeld. The notes are 
enlivened by many humorous touches, in con- 
trast to the rather portentous character of most 
chess books. Since the Ventnor City Tour- 
nament may be an annual fixture, we are look- 
ing forward to a series of books on the tourneys 
of this American counterpart of the Hastings 
and Margate Tournaments. 


Famous Last Round Tourney Thrills 

By Paul Hugo Little 


MATT 1 SON-SPI E LM ANN, Carlsbad, 1929 

In the annals of tournament chess, there are 
innumerable instances where luck, and the 
combination of other psychological factors, 
played a decisive part. Since chess involves 
the human element, human failings are as pos- 
sible as human triumphs, 

And in the last rounds of fierce competitions 
where the strain is greater, lapses in judgment 
or amazing recoveries are equally possible, It 
is but necessary to mention the Vienna 1908 
tournament as an example of the latter. Mar- 
oczy and Schlechter had already finished their 
schedule tied for first. Duras could make it 
a triple tie if he won his game. Von Barde- 
leben, his opponent, held him move after 
move until all chances seemed to he gone. But 
suddenly Bardeleben made a blunder and lost 
a game he could normally have drawn. 

And. as an example of lapses in judgment, 
we may take the game played between Rudolf 
Spielmann and Herman Mattison in the Carls- 
bad 1929 tournament. It conforms to Dr. 
Tarraschs pithy maxim: rr It is not enough 
to have a won game; one must win it also,” 
The translation of a winning advantage into 
ultimate victory is platitudinously called "a 
matter of technique/’ But there are occasions 
when nerves and brain interfere with technique, 
and defeat ultimate victory, Our game study 
is a case in point. 

The Carlsbad 1929 Tournament was a mem- 
orable event in chess history. It was the fourth 
international tournament held at Carlsbad under 
the direction of Victor Tietz, whose organic 
zational powers were as great as his own chess- 
playing ability. Because of the ideal playing 
conditions, large prize fund, and exemplary 
treatment of all participants, the three previous 
congresses at Carlsbad had produced superb 
chess battles. The first, in 1907, had been won 
by Rubinstein, who had only been playing 
two years in master chess tournaments; the 
second in 1911, marked Teichmann’s sensa- 
tional triumph in a field of twenty-six, including 
the young Alekhine, and the third, in 1923, 
had resulted in a triple tie between the same 
Alekhine, then risen to fame as champion 
of Europe, Bogolubov and Maroczy, 

In 1929 every effort was made to give the 
players a keen incentive. A liberal prize fund 
was provided and there were many brilliancy 
and consolation prizes. Tietz was again di- 
rector. 


The field was tremendously strong. Alek- 
hine was absent because of training for his 
world title match with Bogolubov, Dr. Lasker 
had withdrawn from tournament chess some 
years before. Unfortunately for chess, Richard 
Reti, who had been invited, succumbed to an 
attack of scarlet fever, But virtually every 
outstanding player was entered. There were 
Rubinstein, Vi dinar, Nimzovich, Euwe, Capa- 
blanca, Spielmann, Maroczy, Marshall, Bogol- 
yubov, (who entered despite his forthcoming 
match with Alekhine), Gruenfeld, Tartakover, 
Code, Saemisch, and others who could be de- 
pended on for excellent chess combat. An 
added attraction was the entry of the women's 
world champion, Vera Menchik. 

All in all, twenty-two competitors sat down 
to play the opening round on Wednesday, July 
31st 

Spielmann began like a whirlwind, intent 
upon sweeping through the tournament. He 
abandoned his beloved PK4 for the quieter 
P-Q4, but his opponents found him no easier 
on that account. In the first five rounds he 
beat Gruenfeld, Marshall, Saemisch, Gilg, and 
Colle, decisively. In these games he demon- 
strated his dazzling attacking ability and a 
superlative end-game technique. 

Rubinstein had four points after five rounds, 
and Vidnaar and Paul Johner had 3]/ 2 each. 
Nimzovich, losing to Yates in the fifth round, 
had a score of 2V 2 and Capablanca had begun 
somewhat tamely with five straight draws 
(against Tartakover, Thomas — to whom he 
should have lost — , Rubinstein, Bogolyubov, 
and Canal). 

After five more rounds, the spectators were 
willing to concede the first prize to Spielmann, 
He had drawn with Vldmar in the sixth round 
and with Tartakover in the ninth, and beaten 
Johner, Maroczy and Thomas for a score of 
9 out of 10. Capablanca was second wuth 7, 
having scored four wins and a draw against 
Euwe (who should have beaten him), Vid- 
mar also had 7 points in ten rounds, losing 
only one game to Johner in the fifth round. 
Johner appeared to be Vidmar's nemesis, having 
beaten him at the 1907 and 1911 meetings, 
Nimzovich and Bogolyubov were tied for fourth 
with GV % each. But Spielmann^ whirlwind 
activities were checked in the next five rounds. 
He could score only two points, losing to 
Canal and Rubinstein, Capablanca with 4 
points tied Spielmann with II points in 15 
rounds; Nimzovich, playing steadily, had 10 


39 


4o 


The Chess Review 


points. Rubinstein, who had lost his only 
game of the tournament to Gilg in the 8th 
rounds had 9^, a score equalled by Dr. Vid- 
mar, Tartakover had the unusual score of 
12 draws, 2 losses and one win, that being 
against Bogolubov m the fourteenth round and 
winning him a spectator's prize for the first 
game to be won in that round. 

The next six rounds would decide the tour- 
nament. In the 16th round, Capablanca made 
a terrible oversight, losing a piece and the 
game to Saemisch. Spielmann drew with Becker 
to maintain first place with ll 1 /^ points; Nim- 
zovich beat Gilg to tie Capablanca -for second 
with 11. 

In the X 7th roundj Capablanca beat Gilg in a 
fine game, while Spielmann drew with Euwe, 
Nimzovich drew with Colie, and Rubinstein 
beat Canal. Scores after 17 rounds were Capa- 
blanca and Spielmann, 12; Nimzovich 1 1 ]/ 2 ; 
Rubinstein 11; Vidmar 10 1^; and Gruenfeid 
10 . 

In the 18th round Capablanca beat Colie, 
Spielmann beat Treybal, and Nimzovich beat 
Vidmar. Saemisch mined Grtienfeld's chances 
by winning a game that was awarded first 
brilliancy prize. 

In the 19th round, Nimzovich tied Capa- 
blanca for first place by beating Spielmann, 
while Capablanca could only draw against 
Vidmar. Rubinstein took fourth place with 
12l^ beating Miss Menchik. 

In the 20th and semi-final round Spielmann 
met Capablanca and beat him in a splendid 
game. It was the second time Spielmann had 
beaten the Cuban, having won at Kissengen 
the year before. Nimzovich drew a hard game 
with Maroczy, and Rubinstein drew with 
Becker. 

So the 2 1st and last round opened with Nirra 
zovich and Spielmann tied for first with 14 
each, Capablanca third with 13i/2> and Rubin- 
stein fourth with 13 + 

Euwe drew a short game with Rubinstein. 
Nimzovich soon got an advantage against Tar- 
takover, and won in 53 moves. Capablanca 
concluded brilliantly with a quick win over 
Maroczy. But Spielmann, who had to win to 
tie for first, missed his way against Mattison, 
and so tied Capablanca for second, while Nim- 
zovich scored his greatest tournament victory. 

And here is the game which illustrates Tan 
rasch’s famous maxim and proves that anything 
may happen in the last round! 


FRENCH DEFENSE 


R. Spielmann 

Black 


4 B-K Kt5 

5 P-K5 

6 BxB 


B-K2 

KKt-Q2 

QxB 


H, Mattison 

White 

1 P-K4 P-K3 

2 P-Q4 P-Q4 

3 Kt-QB3 Kt-KB3 

7 Q-Q2 .... 

White has played one of the soundest 
variations against the French, although it gives 
Black less difficulty than the Alekhine attack 
in over-the -board play. 

7 ... ■ 0-0 

8 Kt-Q1 .... 

He does not care for S P-KR4, F-QB4; 9 
Kt-Kt5, P-QR3! after recalling Yates' experi- 

ence with this line against Spielmann. himself 
at Kissengen 1928. 

8 . , . . P-QB4 

9 P-QB3 Kt-QB3 

10 P-KB4 P-B3 

11 Kt-B3 .... 

PxP is -customary here, but Mattison had in 
mind a specially prepared variation. 

11 , , . . PxQP 

12 PxQP PxKP 

13 BPxP Kt-Kt3 

Spielmann 1 ? aggressive nature would nor- 
mally induce him to play 13 . . * RxKt; 14 
PxR, Q-R5eh; 15 Q-E2, KtxQP, but he sees 
that Mattison expects the sacrifice and is prob- 
ably prepared for it, having purposely steered 
into it Such deductions as these are termed 
"psychological" by the phlegmatic annotator; 
however, in tournament play, they often mean 
the difference between a prize and none. Chess 
has its material side as well. 

14 B-K2 B-Q2 

15 0 0 B-K1 

16 B-Q3? .... 

Bad. If White wanted the B at this square 
he should have moved it there on his 14th 
move. But the B belongs at K2 so that if, 
after Black plays . , . B-R4 threatening BxKt, 
White can reply BxB, Best here was 16 Kt-K3 + 

16 ... . B-R4 

17 B-Ktl .... 

Already he has a cramped and inferior po- 
sition as a result of the wasted tempi with 
the B. 

17 ... . BxKt 

18 PxB Kt-B5 

19 Q-Q3 Q-R5 

20 P-KB4 P-KKt4! 


Smacking the weakened K side. Black should 
now win. But the goddess of luck is now 
hovering at Mattison’s side of the board. 

21 P-KtS Kt-R6 

22 Kt-K3 .... 

A last defensive hope, but it should not 
prevail. 


(see Diagram) 

22 , KtxB?? 

Here is the turning point of the game. With 
one careless move, Spielmann throws away 
his win and a few thousand kronen. The B 
is harmless where it is, and moreover it ob- 
structs the Q'R, 

The clear winning way was 22 , , . RxP! 23 
RxR, PxR; 24 Kt-Kt2, Q-R3 ; 2-5 P-QKt4, Kt- 
B5! 26 P-Kt5, Kt-K2; 27 B-B2, R-KB1 ; 28 R- 


■4 


March, 1940 


41 


Spielmann 






Mattieon 


KBI, P-B6 and White is lost It .25 KtxP, 
KtxB; 26 Q-KtSch, K-Rl; 27 .RxKt, R-KKtl 


is also hopeless for White, 

23 Kt-Kt21 Q-Kt5 

24 GRxKt PxP 

25 P-KR3 Q-B4 

Also after 2S . . . Q-Kbi; 2(5 R-KB3 Black 
could hardly expect a win. 

26 QxQ RxQ 

27 RxP RxR? 


He had hotter chances with QR-KB1. 


28 KtxR KtxQP 

29 R-G1 Kt-B6ch 

30 K-B2 KtxKP 


At first glance 30 . , . Kt -KM; 31 P-KR4, 
KGKGch with . . . K-B2 seems very strong. 
But White plays instead 31 R-KKtl! Now the 
game is drawn and Spielmann must content 
himself with a tie for second place, 


31 KtxKP R-K1 

32 Kt- B4 Drawn 


Our next issue will feature games from the 
Marshall Chess Club Championship and the 
Metropolitan Chess League Matches; the an- 
notations will be by some of America's leading 
masters. 


MASSACHUSETTS NOTES 

Ralph H. Rowse of Bedford, Mass., was 
elected president of the Massachusetts State 
Chess Association at the annual meeting at the 
Boston City Club on Washington's Birthday, 
and Godfrey L. Cabot of Boston was elected 
Honorary President of the Association. Both 
of these gentlemen are well known in Boston 
as enthusiastic patrons of the game and the 
M + S.aA, is fortunate in being under their 
leadership: 

Mr, Rowse takes the place of Mr. George 
Sturgis who has been at the head of the M.-S. 
C.A. since it was organised some years ago, 
but who is now president of the United States 
Chess Federation, which position, of -course, 
will require his undivided attention. 

The annual State championship tournament 
was started with sixteen players competing 
for the title. Other features of the meeting in- 
cluded a rapid transit in which 2d took part 
and resulted in a 3-cornered tie between Dr-, 
Kata, Weaver w, Adams and Fred X Keller, 

SOUTHERN MASSACHUSETTS 

New York's “Grand Old Man of Chess,” 
Frank X Marshall, favored Boston with a visit 
last month where he was a guest at the home 
of Theodore L, Shaw of Wellesley and on the 
following day was a dinner guest at the Har- 
vard Club of Boston, In a simultaneous exhi- 
bition against some of the strongest local 
talent he won 19, drew 10 and lost 2 games. 

The above title has been given to a new 
chess organization which includes a dozen 
cities and towns in that section, many of which 
were formerly in the Old Colony League which 
also took in more distant places in Rhode Is- 
land. Geographically, of course, it will enable 
the various clubs to compete with each other 
without the inconvenience of travelling greater 
distances. 


The championship tournament of the Bronx 
Chess Club has been won -by A. L, Friedman 
with a score of 1.1— 2 1 



INLAID 

CHESS TABLE 

Handsome — Sturdy 

Choice of 

OAK MAHOGANY WALNUT 

Diamond-matched Table Top 
2J4" squares of Maple and Walnut 
Height 30" Top 30" x 30" 

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• 

Order from 

THE CHESS REVIEW 

25 W. 43rd St. New York, N. Y. 



42 


The Chess Review 


My Favorite End Game 
Compositions 

By Irving Chernev 


Troitsky 



White to Play and Win 


A beautiful setting to the classic theme of 
Saavedra, 

b 


1 

P-R7 

R-Kt4+ 

2 

KxP 

RxP 

3 

K-B7 

B-K3 

4 

K-Kt8 

B-Q4 

5 

RxB 

RxR 

6 

PxR(R) 

R-Q3 

7 

K-B7 and wins 



Birnoff 



White to Play and Win 


Black defends skilfully, but just when all 
seems safe, he gets a shock! 


1 

P-Q7 

B-B3 

2 

P'R6 

Kt-Kt5 

3 

P-Q8 (Q) 

BxQ 

4 

B-Q4 

Kt-Q6+ 

6 

K-B3 

Kt B5 

6 

KxKt 

B-Kt4+ 

7 

K~B5 

BxP 

8 

9 

B-B2+ 

P-Kt4-| — j- 

K-R4 


Gorgiev 



White to Play and Win 


The remarkable promotion will delight all 
followers of Kashdan, 


Gruber 



White to Play and Win 

In which a lowly pawn administers the 
death blow! 


1 P-B5+ 

KxP 

1 K-B5 

Q-B1 

2 Kt-R6+ 

RxKt 

2 Kt-Kt7+ 

QxKt 

3 P-B7 

Kt^Kt4+ 

3 B-K8+ 

Q Kt3+ 

4 BxKt 

KxB 

4 BxQ-f 

PxB-{- 

5 R.R4+ 

K- Kt3! 

5 KxP 

P-Kt4 

6 P-B8(B) 1 ! 

any 

6 K-B5 

P-KtG 

7 BxR and wins 


7 PxP++ 





March, 1940 


43 


(A terrific battle) 

Manhattan C. C. Championship 1939-1940 
RETI OPENING 


A. C. Simonson 

H. Avram 

White 


Black 


1 Kt-KB3 

P-Q4 

36 B-B3 

KtxPch 

2 P-KK13 

Kt-KB3 

37 K-B1 

Q-Q2 

3 B-Kt2 

P-B3 

38 R-KB6 

Q-B2 

4 0-0 

B-B4 

39 R-Q1 

Q-B5 

5 P-Q3 

P-KR3 

40 R-Q8ch 

K-R2 

6 QKt-Q2 

P-K3 

41 R(2) -Q2 

QxB 

7 P-B4 

Q Kt-Q2 

42 RxB 

Q-B5 

8 PxP 

BPxP 

43 R(2)-Q8 

Q-Kt6 

9 Kt-Kt3 

B-K2 

44 R- R 8c h 

K-Kt2 

10 B-B4 

0-0 

45 R(Kt8)-Kt8ch 

11 R-B1 

Q-Kt3 


K-B3 

12 Q-B2 

QR-B1 

46 RxPch 

K-K2 

13 QxR 

RxQ 

47 RxKt 

QxRch 

-14 RxRch 

K-R2 

48 K-B2 

Q-R7ch 

15 P-KR3 

P-K4 

49 K-B1 

Q-K4 

16 B-K3 

Q-R3 

50 K-B2 

QxP 

17 R-B2 

QxRP 

51 BxP 

BxP 

18 KKt-Q2 

Q-R3 

52 B-Q5 

K-B3 

19 P-K Kt4 

B-K3 

53 R-QRS 

B-B1 

20 R-R1 

Q-Kt4 

54 R-QR4 

B-Q2 

21 P-Q4 

P-K5 

55 R-B4 

Q-Q3 

22 RxP 

B-Q3 

56 B-33 

K-Kt2 

23 R-R5 

Q-K13 

57 B-Kt4 

Q-R7ch 

24 R-R1 

B-Ktl 

58 K-B1 

BxB 

25 R(1)-QB1 

Q-Q3 

59 RxB 

K-Kt3 

26 Kt-Bl 

P-KKt4 

60 Kt-Kt2 

P-B4 

27 Kt-B5 

KtxKt 

61 R-Q4 

Q-K4 

28 PxKt 

Q-B3 

62 R*Q3 

P-Kt5 

29 B-Q4 

Kt-Q2 

63 P*K3 

Q-Kt7 

30 P-B3 

Kt-K4 

64 Kt-B4ch 

K-Kt4 , 

31 PxP 

PxP 

65 K-K1 

P-Kt6 

32 Kt-K3 

Kt^Kt3 

66 R-Q2 

Q-B8ch 

33 P-Kt4 

Kt-B5 

67 K-K2 

K-Kt5 

34 P-Kt5 

QxP 

Resigns 


35 BxPch 

K-Ktl 



(Typically energetic play by Marshall ) 


INDIAN 

DEFENSE 


D, Polland 

F- J. Marshall 

White 


Black 


1 P-QB4 

Kt-KB3 

13 R-Q1 

P-R3 

2 Kt-KB3 

P-KKt3 

14 P-QR4 

R-K1 

3 Kt-B3 

B-Kt2 

15 Kt.QS 

P-QKt4 

4 P-K4 

P-Q3 

16 BP xP 

PxP 

5 P-Q4 

0-0 

17 PxP 

R-Ktl 

6 B-K2 

QKt-Q2 

18 Q-B4 

Kt-K4 

7 P-KR3 

P-K4 

19 QxP 

KtxBch 

8 PxP 

QKtxP 

20 PxKt 

RxP 

9 B-Kt5 KtxKtch 

21 B-Kt6 

Q-R1 

10 BxKt 

B-K3 

22 Kt-K3 

Q-R3 

11 Q-Kt3 

P-KR3 

23 RxP 

RxP 

12 B-K3 

Kt*Q2 

24 Resigns 



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THE CHESS REVIEW 

25 W. 43rd STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 


New York 1939 (Exhibition Game) 
VIENNA GAME 


S. Reshevsky 

(Blindfold) Allies 


White 

Black 


1 P-K4 

P-K4 

24 P-Q4 

B-B2 

2 Kt-QB3 

Kt-QB3 

25 P-K5 

Q-Q2 

3 B-B4 

B-B4 

26 P-KKt4 

QR-K1 

4 P-Q3 

Kt-B3 

27 B-Ktl 

B-Q1 

5 B-KKtS 

P*KR3 

28 R-B6 

BxR 

6 B-R4 

B-K2 

29 RxB 

P-KR4 

7 B-KKt3 

P-Q3 

30 B-B5 

PxB 

8 P-B4 

B-Kt5 

31 PxBP 

R-KKtl 

9 KKt-K2 

K1-KR4 

32 Q-K3 

K-B1 

10 0-0 

KtxB 

33 P-K6 

Q-K2 

11 PxKt 

0-0 

34 Q-R6ch 

R-Kt2 

12 P-R3 

Kt-Q5 

35 RxPch 

QxR 

13 Q-Q2 

KtxKtch 

36 PxQ 

KxP 

14 KtxKt 

BxKt 

37 QxPch 

K-B1 

15 QxB 

P-B3 

38 P-B6 

R-K8ch 

16 K-R1 

B-B3 

39 K-R2 

R-Ktl 

17 P-B3 

Q-K2 

40 Q-R6ch 

K-B2 

18 Q-R5 

QR-Q1 

41 Q-R7ch 

K-B1 

19 B-R2 

K-R2 

42 P-B4 

R-K5 

20 R-B3 

P-K Kt3 

43 PxP 

PxP 

21 Q-R3 

K-Kt2 

44 QxP 

R-K3 

22 QR-KB1 

P-Q4 

45 QxQP 

RxP 

23 PxKP 

BxP 

46 Q-R8ch 

Resigns 


Greenwich Village ^ U II JUI I P Rendezvous of 

Landmark ^ * jfrl liEr I 9 Celebrities 

Where Chessplayers Find a Friendly Club-like Atmosphere 
WINES • BEERS * LIQUORS 
Excellent Cuisine - Dinners 65c * — $1.00 

Chess and Games Paraphernalia Always Available 
Experts* Night Every Monday 

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Telephone CH 2-9512 Christopher St, IRT subway station 


Problem Department 

By Vincpnt L. Eaton 

Address all correspondence relating to this department to KX, Eaton, 2237 Q Street, N,W, f Washington, D.C. 
Questions About Problem Matters Will Be Answered If Accompanied By Return Postage. 


This month we are pleased to present an 
interesting; essay by Mr. Aurel Tauber on a 
piquant switchback theme* As I said some 
time back, papers of this type are most wel- 
come, not merely because of the enjoyment 
they afford, but because they stimulate com- 
posers to further experiment. Moreover, a 
department continuously conducted by one man 
is bound sooner or later to reflect some of 
his own preferences and. prejudices. Last year 
a book was published that accomplished the 
rather stupid stunt of not using the letter "e” 
a single time* It seems to me that editors 
would give their readers more “ease 1 ’ if they 
would sometimes omit the ‘T* # s* Welcome, 
Mr. Tauber I 

THE CQRNTSR-TO- CORNER 
SWITCHBACK THEME 

By Aurel Tauber 

If the key piece in a two-mover returns 
later to its original square we call this move 
a “switchback/* Among all possible switch- 
backs the most fascinating seems to occur 
when the key piece moves from corner to 
corner, back and forth over eight squares. 

In No. 1555, the White Queen in the main 
variation returns to her original position after 
visiting another corner of the board. Although 
No. 1556 (a twin brother of 1555) does not 
belong to this type, it may still be of interest 
to the reader, because it shows the Queen 
covering the smallest possible range in her 
switchback move* 

In a two-mover without the use of any cap- 
ture there is only one way by which the key 
piece can be forced back to its original corner 
from another corner in order to mate — -by the 
help of a black Pawn situated diagonally in 
relation to the Black King, as shown in No. 
1555. The key piece must be a Queen moving 
laterally* After its own move the Black Pawn 
cannot interfere with the mate. 

By using a capture by Black we cau easily 
show the corner-to-corner switchback of White 
Rook. This capture may be made either by 
the Black King (No. 1557) or by any other 
Black piece (e,g*, No. 1558)* 

A White Bishop moving from corner to cor- 
ner cannot mate because its resting-places are 
on the board edge. Therefore the White Bish- 
op's corner-to-corner switchback can only be 
shown by using an extra move to mate. (No. 
1559) 

The next step in our analysis is to combine 
the theme elements. This w r e do either by 
using two pieces, each of which performs one 
switchback, or by using one piece that does 
two switchbacks on two different lines* The 
White Queen standing on one corner can 
move in three different directions to create 
switchbacks. To combine the three different 
moves of White Queen in a single problem 


would be the maximum task for a three-mover. 
No. 1550 has two thematic variations, showing 
the Queen’s switchback horizontally and dia- 
gonally combined. In a third variation the 
Queen does a simple vertical corner-to-corner 
move* 

We can also double the theme. In No. 1661 the 
Queen moves laterally three times between 
two corners, — a double switchback* The same 
type of doubling for a Queen moving diagonally 
was shown in No. 1899 (Chess Review, July- 
August, 1939). 

Thus far, captures by Black have been used 
to force the switchbacks. But the theme has 
a much larger field if capture by White is 
made the mechanism. In No* 1562 we have 
the theme in its multiple form* The White 
Rook moves six times between two corners 
— a quintuple switchback. 

The theme in its complex form would require 
at least four moves. The White Queen or 
Rook starting from one corner would visit 
two others and then return to its home corner, 
covering the same route twice. The maximum 
accomplishment of the theme would possibly 
be an eight-mover in which a White Queen 
or Rook would start from one corner, make 
a "merry-go-round” visit of all the corners, 
and then do the same merry-go-round in the 
opposite direction, 

(A simple merry-go-round, involving switch- 
back only to the original square, is Shinkman’s 
classic four-mover; R7, P7, klK5, 8, S, 8, 8, 
7s. Solution: 1 Rh8, KxP; 2 RxS, KbS; 3 Ral, 
KcS; 4 Ra8—Edi tor’s note.) 

To the complex form of the theme would 
also belong a White Knight switchback be- 
tween two corners. This would require ten 
steps* 

Another aspect of the theme is shown in 
No. 1563, where the simple switchback occurs 
as a Black maneuver* 

* # # # * 

We devote our Quoted Section to the work 
of Alain C. White, America’s great composer, 
patron, and critic of Chess problems, who 
celebrates his sixtieth birthday on March 3rd. 

INFORMAL LADDER 

(Maximum score for Nos, 1492-1509: 45) 

*A. Sheftel 883, 43; ^F. Sprenger 885, 31; 
W. O, Jens 812, 40; T. McKenna 764, 31; *W. 
Patz 756, 23; L. Rothenberg 640, 43; 

*J. Hannus 620, 43; K. Lay 571; I, Bum 567; 
G* Fairley 522, 40; **l, Bu rate in 518, 38; A, 
Tauber 476, 43; Dr, M, Herzbenger 500; A, A, 
J. Grant 399, 28; J, M, Dennison 407, 18; Dr, 
W. F, Sheldon 386, 37; B. M* Marshall 404; 
****Dr. G* Dobbs 374, 43; I. Sapir 289, 39; P* 
A, Swart 287, 34; 514 Dr. P, G. Keeney 263, 43; 
««H. B. Daly 211, 40; ***l. & M, Hochberg 
151, 43; J, Donaldson 155; *E. Korpanty 108 f 
40; A, Fortier 99, 36; E. Popper 93, 43; S. P. 
Shepard 117; R. Neff 101; ****©. Plowman 51, 


44 


M A RCH, 19 4 0 


45 


No, 1.546 

WALTER B. SUESMAN 
Cranston, FL L 



Mate in 2 


No. 1547 

WALTER B. SUESMAN 
Cranston, R, I. 



Mate in 2 


No, 1548 

EDWARD L. DEISS 
Covington, Ky. 



Mate in 2 


Original Section 


No. 1649 

G, FAIRLEY 
New York, N. Y. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1550 
F. GAM AGE 
Brockton, Mass. 



Mate in 2 


No, 1551 
DR. J. HANSEN 
Copenhagen, Denmark 



Mate in 2 


No. 1552 

DR. P. G. KEENEY 
Bellevue, Ky, 



Mate in 2 


No, 1553 

SIMON COSTIKYAN 
New York, N, Y; 



Mate in 2 


No, 1554 
F. W. WATSON 
Toronto, Canada 



Mate in 3 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE APRIL 25th, 1940 










46 


The Chess Review 


Original Section (cont’d) 


No. 1SE5 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N, Y, 





t 







Mate in 2 


No* 1.558 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N. Y, 



Mate in £ 


No. 1561 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N. Y* 

















& 








Mate in 3 


No, 1556 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N* Y. 



Mate in 2 


No* 1559 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N. Y. 



Mate in 3 


No, 1562 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N. Y. 



Mate in 6 


No. 1557 

AUREL TAUBER 
Now York, N* Y. 



Mate in 2 


No, 1560 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N. Y. 



Mate in 3 


No* 1563 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N. Y. 



Mate in 4 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE APRIL 25th, 1940 
















March, 1.940 


47 ' 


No. 1564 


“Football Field,” 1906 



Mate :eii 2 


No. 1565 

“Los Tours de Force,” 1906 



Mate in 2 


No. 1566 

Second Prize, “Good Com- 


panions” Block T y*, Apr., 1918 



Mate in 2 


Quoted Section 

Problems by Alain C. White 


No. 1567 

i 

First Prize, “Good Companions’ 
Meredith Ty., May, 1918 



Mate in 2 


No. 156S 

"Good Companions' Folder” 
Mar*, 1920 



Mate in 2 


No. 1569 

“Good Companions' Folder” 
May, 1920 



Mate in 2 


No. 1570 


“Tijdschrift v. d. 
N. S.-B./ T 1912 


mfm m m 


^ IPll ^ fj|||f 

JfJ _d 

HI 4 H HI 

fgi 

|| 



Mate in S 


No* 1571 

“ Bauern uni wand lung s- 
Schachaufgaben *■' 1907 



SELEm&te in 2 


NO* 1572 

“Les Mi fie et Un Mats 
Inverses,” 1907 



SELiEmate in 3 


THESE PROBLEMS ARE NOT SCORED ON THE SOLVERS' LADDER 




















48 


T he Chess Rev i e w 


43; V. Rosado 79; W. C* Dod 75; C, E, Winn- 
berg 47, 20; A* B* Hodges 57; **l. Ri vise 43; 
F« Grote 6, 22; T. L. Goddard 24; Bill Cltibb 
19; W, D. Gibbs 16; R* W* Hays 8, 

Congratulations Lo A. Sheftel who completes 
his second success fu I Ladder climb, and to our 
good friend Dr. Dobbs, whose fine Gri ms-haw 
study, No. 1494, was judged the best two-er 
of the quarter! 


No, nn 

No. 1-103 

No, H94 


No* 1195 


No. 1496 
No, 1497 


No. 1498 


No, H99 


No, .1 “>00 


No, 1501 


No, :i f>02 


No, 1503 


No, 1504 


SOLUTIONS 


by Geoffrey Mott-SmUh: 1 Qf2 {Two 
points) 

Very adequate presentation of comple- 
mentary pin i day, and in a gleam, no 
less — Rot ben berg, Nice alternate pins — 
Dobbs. Geoffrey’s gle&my gleams gleam 
— Pat.z. 

by the Problem Editor; 1 Kfl { Two 
points) 

Crosscheck play is a surprise; problem 
is aptly dedicated — lto then berg, 
by Da O. Dobbs: 1 Qh6 (Two points) 
First-class two-er — Keeney. Beautiful 
unpin combined with mutual interference 
— Patss. Grimshaw interference in pleas- 
ant setting — Uo the n berg. Unpinning of 
the Black: S adds a pretty twist to the 
Gr \ i n shaw — I u r \ e y . 
by F. Ganiage: 1 Qal (Two points) 

Good thematic triple cross-check— Dobbs, 
Pretty mates and a good theme, though 
the key is indicated by 1 ♦ ♦ * RxK.t — ■ 
Keeney. Precise crosscheck strategy 
with Mr. Carnage's infallible touch — Roth- 
ehberg, 

by I, and M, Hochberg: 1 Bel (Two 
points) 

by I, and M,, Hoot] berg: 1 Be 4 (Two 
points) 

The problems probably resemble one 
another as much as the I loch berg broth- 
ers — Keeney* Dovely Merediths nicely 
pr esc n t i ng re lated t ft e m es— Ro t lie n be rg , 
Neat Bishop and Rook inter for cnee— Patz. 
Show the nice distinction between the 
Grimshaw and Novotny — Dobbs, 
by Rudolf Popp: 1 Rd8 (Two points) 
Triple Lateral i lights well rendered ■ — ■ 
Dobbs. Old but new — Keeney, Neat 

echoes— Pa.tiz 

by Aurcl Tauber: 1 DhG (Two points) 
Good thematic key- — Dobbs. Splendid key 
and beautiful variations — Keeney, Cross- 
checks are a nice feature— Pali, Combi- 
nation of pin and crosscheck play — 
Rot hen berg. 


by F. W. Watson; 1 Qal (Two points) 
Excel lent mutate key— Dobbs. The use 
of ambush strategy in a mutate is not. 
common — Rot hen berg. Nice changed 

mate and good key — Keeney, 

by Percy Bow a ter: 1 Qh 4 (Three points) 
l 1 V . * FxQ; 2 SxMeh, 1 , , , KxS; 2 Qxg4 
eh, i , * * Ko5; 2 QxgSch (threat). 1 
. . , Sc7ch; 3 SxSch. 

Admirable models in the main play — 
Dobbs. Excellent key* Tory glad to see 
Bowater back — McKenna, The usual 
Bowater dose of devastating tries is 
pres e n t — Ro l h e n berg. 

by R. Cheney: I QhG (Three points) 

1 . . , Ke3; % SeGxeGch (threat), 1 , . . 
Re4xS; 2- Pc3eh, 1 . . . Rg5xS; 2 QfGeh. 
1 , . , Kc5; 2 Q filch, 

Complex pin play— Dobbs, Brilliant di- 
rect and indirect pin & — Keeney. Multiple 
pin conception, surpassed only by No, 
1594— Rot hen berg. Four artistic pins — 
Sheftel. 


by Dr. G, Dobbs; I SIS (Three points) 

I ■ ■ , KxS; 2 Qcfi. 1 . * , Kd5; 2 Se3ch. 

I I . ■ ■ Pd 2; 2 Qofich. 1 . , , Rafi; 2 Rc3eh. 
Ap p e al i n g- q u 5 e t seco n d m ov e— Ko o n ey , 
Good model mates, with nice* quiet move 
after ihc sacrifice is accepted — Rothcn- 

berg. 


by A. D, Gibbs: I Rb5 (Three points) 

1 . . * Ke5 ; 2 Sg2. i . * * threat; 2 QxR 
eh* 


This splendid symmetrical pin play con- 
struction coupled with a surprising cross- 
mate, gets my vote — Ro then berg. Beaut l- 
fnl pins — £5 he f lei. Quadruple pin mate 
after the tlighi.—Dobbs, 

No. 1505 by O, A, HoU: 1 Sg4 (Three points). “ 

3 , . , PxRr 2 Re2 

Simple single - li nor— Rot hen berg. Neat 

evasion of stale-mate — Fata, Cute sue- 
ces si v e s ae r i (S ees— Do b bs. 

No, 1500 by Aurel Tauber, should have been de- 
signated as "Male in 3,” as announced 
tn our January issue. 

Solution; .1 Baft; 2 Bh8; 3 Mate accord- 
ingly (Three points) A tasker in rather 
economic setting— Roth en berg, See Mr, 
Tauber's article elsewhere in this issue 
—Editor. 

No. 1507 by the- Problem Editor: 1 Bg6 (Two 

points) 

No. 1508 by F. W. Watson: Intended a line mutate 
solution by 1 Ql>6. but cooked by 1 Blvi, 
The author's correction arrived just loo 
late for publication — Editor, (Two points 
each for keys) 

No, 1503 by M Btikofzer and X, Horowitz : 1 Qf7 

(Three points) 

1. , . , Fbl(Q); 2 QdSoh; 3 Qc5* 1 , , . 
Pbl(R): 2 Qc?ch; 3 Qd8. 1 , , , Pbl(B) ; 

2 QhSch; 3 Qg5. l , , . Fbl(S); 2 Qa2ch; 

3 Qal- 

The gamut, of Fawn promotion is always 
pleasing in a sui — McKenna, Clever con- 
tinuity — Sheftel. Quadruple promotion 
ingeniously rendered — Dobbs. This is 
one of Horowitz's showpieces, sent to 
tts through the kindness of Mr, P, L* 
Uo then berg, Mr. Bukofzer supplied the 
basic setting, and Mr, Horowitz made 
it workable. Possibly it has been pub- 
lished before*, but if deserves to be re- 
d iag r a m m od — Ed i t o r. 

Nos* 1510-1518 Solutions withheld because of Ihc 
special Christmas tourney. 


Plstyan Tournament — 1912 


C* Schlechter 



F* D. Yates 


Black to make his 40th move 

Slack played 40 * * . Q-R4ch; 41 P-Kt4, Q- 
U8ch; 42 K-Kt3, Q-Kt8ch and finally drew by 
perpetual check. 

A brilliant win can be forced. 

40 , . , Q-R8ch ; 41 K-B2 (41 K~Kt4 P Q-R4 
mate)j Q KScFi; 42 K-B3 and now the “coup 
de repos*' K-R1HJ and white is lost. If 43 
QxP r Q-K7 mate, and if the Kt moves, then 
43 , * * R-K6ch ; 44 HNKt2, RxPch; 45 K-R2, 
Q-Kt8 mate. 



P . 


'ZY/SS/// 




Tub OFFICIAL ORGAN or thi- UNITED STATES OF AMERICA CHESS FEDERATION 

MARSHALL C. C. CHAMPIONSHIP 

CHESS IN HOLLAND 

DR. EUWE . FINE ♦ SIMONSON . HANAUER 


APRIL, 1940 MONTHLY 30 cents ANNUALLY S3.00 


REVIEW 

HONOR PRIZE PROBLEM 


A. D. GIBBS 
Rochester, N. Y. 


WHITE MATES IN THREE MOVES 


Official Organ of the 
United States of America 
Chess Federation 



CHESS 

REVIEW 


L A. Horowitz 
Fred Reineeld 
lidtlori 


Vol , V I M , N o* 3 PubI is bed M o n tbly Ap ri I , 1 94 0 

Published monthly by The Chess Review, 23 West 
4 3 i'd St., New York, N. Y. Telephone Wisconsin 
7-374 2. Domestic subscriptions: One Year $3 00; 
Two Years $3.30; Five Years $12.50; Six Months 
$ l .73. Single copy 30 as. Foreign subscriptions; 
$3. 50 per year except U. S. Possessions, Canada, Mex- 
ico, Central and South America. Single copy 35 as. 

Copyright 1939 by The Chess Review 

"Entered as second-class matter January 25, 1937, at 
the post olTice at New York, N. Y. f under the Act 
of March 3, 1879." 


CHESS CONSCIOUSNESS GROWING 

Many of our readers have seen the superb 
seven- page spread given to chess in the Janu- 
ary 29 issue of Life. Two pages were given 
to photos of beautiful chess pieces, four pages 
to a photographic reproduction ("in glorious 
technicolor/ 1 as it were) of Marshall's win 
against Tchigorin in one of the Monte Carlo 
Tournaments; and a final page dealt with the 
recent Intercollegiate chess matches ... a hot- 
headed reader called Life to task the next week 
because of a fancied error, but lie had to eat 
his words . . . The recent Maurice Evans 1 re- 
vival of Richard // featured a chess game in 
progress during one of the scenes; but the 

position (as seen through opera glasses) was , 

one never before seen on land or sea ... In 
The Ear! of Chicago , the inevitable antique - 
ivory chess set appears in the inevitable Jinglish 
castle . . . The most recent issue of Arts and 
Decoration featured a handsome and practical 
set of pieces on a chessboard for its front 1 
cover . . , chess cartoons are becoming more 
popular, and the stereotyped theme (one of 
the players growing a full-fledged beard while 
his opponent "thinks") is at last getting a 
we 1 1 - ea rn e d ret i rem en t , 

"There is a stability about chess," writes 
Howard Vincent O’Brein in Column Re- 
view, 'a quality of permanence that is cheering 
to people who must endure the disappearance 
of one anchorage after another. Boundaries 
may shift, nations may vanish, the rules of 
lesser games may be altered from year to year; 
but chess, immune to all the assaults of time, 
goes serenely on its unchanging way, played 
exactly as it was when Robespierre rushed from 
the Cafe de la Regcnce to join the march on 
the Bastille." 





T, > ^ 


MOPEY DICK AND THE DUKE 

This R3F)\c is ruining my fob, Mopcy—^I should of gtyne up anrl * ftUiC 


— W <?rL/ -J i. Ji-yrum 


As we go to press, we are able to give 
the names of the players who have quali- 
fied from the Preliminary sections of the 
U. S. Championship: 

Section A: G. Shainswit, A, S. Pinkus 
Section B: S. N, Bernstein, M. Green 
Section C: H, Seidman, F. Reinfeld 


49 




50 


The Chess Review 


■ JOHN F. BARRY PASSES ON | 

1 On April 9, Boston's most notable 1 
I chess player, John F. Barry, died at his 1 
1 home in West Roxbury, after several I 
I months’ illness, 1 

1 Mr. Barry was born in Dorchester, I 
I December 12, 1873- He served as Clerk 9 
I of the Municipal Court for 28 years and I 
I in the meantime studied law, being ad- 1 
I mitted to the bar in 1905. In 1917 he I 
I resigned to take up the practice of law, I 
I His record as one of America’ s out- 9 
I standing chess player s is best attested I 
1 by the long string of brilliant victories 1 
I he achieved in the series of Anglo- I 
I American cable matches in the '90s and 1 
I in the first decade of the present century, I 
I He regarded chess simply as a recrea- 9 
I tion, always declining to make it a pro- 9 
1 fessiom He did, however, play a match 9 
I with J, W, Showalter for the U, S, Cham- I 
I pionship, but the latter retained the title, I 
1 He also played and lost a match with B 
I Pillsbury, but won the distinction of 9 
9 being the only man in the world who 9 
K was ever four games up, at one time, 9 
I in a match with that distinguished op- 9 
fl ponent, 9 

9 Barry’s weekly chess column was a 9 
S feature of the Boston Transcript for a 9 
9 quarter of a century, having had its B 
I inception in 1915. 1 

blindfold exhibition at the 
HARVARD CLUB 

Symptomatic of the welcome revival of chess 
interest at the Harvard Club in New York, was 
the recent interesting blindfold exhibition given 
by Emerson W. Axe (Harvard '20) * Mr* Axe 
played six games, winning three and drawing 
ing three games. A good example of his 
trenchant style follows; 


QUEEN'S GAMBIT 


E. 

W. Axe 

(Blindfold) 

G. 

Cobb and 

B. Sage 


White 


Black 


1 

P-Q4 

P-Q4 

14 

B.Ktl 

P-KKt3 

2 

P-QB4 

PxP 

15 

Kt-K4 

KtxKt 

a 

Kt-KB3 

P-K3 

16 

QxKt 

BxB 

4 

P-K3 

Kt-KB3 

17 

KtxB 

P-K4 

5 

BxP 

B*K2 

18 

Q-R4 

P-KR4 

6 

Kt-B3 

P-B4 

19 

Kt-K4 

Q K2 

7 

0-0 

0-0 

2Q 

Kt-B6ch 

K-B1 

a 

P-QR3 

PxP 

21 

Q-Kt5 

K-Kt2 

9 

PxP 

Kt-B3 

22 

KtxPch 

Resigns 

10 

B-KKt5 

Q-B2 


If 22 . . , 

K-Ktl ; 

11 

Q-Q3 

P-QR3 

23 

Q.-R6 is devastate 

12 

QR-Q1 

R-K1 

ing. 


13 

B-R2 

Q-Q3 





TWO CLASSIC ATTACKS 

Here are two games from the recent Hamp- 
stead Invitation Tournament in England, which 
illustrate in varied ways the formation of a 
powerful attack against the hostile King. In 
both cases, Black handles the opening listlessly 
and soon finds himself under heavy pressure. 


SICILIAN DEFENSE 
P. S. MIlner-Barry |VL Blum 

White Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-QB4 

16 P-K5 

Kt-Q2 

2 

Kt-KB3 

P»K3 

17 P-KB4 

P-QKt3 

3 

P-Q4 

PxP 

18 P-R5 ! 

P-QKt4 

4 

KtxP 

Kt-KB3 

19 B-Q4 

R-Ktl 

5 

Kt-QB3 

P-Q3 

20 P-QKt4 

R-K1 

6 

B-K2 

P-QR3 

21 R-R3! 

P-B3 

7 

P-QR4 

Kt-B3 

22 R-R3 

R-Kt2 

8 

B-K3 

Q-B2 

23 B-Q3 

P-B4 

9 

Kt-Kt3 

Kt-QR4? 

24 K-R1 

K-R1 

10 

KtxKt 

QxKt 

25 P-Kt4 

P-Kt3 

11 

0-0 

B-K2 

26 R-KKtl 

R-KKtl 

12 Q-Q2 

0-0? 

27 Q-B3 

PxP 

13 

Kt-Q5J 

Q-Q1 

28 RxP 

Q-K1 

14 

KtxBch 

QxKt 

29 BxKKtP 

Resigns 

16 

P-KB3 

P-Q4 





SICILIAN 

DEFENSE 


Sir G, A. 

Thomas 

W. Rit®on 

Morry 


White 


Black 

1 

P-K4 

P-QB4 

12 

Kt-QR4 

Kt-R3 

2 

Kt-KB3 

P-Q3 

13 

Kt-B5 

BxKt 

3 

B-Kt5ch 

B.Q2 

14 

BxB 

Kt-B4 

4 

Q-K2 

Kt-QB3 

15 

QR-B1 

P-Kt4 

5 

0-0 

P-KKt3 

16 

BxKtS 

BxB 

6 

P-K5! 

P-Q4 

17 

Kt-Q4 

K-Q2? 

7 

P-Q4 

PxP 

18 

KtxKt 

PxKt 

8 

P-B4! 7 

PxP e.p. 

19 

P-K6ch ! 

PxP 

9 

KtxP 

P-K3 

20 

Q-K5 

Q-KKtl 

10 

B-Kt5 

B-K2 

21 

Q-Q6ch 

K-B1 

11 

B-K3 

pi . P-KR4 

22 

KR-K1 

R-R3 


M o rry 



Thom as 


23 

B-Kt6I I 

R-R2 

26 B-Q4 

P-R3 

24 

RxBchE 

PxR 

27 Q.KtBch 

R-Kt2 

25 

QxBPch 

K-Ktl 

28 B-K5ch 

Resigns 



April, 1940 


51 




The U. S. Championship 

Mr. L* Walter Stephens, Chairman of the 
Tournament Committee, supplements last 
month's article on the tournament with the 
following changes and additional details: 

1. Mr. Gustave Littman, the Southern Chess 
Association Champion, Mr. Weaver W. Adams, 
the New England ranking player and Mr. 
David Polland, former American Chess Fed- 
eration Champion, have been seeded and are 
permitted to play in the Final Championship 
Tournament without qualifying in the pre- 
liminaries. 

2. The prizes for the Tournament have been 
increased to a total of $1500*00 as a maximum 
as follows: 

First Prize $600.00 

Second Prize $400.00 

* Third Prize , . , * .$250*00 

Fourth Prize $150.00 

Fifth Prize ..... .$100,00 

3* The Committee has also decided to pay 
bonuses to non-prize* winning players of $8.00 
per point for each game won and $4.00 for 
each drawn game. 

4. All players in both the Men’s Tourna- 
ment and in the Women's Tournament both 
in the Preliminaries and Finals must be citizens 
of the United States. 

5. The pairings for the successive rounds 
will follow exactly the Berger system of pair- 
ings following the drawing* No inter-change 
of rounds will be made to suit the occasion. 

Those who have not sent contributions to 
r the tournament and would like to do so, can 
send in their remittances to L, Walter Stephens, 
at the Hotel Alamac, 71st Street and Broadway. 

An unfortunate error crept into last month's 
account of the tournament conditions. The 
sentence "We have made a time limit of 36 
moves per hour and IS moves each hour 
thereafter, instead of 40 moves per hour in 
the last tournament," should of course have 
read 'We have made a time limit of 36 moves 
the first two hours and 18 moves each hour 
thereafter, instead of 36 moves the first two 
hours as in the last tournament." 

The entry list for the Preliminaries was dis- 
appointingly small in number but gratifymgly 
high in playing strength* The players were 
divided into three sections as follows: 

Group A — G. Shainswit, A. S. Pinkus, M. 
Saltzberg, E. S. Jackson, Jr., D. Hallman, E. T. 
McCormick, B, Winkler and N. Bernstein. 


Group B — G. N* Treysman, S, Bernstein, M + 
Green, J. Soudakoff, B. Friend, W, Murdoch, 
K. Forster, P* B. Banister and T. Barron. 

Group C — F. Reinfeld, H, Seidman, O. 
Ulvestad, J. Feldman, W. Frere, J. S. Battell* 
J. Khotinlansky, J. Fulop and Miss A. Raettig. 

Jackson and Treysman subsequently dropped 
out, leaving the keenest "dog-fight" to Group C* 


Miniature Games 


Metropolitan Team Championship, Boston 1939 
DUTCH DEFENSE (in effect) 

W. W. Adams Chauvenet 


White 


Black 


1 P-K4 

P-Q3 

9 QxB 

B-K2 

2 P-Q4 

P-KB4 

10 R-K1 

P-Q4 

3 Kt-QB3 

PxP 

11 Kt-Kt5! 

Q»Q2 

4 KtxP 

P-B3 

12 B-Q2 

P*QB4 

5 B-Q3 

B-B4 

13 Kt-K6 

P-B5 

6 Kt-KB3 

Kt-B3 

14 Q-KKt3 

B-Q3 

7 KtxKtch 

KPxKt 

15 P*B4 

B*K2 

8 0-0 

BxB 

16 QxP 

Resigns 


(The winner of this game is a schoolboy; 
let' s hope his opponent here is not one of his 
teachers!) 

Cape Town 1940 
RUY LOPEZ 


Kollnick Schur 

White Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

7 PxP 

KKtxP?? 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

3 Q-Q5 

B-Kt2 

3 

B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

9 B-Kt3 

KtxKP 

4 

B-R4 

Kt-B3 

10 QxB 

Kt-B4 

5 

0-0 

P-Q3 

11 KtxKtl 

KtxQ 

6 

P-Q4 

P-QKt4 

12 BxPch 

Resigns 


New York 1925 



MUZIO 

GAMBIT 


F. Reinfeld 

Amateur 


White 


Black 


1 P-K4 

P-K4 

11 P-K5 

B-K3 

2 P-KB4 

PxP 

12 Kt-B3 QKt-Q2 

3 KLKB3 

P-KKt4 

13 P-Q5 

PxP 

4 B-B4 

P-Kt5 

14 PxBch 

KxP 

5 0-0 

PxKt 

15 Q-B5ch 

K-B2 

6 BxPch 

KxB 

16 QR.Q1 

Q-K2 

7 QxP 

B-R3 

17 RxKt 

QxR 

8 P-Q4 

P~Q3 

18 QxKtch 

K-Ktl 

9 BxP 

BxB 

19 Kt-Q5 

QxKt 

0 QxBch 

Kt-83 

20 Q-Kt5 mate 



CHESS IN THE LYNN HIGH SCHOOLS 

It is interesting to know that all six of the 
secondary schools in this New England City 
have flourishing chess clubs. In one of these 
schools, Gobbet Junior High, there are eighty 
chess players although the faculty advisers 
have been playing for only two years* Chess 
is steadily becoming a favorite extra-curricular 
activity in many schools in this country: but 
the intense enthusiasm for the game in Lynn 
is something decidedly out of the ordinary. 


52 


The Chess Review 


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

CHESS FEDERATION 

By W, M. P, Mitchell 

1940 marks an epoch in the history and 
development of American chess, since it wit- 
nesses the formal organization and birth of the 
United States of America Chess Federation, the 
first united body of chess 'followers, I think, 
which this country has achieved. Under the 
able and enthusiastic leadership of its first 
president, George Sturgis of Boston, we hope 
and expect to bring together eventually under 
one head all classes of chess players throughout 
the United States, and to perform on this 
continent the same function which has been 
accomplished by our British cousins through 
the medium of the British Chess Federation 
during the past thirty-five years. 

Our organization is now complete, but is 
still a mere shell within which we shall strive 
to gather the various units of our hitherto 
scattered American chess world. We desire to 
enlist these units in the form which shall 
appear most practical and most permanent; as 
State associations, as chess clubs, as individuals, 
or as all these combined. 

We urge all state-wide chess organizations 
to take immediate steps to affiliate with the 
new Federation on the basis of their total 
enrolled membership, insofar as this may be 
practicable- We urge the country's chess clubs, 
and in particular the larger and more influential 
metropolitan clubs, to affiliate with the Federa- 
tion in like manner, either directly or through 
their State associations where these exist. Last- 
ly, we urge all individual chess devotees, 
whether they are active players, passive "kibitz^ 
ers,” or mere stay-at-home enthusiasts, to join 
our Federation in their individual capacities, 
where they are not members of organized 
clubs or State bodies, or where for any reason 
they cannot affiliate as members of such clubs 
or bodies. 

Any such individual players or followers 
of the Royal Game are hereby invited to send 
their names and addresses to me at 17 Milton 
Road, Brookline, Massachusetts; or to Mr. Stur- 
gis at 111 Devonshire Street, Boston; or to Mr, 
Ernest Olfe at 1111 North 10th Street, Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. They will be duly en- 
rolled as members of the Federation, and will 
be billed accordingly for one dollar' s annual 
dues by our Secretary or Treasurer— a small 
enough contribution to the cause of national 
chess efficiency and unity! 

We realize furthermore that there exists a 
vast body of chess players in this country who, 


either from choice or through residential en- 
vironment, confine their chess activities to cor- 
respondence play. We appeal to such players 
to identify themselves likewise with our Feder- 
ation, either as individuals or through their 
various leagues and associations, such as the 
Correspondence Chess League of America, of 
which I am proud to be a Director and Life 
Member. 


FINE'S TOUR 

Reuben Fine has recently returned from an 
exceptionally successful tour, as may be seen 
from the following figures (won, lost and 
drawn games are indicated by the respective 
symbols +, — and — ; while B indicates 
blindfold games) : 


Jan. 

27, Philadelphia. . . 8B: + 5> =3 


+ =1 
— 20 , 

+ 1 


29, Richmond. ... .22 

31, St Louis 21 

IB 

Feb. 

2, Tulsa 15: + 14* =1 

IB; +1 

4, Dallas. ...... .27: + 27 

1 B ; — |— 1 

10, Mexico City. . , 6 (serious games) : -(-5, 

=1 

12, Mexico City. , - Consultation game vs. 

Araiza and Soto-Larrea =1 

13, Mexico City, . . 20: + 19, =1 

15, Mexico City. . . 23: +22, —1 

16, Mexico City. . . 8 (serious games) : +7, 

=1 


17, Mexico City, - , 51 

18, Cuernavaca. ... 19 

19, Monterrey 14 

2B 

22, Denver. 12 

2B 

24, Chicago. . .... ,31 

2B 

25, Detroit. ...... 25 

27, Minneapolis. , 37 

28, Winnipeg 29 

2B 

Mar. 

2, Montreal. .... .15: +15 

IB: +1 

4, Ottawa 21: +21 

IB: +1 


■ — 47, ^=4 
— 18, =1 
-414 
+ 2 
+ 12 

~\~ 2 

+ 26 , — 1 , =4 
+ 1 , =1 
25 


+ 34, 
+ 29 
+ 2 


- 1 . =2 


Total: 397 ordinary games, comprising 376 
wins, 18 draws and 3 losses. 21 blindfold 
games, comprising 17 wins, 4 draws and no 
Josses, 


Marshall Chess Club Championship 


MARSHALL CHESS CLUB 
CHAMPIONSHIP 

1939-40 

Qj 

C 

P 

1-1 

o 

3 

G 

X 

JZ 

>FH 

£ 

T3 

G 

cfl 

"3 

Pk 

c 

E 

72 

1 jO 

n 

<u 

P 

7S 

V 

g 

1 SH 

4J 

c 

s 

0 

Bernstein 

G 

(4 

O 

C 

C 

P 

t/l 

G 

- 

O 

u 

1— 1 

Vj 

4-1 

G 

CO 

Goldwater 

G 
. ^ 

(/i 

O 

OJG 

£ 

a 

0 

G 

w 

73 

■jj 

X 

*0 

3 

1 

X 

4J 

u 

8 

Uj 

1. — R. Fine 


i v 2 m\ i 

1 

1 

0 

1 

I | l 

1 

i)i 1 

1 

l 

14—2 

2.— M. Hanauer [0 

—Wi 

|0 

1 

I 

1 

1 

1 

Vi\ 1 

1 1 1 

1 | 

1 

1 

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13 — 3 

3- — F. Marshall y 2 

Vil— 

ll 

Vi 

1 1 0 

0 

1 1 1 Wi 

1 i 

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1 

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1 1 l 

12 — 4 

4. — D. Polland \y 2 \ 1 

0 

- 

V 2 

0 IV 21 1 1 V 2 VilVi 

1 

1 

1 

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1 

ll 

11 — 5 

5.- 6““H. Seidman 

0 

9 Vi 

Vi 

— 1 1 V 21 1 m 

0 

1 

Vi 1 

1 1 

1 

1 

10 Vi — Wi 

5.- 6. — Dr. E. Lasker 0 

0 

0 

1 1 0 

—\Vi\ I 


Vi 

1 

y>i 1 

1 

1 

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1 

ioy 2 — sy 2 

7. — E. Reinfeld . . 

0 

0 

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1 

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1 

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0 | 1 | 

| 10 — 6 

8 _™M. Green 1 

0 1 

aio)o mi—mmwiWii 

1 

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|9—7 

9.- 10. — S. Bernstein * j 0 

0 

o \V2\V2\ o mm\~m 

1 

0 1 1 

i 1 1 

1 

1 1 

8V 2 — 71/2 

9.- 10. — J. Donovan 

0 

Vi 

9 W2I 1 Wi\ 0 \V21V2 


0 ivii 1 

UV2 

1 

1 

8 1 / 2 — 7i/ 2 

1 1 . — J. Collins . . 

0 I 0 

Vtmo 

oMVk\o 

I 

— 1 0 |y 2 | 1 1 

1 

1 

1 

7V 2 — 8i/ 2 

12 . — A. Santasiere ....... 

0 

0 

0 ■ 0 mWii 0 m 

1 

Vt 

1 1 — ivii 1 m 

0 

1 1 

| 7 — 9 

13 .- 1 4 .— W, Goldwater 

0 

0 

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0 1 0 

0 | 0 | 0 

0 

0 

V2IV2I — ! 0 |i/ 2 

1 

1 1 

31/2—121/2 

13 .- 14 .—H. Ragosin 

0 

0 [ 0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 j 0 

1 | 0 | 

— 1 1 

Vi 

1 1 

iV 2 — 121/2 

15. — T. Knorr ................. 

0 0 

0 

0 

0 j 0 

0 

0 

0 

0 \V2\V2\ 0 m— 

1 

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3 —13 

16. — E. Heal .................... 

0 0 

0 

0 1 0 

0 

1 ) 0 

0 

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1 loj 

V21 0 

— 

0 I 

! 21/2—131/2 

17, — K. Howard , j 0 

0 

0 

0 Q 

0 

0 IV 2 I 0 

0 1 0 

0 

0 | 

0 ivii 1 

HI 2 — 14 


The splendid field assembled for this tour, 
nament would have done credit to many an 
international tourney. The superior style in 
which Fine achieved his victory, therefore de- 
serves all the more credit. Hanauer was the 
only player who proved to be a serious menace. 
Marshall made the most of a happy combina- 
tion of a youthful style and rich experience. 
Polland, Lasker, Seidman and Reinfeld ran 
a pretty even race most of the way, with honors 
going to Polland because of his greater steadi- 
ness. Bernstein and Sanfcasiere had the double 
misfortune of being in poor form and at the 
same time goading on their opponents to 
their best chess* Donovan, a very gifted young 
player, made an admirable score, and Collins 
likewise produced some excellent chess. Another 
interesting score is that of Heal! 

The dose competition resulted in a great 
many interesting games, as may be seen from 
the following selection. Many of the games, 
by the way, have important theoretical value. 


(The Crucial game!) 

CARO-KANN DEFENSE 

(Notes by Reuben Fine) 

R« Fine M. Hanauer 

White Black 


1 P-K4 P-QB3 

2 P-Q4 P-Q4 

3 K1-QB3 

Whether this or 3 PxP is chosen is ultimately 
a matter of taste. 


3 . * „ „ 

4 KtxP 

5 Kt-Kt3 

6 P-KR4 

7 Kt-B3 
3 B-Q3 


PxP 

B-B4 

B-Kt3 

P*KR3 

Ki>Q2 


There is a cute little trap after 3 B-QB4 : 3 
. . . KKt-R3 ; 9 Q-K2, P-K3; 10 Kt-K5, B-R2? 
11 KtxKBP! and the Black K will soon breathe 
his last. 10 . . . RtxKt should be played. 

8 , . . » BxB 

9 QxB KKt-B3 

10 B-Q2 P-K3 

11 0-0-0 GgB2 

12 K-Ktl . 

More usual is 12 KR-K1 (see e.g. Spielmann- 
Cap-ablanca, New York, 1927); the superiority 
of the text will soon become clear. 


12 ... . 0 - 0-0 

13 P-B4 B-Q3 

The development of this B appears very 
natural but is in reality premature because by 
deferring it Black reserves the option of play- 
ing the B to QB4 iu one move. Best is 13 , „ t 
P-B4 ; 14 BBS, PxP; 15 BxP, B-B4 etc., with 
about an even game. 


53 


54 


The Chess Review 


14 Kt-K4 KtxKt 

15 QxKt P-QB4 

If White's K were still at QB1, 15 , , , Kt- 
B3; 16 Q-K2, BBS would force the exchange 
ot' Bishops and destroy White's minimal ad- 
vantage. 

16 B-B3 Kt-B3 

17 Q-K2 P-H3 

Or 17 , , , FxP; 18 BxF p B-B4; 19 BxB, QxB ; 
20 Kt-K5, Q-B2; 21 P-B5! and Black’s position 
is still quite difficult, 

18 Kt-K5 BxKt 

This has obvious drawbacks, but a plausible 
alternative is hard to find. 


19 PxB 

Kt-Q2 

20 R-Q6 

Kt-Ktl 

21 KR-Q1 

Kt-B3 

22 P-R5 

KR-Ktl 

Intending . RxR, 

23 Q-K3 

Kt-QS? 


Getting panicky before the ship starts sink- 
ing, The first principle of the defense of 
cramped positions is to react only to specific 
threats* Consequently, despite its unappetiz- 
ing appearance, 2,3 * * . P~QKt3 should have 
been played, If then 24 Q/K4, K-Kt2 and if 
24 Q-R3 P RxR; 25 RxR, Kt-Ktl (not 25 * . * 
K-K42 ■ 26 RxKt!, QxR; 27 QxPch) and through 
the ice Black is skating on may be thin it is 
still far from cracked* 

24 RxRch RxR 

25 BxKt PxB 

There is no way in which the pin can be 
used. If 25 * . . Q.-Kt3 ; 26 BxP! RxiRch; 27 
K-B2, Q-Ql; 28 B4Kt6, Q-Q2; 29 Q-R5ch wins 
Black's Rook. Relatively best was 25 ... Q- 
Q2; 26 Q-KKL3, PxB; 27 $xP p P-Q6; 28 QxRP, 
Q-B3 but White should win in the long run, 

26 RxP RxR 

27 QxR Q-R4 


Hanatier 



Fine 


28 P-KKt41 .... 

The key move* White now has all his Ps 
defended (by the centralized Q) and will pro- 
ceed to get his K into the game, 28 F-R3 
would have been weaker, for after 28 . . . 
Q-KSch; 29 KR2, Q-K7; 30 P-Kt4, Q-R6 the 
win is much more than wliat. annotators like 


to call “a question of technique/’ E.g. after 
31 Q-B5ch, K-Ktl; 32 Q-KB&ch, K-R2; 33 Qx 
KtP, Q-Q6! Black should draw. 


28 ... . Q-K8ch 

28 . , * Q-Kt5 was better. 

29 K-B2 Q-K7ch 

30 K-Kt3 K.Ktl 

31 K-K14 


Threatening to march the K to Kt6 h which 
Black can hardly prevent* 


31 ... . 

32 K-R4 

33 K-R5 


Q-KBch 

Q-K7 

Q-B6 


If now 34 K-Kt6, Q-B3ch, 


34 Q-B51 


Decisive. 

34 

35 P-QKt4 


Q-K7 

Q-Q6 


The last chance : if 
37 Q-B7ch P QxQ mate! 

36 Q-Q6ch QxQ 

37 PxQ P^KKtS 

38 K-KtG K-B1 


36 K-Kt6 ? ? p 

39 P-B5 

40 PxP 

41 P-Q7ch 


Q-Qlch; 

PxP 

P-K4 

Resigns 


A "'SIMPLE” ENDING 


Fine 



Bernstein 


Despite all appearances to the contrary, it 
is by no means easy l'or White to draw. His 
Pawns on the K-side are disunited, while on 
the other wing Black is at least two tempi 
ahead (Le. in case of a deadlock on the K-side 
Black has two extra moves at his disposal). 

The first winning plan which comes to mind 
consists of maneuvering against the weak K- 
side Ps* Thus, e.g. 1 , * * K-B5 ; 2 K-B2, P- 
Kt5; 3 PxP, KxF; 4 K-Kt2 p P-KR4 ; 5 KXB2 P 
K-R6; 6 K-Ktl, P-R5; 7 K-Rl but now no 
further progress is possible. 

However, instead of £ * * . P-Kt5 P Black 
might try 2 * . . F-KR4 ; 3 K-K2, P-Kt5; 4 
PxP, PxP; 5 K-B2, K-Kt4; 6 K-Kt3, P-Kt3; 7 
K-B2, K-R5; 8 K-Kt2 P P-Kt4; 9 K-Ktl, K/R6; 
10 K-Rl, P-Kt6; 11 PxP, KxP; 12 K-Ktl, Thus 
this variation would also result in. a draw but 
it furnishes an important hint for a winning 
scheme: if White's Pawns on the Queen's side 
were weakened, he., if his QBP were at QB3 
the K could march over (after 12 K-Ktl) and 
gobble up a Pawn, Consequently Black's first 


A P R 1 1. , 194 0 


55 


effort is to Induce a Pawn advance' on the Q- 
skle. 

1 . . ■ . K-Q5 

2 K-Q2 P-QR4 

Since Black can only force White to push up 
his QBP at the point of a gun he is going to 
try the reverse of his first plan, i,e + weaken 
White's Q-side Ps, force the White K to stand 
guard over them, exchange and finally shift 
over to the other wing. Why the text was 
necessary will soon he seen* 

3 K-K2 P-Kt4 

4 K-Q2 P-B5 

If Black's P were still at QR3, White could 
draw here by 5 QPxP, PxP; 6 P-KL4, 

5 KtPxP 

This loses, but so does everything else. In 
view of the surprise which this end-game 
aroused when it was played it is interesting 
to examine the other variations: 

I 5 P-B3ch, K<H (better than 5 . . . K- 
B4 ; 6 P-Q4ch f K-Q4; 7 K-B2) ; 6 KtPxPch, 
PxP; 7 P-Q4 (7 PxPch, KxP; 8 K-B2, P-R5), 
K-K3; S K-K3, K-B4; 9 K-B2, K-B5; 10 K-K2. 
P-R4 ; 11 K-R2, P^Kto; 12 PxP, PxP; 13 K-K2, 
K-K14; 14 K-B2, K-R5; .15 K-Kt2, P-R5; 16 

K-R1 P K-R6; 17 K-K U, P-KtO; 18 PxP, KxP; 

19 K-Bl , K-BG; 20 K-Kl, K -K6; 21 K-Ql, K-Q6 ; 
22 K-I3.I, P-R6I; 23 PxP, KxP; 24 P-R4 (it 24 
K-Ktl, K-Q7 or 24 K-Ql, K-Kt7), K-Kl5 (24 
. . , KxP; 25 K-B2 would only draw) ; 25 K-R2, 
KxP; 20 K-B3, K-Kt4 and wins. 

II 5 P-B3ch, K-Q4 ; 6 Q PxPch, PxP; 7 K B2, 
P-B4! (7 . . . PxPch would only draw); 8 PxP 
eh, KxP: 9 P-Kt3ch (if 0 K-Q2, K-Kt6; 10 
K-BK P-B5 ; U K-Ktl, P-R5; 12 K-R1* P-R6; 
13 PxP, KxBP winning), K -Q 4 ; 9 K-Q3, P-B5 
ch!; 10 K-B2, K-B4; II K-KL2, PxP; 12 KxP, 
P-R5ch; 13 KxP, K-B5; 34 K-R5, KxP; 25 
K-K t6, K-Qti and Black gels there first. 

III 5 K-K 2, Pd ifi! (the simplest); 6 PxPch, 
KxP; 7 K-Q1 p P-R5 and again White will have 
to give up two Pawns lo stop the QRP. 

5 * * . . PxP 

6 PxP , . , , 

Again there is only a choice of evils, Jf 6 
P-B3ch, K-R4; 7 P-Q4ch (if 7 K-R2, PxPch; 

8 KxP, P^R5) , K-Kt4; 8 K-Bl, K-R5 ; 9 K-R2, 
P-R4 ; 10 P-R3, P-R5 and the Black King again 
penetrates to KtG where he must win a P 
eventually. 

6 . , . . KxP 

7 K-K3 P-R5 

S K-K4? 

He could have put up much more resistance 
with 8 P-B4!, when the win becomes exceed- 
ingly problem-like, if not problematic. The 
main variation t Ken is 8 * . . PxPch {not 8 
. * * P-B4; 9 P-Kl3ch! draws immediately); 

9 KxP, K-Q5 ! ; 10 K-B3! P-R4 : ! (10 . . . P-B4; 
11 K-K 2, P-05; 12 K-Q2, P-BOch; 13 K-Bl! and 
no winjs possible); 11 K-K2, K-K5; 12 K-B2 
(any Pawn move is fatal), K-B5; 13 K-K2, 
K-KU! (Black must lose a move); II RB2, 
K-Kt5; 15 K-K (2, K-B5: 16 K-B2, P-R5: 17 
K-K2, K-Kt5; 18 K-B2, K-RG ; 19 K-Ktl. i J -B4; 

20 K-Rl, P-B5; 21 P-B3 (else P-B6), K-Kl5; 
22 K-Kt2, P-R&c h ! ; 23 K-B2, K^B5; 24 K-K2, 
K-K5; 25 K-Q2, K-BfJ; 26 K-K1, K-K 6! {not 
26 * . . K-K 17 because Black wins the IIP but 
gels stuck in the corner); 27 K-Ql, K-Q6; 28 


K-Bl, PR6; 29 PxP, KxP; 30 P-R-i, K-Kt5 and 
Black will one by one tempo! 

8 . . . . p.B4 

Now it's simple. II White goes after the 
Black Ps all he gets is the traditional last 
meal of the condemned man, 9 K-B5, K-K 15 ; 
10 K-K 1 6, P-B5; 11 P-Ittch, K-Kt6 etc. 


9 

P-B4 

PxP 

10 

KxP 

K-QS 

11 

P-R4 

P-B5 

12 

P-B3ch 

K-Q6 

13 

K-B5 

K-B7 


14 Resigns 

(P, K. The variations given above are so enor- 
mously complicated that i am not at all sure 
that there is no flaw in the analysis!) 

—Reuben Fine 


(An mi conventional game, and one of great theo- 
retical value.) 

ENGLISH OPENING 

(Notes by M. Hammer) 

M. 


. Hanauer 

M, Green 

White 

Black 

1 P-QB4 

P-K4 

2 KTQB3 

Kt-K S3 

3 P-K Kt3 

P-Q4 

4 PxP 

KtxP 

5 B-Kt2 

Kt-Kt3 


The Kt cannot be maintained at Q4 by . + t 
B-K3, e.g, 6 Kt-B3, KLQB3; 7 O-O, B-K2; 8 
P-Q4 ! Black has now a choice of three lines, 
all unsatisfactory: 

I 8 , , , PxP;' 9 Ktxl\ QKtxKt: 10 BxKU 
(Hanauer-Ralint, U. S. Championship Prelimi- 
naries 1938), 

II 8 , . . PxP; 9 KlxP, K KtxKt; 10 PxKt, 
KtxKt; 11 PxKt, P-QB3; 12 R-KU, Q-Q2; 13 
Q-Rlp O-O; 14 P-Q5! (Hanauer-Horowita, Mar- 
shall C. C. - Manhattan C. 0. Match, 1937). 

1H 3 . . . KtxKt; 9 PxKt, P-K5 ; 10 Kt-K), 
P-B4 ; 11 IM33 ( PxP; 12 BxP, OO; 13 B-R4! 
(Hanauer-Kashdan, lb iv Championship, 1938). 


6 Kt-B3 

7 0-0 

8 P-Q3 

9 B-K3 


Kt-B3 

B-K2 

0-0 

P-B4 


Horowitz's idea: to keep back the B at QB1, 


continuing , . . B-B3, 
with an eventual , 


, , Q-K2 and . . . R-Ql 
, Kt-QG and . . , P-B4. 
(See his game -vs. Santasiere, The Chess Re- 
view, November, ] 939, P. 236,) 

10 P-QR4 

A special attempt to refute the above line. 
10 . . 


P-QR4 

PxB 

K-R1 


11 BxKt 

12 Q-Kt3ch 

13 P-K3! 

White's play has kept Black from control- 
ling Black's CJ4- The text prevents Black from 
controlling Black's Q5, Of course, if 13 . , , 
QxP? U QR-Q1 , Q-R3; 15 Kt-QKt5 etc. 

13 , P~BE> ! 

The correct counter, 

14 P-Q41 ? I ^ 

An adventurous P sacrifice, innocent in ap- 
pearance, and not entirely necessary, since 
Kt-Kl would do well enough. 


56 


The Chess Review 


14 . . . . BPxKP 

15 BPxKP PxP 

16 KtxP RxReh? 

An error: KtxKt at once was better, 

17 FExR KtxKt 

18 PxKt QxPch 

19 K-R1 * . * . 

Green 



Hanauer 

All this is logical and consequent— but now 
what? Black cannot develop his QB at Q2 
nor at Kt5: 

1 19 . . . B-Q2; 20 Q-B7 ! R-Kl; 21 QxB or 

20 . . . KB moves; 21 R-QL 

IJ 19 . . . B KKt5; 20 Q-B7I B-QR4 ; 21 P- 
KR3! Q-K6; 22 FxB, Q-E3ch; 23 Q-R5. 

19 , . , > Q-Q3 

20 R-Kl ! B-K15 

If 20 , . . B-Q2; 21 Q4B7, R-Kl; 22 Kt -Q5. 

21 Q-B7 ! Resigns 

For If 21 . . . B-KRl; 22 B-Q5. 


(Man beats Fine — - that's news!) 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 
(Notes by M. Green) 

M. Green R. Fine 

White Black 

1 P-Q4 Kt-KB3 

2 P-QB4 P-K3 

3 Kt-KB3 P-Q4 

4 Kt.B3 B-Kt5 

Fine has had great success with this vari- 
ation. My reply is an attempt to transpose 
into the Exchange Variation of the Q. G* D. 
(which I believe gives White a slight advan- 
tage). 

5 PxP KtxP 

„ . . QxP would transpose into the Nimzovieh 
Defense, as for example in Fine's game against 
Suesman in the U* S. Championship Tourna- 
ment of 1938. Fine claims that the text line 
has never been played before. 


6 B-Q2 

7 P-K4 

8 PxKt 

9 B-Q3 


0-0 

KtxKt 

B*K2 

P-QB4 


10 0-0 

11 Q-K2 

12 KR-Q1 

13 PxP 


P-QKt3 

B-Kt2 

Kt-B3 


13P-Q5 is met cleverly by 13 . * . PxP; 14 PxP, 
QxP; 15 B-Kt5, Kt-Q5 E 16 PxKt, BxB; 17 PxP, 
QxP and Black has a P plus without too much 
discomfort — enough for Fine! 


13 , « . . PxP 

In subsequent analysis Fine and I decided 
that 13 * - . BxP was quite playable. For if 

14 P-K5, B-K2 (the move Fine says he failed 
to consider; without it the K side attack is 
hard to counter, which explains the text); 

15 B-KR6, PxB; 16 BxPch, KxB; 17 RxQ 
Black gels too much for his Q, 

14 P-K5 Q-B2 

15 QR-Ktl QR-Q1 

16 B*KB4 Kt-R4 

17 B*K4 B-B3 

18 Q-B2 P-Kt3? 

The only move that can really be criticized. 
18 . * . P-KR3 was necessary > as will be seen 
later on in the game, 

19 RxR RxR 

20 R-Kl 

Not only following Nimzowich's Idea of over- 
protection, but having in mind the possible 
utilization of this R later on (see move 30). 

20 Q-Kt2 

At this point I realized that I had somewhat 
the better of it — but how to continue?? I had 
already consumed an hour and three-quarters 
to Fine’s hour (40 moves in two hours being 
the time limit), and I felt that after this last 
move he was going to put the pressure on, 
and turn the game in his favor — as he so 
often does in such positions! 

21 P-K R4! Kt-B5! 

22 BxB QxB 

23P-R5 Kt-Kt3?l 

This move didn't look right. Yet it threatens 
the exchange of Qs and a winning end-game. 

24 B-Kt5J BxB 

“Alas! If only 18 . , . P-KR3 had been 
played! " 

25 KtxB Q-R5 

26 Q-B1J Q-R5 

If 26 . . . QxP; 27 Q-B4, R-Bl; 28 Kt-K4 wins. 

27 KtK4 K-Kt2 

Forced. He can't permit Q-R6. 

28 Kt-B61 P-KR3 

29 R-K4, winning the Q, was threatened. 

29 PxP PxP 

30 R-K4 Q-Kt4 

31 Q-R3! R-Q8ch 

A last stab. It's all rapid transit from now 
on. 

32 K-R2 Q-B8 

33 QxBP 

Even stronger than QxPclu 


33 


K-B2 

34 K-Kt3, Q-K14ch; 35 


If 33 , * * R-RRch; 

R-Kt4 and that's all. 

34 Q*B7ch 

35 KtxKt 

36 K*Kt3 

37 R-Kt4 

38 R-B4ch 

39 QQ6 

40 Q-B8ch .... 

It's a check, and it's the 40th move! Black 
resigns. 

A victory over a grandmaster is not con- 
ducive to modesty— -I hope this explanation 
excuses the personal nature of the comments! 


Kt-Q2 

R.RSch 

Q-Kt4ch 

Q-K2 

K-Kt2 

Q-K1 



April, 1940 


57 


( A curiously abrupt finish with an ironic 
twist.) 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 


(An unconventional; tough battle.) 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 


Dr, E. Lasker 

White 


S, N, Bernstein 

Black 


F, J, Marshall 

S, N, Bernstein 

1 P-K4 

P-QB4 

21 P-Q6 

Q-Q1 

White 


Black 


2 Kt-KB3 

P-K3 

22 KtxPch 

QxKt 

1 P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

14 Kt-KS 

Kt-Kt5 

3 P-B3 

P-Q4 

23 QxKt 

QxQ 

2 Kt-K B3 

P-Q4 

15 B-B4 

KtxKt 

4 PxP 

QxP 

24 PxQ 

R*B4 

3 P-B4 

P-K3 

16 BxKt 

B-Q3 

5 P-Q4 

QKt B3 

25 P-Q7 

R-Q1 

4 Kt-B3 

QKt-Q2 

17 BxB 

QxB 

6 B-K2 

PxP 

26 B-R5 

RxKP 

5 B-Kt5 

B-K2 

18 Kt-R4 

R-K2 

7 PxP 

B*Kt5ch 

27 BxPcK 

K*Kt2 

6 P-K3 

0-0 

19 Kt-B5 

R-B2 

8 Kt-B3 

Kt-B3 

23 R-Q3 

R-Kt4 

7 Q-B2 

P-QR3 

20 KR-K1 

Q-B1 

9 0-0 

QQ3 

29 P-K Kt3 

R-Q4 

6 PxP 

PxP 

21 P-K4 

PxP 

10 P-QR3 

B-R4 

30 RxR 

BxR 

9 B-Q3 

R-K1 

22 KtxP 

B-B4 

11 Q-R4 

0-0 

31 B-K8 

P-QR4 

10 0-0 

Kt-BI 

23 Kt-Kt5 

Q-Q1 

12 B-KKt5 

P-QR3 

32 R-B7ch 

K-Ktt 

11 Q-Kt3 

P-B3 

24 Q-Kt3 

P-B3 

13 BxKt 

PxB 

33 K-B2 

B-B3 

12 QR-B1 

Kt-Kt3 

25 Q-Kt3ch 

Resigns 

14 QR-Q1 

P-Kt4 

34 R-K7 

P-K4 

13 KBxKt 

RPxB 



15 Q-Kt3 

B-B2 

35 B-B7ch 

K-B1 





16 Kt-K4 

Q-K2 

36 R-K8eh 

RxR 





17 Q-B3 

B*Kt2 

37 BxR 

Resigns 





18 P-Q5 

B-K4 

If 37 . . . 

K-K2; 38 

( Note the 

sudden transition from 

beetle- 

19 KtxB 

KtxKt 

P-Q8(Q). 


browed positional chess 

to direct attack .) 

20 P-B4 

QR-B1 




ENGLISH OPENING 


A, E. Santasiere F, Reinfeld 

White Black 


1 

P-QB4 

P-K4 

22 Kt-Kt3 

B-B2 

2 

Kt-QB3 

Kt-KB3 

23 Kt-B3 

Kt(1)-R2 

3 

P-KKt3 

Kt-B3 

24 Kt-R4 

P-KKt3 

4 

B-Kt2 

B-Kt5 

25 R-B2 

K-Kt2 

5 

Kt-B3 

0-0 

26 Kt-B3 

KtxKtch 

6 

Q-B2 

R-K1 

27 BxKt 

Kt-Kt4 

7 

0-0 

P-Q3 

28 K-Kt2 

R-R1 

8 

P-Q3 

B-Kt5 

29 R-R1 

RxR 

9 

B-K3 

B-QB4 

30 KtxR 

Q-R1 

10 

P-KR3 

B-R4 

31 Q-K2 

Q-R6ch 

11 

P-K Kt4 

BxB 

32 K-Ktl 

R*R1 

12 

BPxB 

B-Kt3 

33 B-Kt2 

Q-R7ch 

13 

P-K4 

KLQ5 

34 K-B1 

Kt-R6 

14 Q-Q2 

P-KR4 

35 Q-B3 

Q-Kt8ch 

15 

P-K3 

Kt-K3 

36 K-K2 

KtxR 

16 

Kt-R2 

PxP 

37 KtxKt 

R-R7 

17 

PxP 

Kt-Kt4 

38 B-B1 

B-K3 

18 

Q-K1 

Kt-Q2 

39 K-K1 

P-K Kt4 

19 

P-Kt4 

Kt-BI 

40 P-R4 

P-Kt3 

20 

Kt-K 2 

P-QB3 

Resigns 


21 

Q-Q2 

P-B3 



The championship of the Bronx Chess Club 
has been won by A, L, Friedman. Here is 
an interesting game from the tourney; 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 


S. Steinfeld A. L. Friedman 

White Black 


1 P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

12 Q-K4 

Kt-B4 

2 Kt-KB3 

P-Q4 

13 QxR 

KtxBch 

3 P-B4 

P-B3 

14 K-K2 

PxKt 

4 P-K3 

P-K3 

15 B-Kt5 

Q-B2I 

5 Kt-B3 

QK1-Q2 

16 KR-Q1 

Kt(5)xBP 

6 B-Q3 

PxP 

17 RxKt 

KtxR 

7 BxBP 

P-QKt4 

18 KxKt 

Q-B5ch 

8 B-Q3 

P-QR3 

19 K-B2 

PxPch 

9 Q-K2 

P-B4 

20 KxP 

B-R6ch I 

10 P-K4? 

PxP 

Resigns 


11 P-K5 

Kt-Kt5! 




BRONX COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 

The Empire City Chess Club, located at 464 
East 157th Street at Third Avenue, Bronx, 
N. Y. announces that it will hold a tournament 
to determine the Championship of Bronx 
County for 1940-1941, 

This contest will be preceded by an Elimina- 
tion Tournament for the purpose of reducing 
the number of contestants to no more than 
fifteen. This Tournament will be arranged in 
groups of eight or ten and will begin play as 
soon as the first group is formed, on or about. 
May IsL 

The leaders of each group will qualify for 
the Finals, 

Flay will be conducted on days suitable to 
the majority of the participants. 

Registration for the Elimination Tournament 
is now open and will close on or about July 
1st, There is a charge to non-members of fifty 
cents for the Elimination Tournament, For 
the Finals there will be a charge of $2,00. 

Former Bronx County Champions will not 
have to play in the Elimination Tournament, 
Those interested will please communicate 
with the Director of the Tournament, c/o the 
Empire City Chess Club and give their first/ 
second and third choice of days. 

The Club rooms are now open on Monday, 
Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday evenings 
but will be open daily for the accommodation 
of the tournament. Any chess player residing 
in Bronx County or a member of a Bronx chess 
club is eligible to compete. 

The prizes will be as follows: 

1. (a) A gold pin, 

Cb) Forty Dollars in cash. 

' tc) Free membership in the Empire City 
Chess Club for a year, 

2. (a) Twenty Dollars in cash. 

(b) Free membership for one year, 

3. fa) Ten Dollars in cash. 

(b) Free membership for one year. 

4. (a) Five Dollars in cash, 

(b) Free membership for one year. 

5. Free membership for one year. 


Manhattan Chess Club Championship 



CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENT 
MANHATTAN CHESS CLUB 
19 3 9 


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Rosenzweig . , . 

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A. S. Pinkus 


Dr. J. Platz . . 


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H. Avram 


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F, A. Pearl 


A. Simonson * 


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1 IVil 1 1 1 1 1 IVil Vil 0 1 1 s— | 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 II m~ 51 / 2 I 6 


J, Feldman 


A. S. Denker 


H. M. Phillips 


O. Tenner 


I 0 | 0 


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13 


^One game not played. 


(Inc /sire play by While!) 

FRENCH DEFENSE 
O, Tenner J, Feldman 

White Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K3 

15 KtxKt 

B-K4 

2 

P*Q4 

P*Q4 

16 0-QR4 

PxKt 

3 

Kt-QB3 

KLKB3 

17 B-QKt5 

R-K3 

4 

B-Q3 

P-B4 

18 QR-Q1 

B-Kt2 

5 

Kt-B3 

Kt-B3 

19 P-QB3 

R-KKt3 

6 

B-K3 

BPxP 

20 P-KB4 

P*Q5?1 

7 

KKtxP 

P-K4 

21 R*B2 

Q-R5 

S 

KtxKt 

PxKt 

22 PxB 

Q*R6 

9 

PxP 

KtxP 

23 B-Kt5! 

RxB 

10 

Q-B3 

B-QKt5 

24 B-B6 

BxB 

11 

0-0 

0-0 

25 QxB 

R-KB1 

12 

0-K4 

P-KB4 

26 ChK6ch 

K-R1 

13 

QxKP 

R*K1 

27 Q-K7 

Resigns 

14 

Q-Q4 

B-Q3 




(A strikingly original game which mirrors 
the interesting personality of the winner.) 

Manhattan G, C. Championship 1939*1940 
SICILIAN DEFENSE 


{Notes by A. 
Dr J, Platz 
White 

1 P-K4 P-QB4 

2 Kt-KB3 Kt-QB3 

3 P-Q4 PxP 


. Simonson) 

A, C, Simonson 
Black 

4 KtxP Kt-B3 

5 Kt-QB3 P-Q3 

6 B-K2 P-K4?I 


Although this move is unpardon ably bad 
as chess, l think that anything is forgivable 
to get away from the dull, routine ^book 1 ' 
moves. 


7 Kt-Kt3 B-K3 

8 B-B3 

A very poor way of preventing , . „ P-Q4, It 
takes an active B out of play. Much better 
was the developing move B-KK15, 


8* ■ ■ , , 

P-QR4 

Watch this baby grow . , , 


9 B-K3 

P-R5 

. , , .and Grow . . . 


10 Kt- BI 

P-R6 

, , . and GROW! 


11 P*QKt3 

Kt-QKt5 

12 0-0 

P-Q4 

13 PxP 

B-KB4 


The QP could have been captured by Black, 
but he preferred additional complications, 

14 KbQ3 P- K 5 ? J 

15 R-K1 

Better was 15 KtxKt, BxKt; 16 Q-Q4, Q-K2 
(Iti . . . BxKt? 17 QxB> PxB; 18 Q-K5eh, Q-K2; 
19 QxB with an easily won game); 17 B-K15, 
BxKt; 18 QxB, O-O; 19 KR-K1, QR-B1 ; 20 
Q-Q4, Q-Q3 ; 21 BxKt, QxB; 22 QxQ, PxQ; 23 
BxP, BxB; 24 RxB, RxP; 25 R-Kt4ch, K-Rl ; 
26 R-Q4, R-Kl; 27 P-Kt3> R(l)-K7; 2S P-Q6, 
R(K7)-Q7 ; 29 R-Ql, RxRch; 30 RxR, R-QB1 ; 
31 K-Kt2 and wins. 

15 . . , . QKtxQP 

16 KtxKt QxKt 

17 Kt-B4 QxQ 

18 BxQ B-QKt5 

White is quite weak on dark squares, thanks 
to the Trojan work done by Black's QRP, 


April, 1940 


59 


19 R-KB1 

B-B6 23 

RxB 

Kt-Q4 

20 R-Ktl 

0-0-0 24 

Kt-Q4 

B-Kt3 

21 B-B1 

B-Q7 25 

Kt-Kt5 

P-B4 

22 Kt-K2 

BxB 26 

KtxP 

■ **■■■ 

Just a loan > - * which will be repaid. 

26 

■ f r i 

Kt-B6 


27 

R-R1 

P*Kt4! 


This move immobilizes White's forces quite 

effectively. 

28 

R-K1 

K-Kt2 


29 

B-K2 

K*Kt3 


30 

K-B1 

R-R 1 


31 

Kt-Ktl 

KtxP 

- 

32 

BxP 

-I fr Hi -B 


Hoping 

for 32 , , . KxR; 

33 RxKt 

with a 

won game. 

32 

■ ■ + * 

Kt-Kt5 


33 

RxR 

Simonson 

RxR 




Dr. Platr 


34 B-R4 .... 

It U P-QH1, Kt-Q<i ; 35 R-Ql, R-RT : 36 R-Q2 
(if 35 ICL-Q2? B-Rl ; 37 P-B3, P-K6 and wins), 
R-R8; 37 R-Ql, B-R4; 38 P-133, PxP; 3!J PxP, 
BxP ; 40 iRxKL, llxKlcli ; 4.1 K-B2, JB-K5 and 
Black should win with his superior position. 

34 ... . KtxP 

35 R-Q1 R-QB1 

36 Kt-Q2 K-R4! 


I consider this quiet niove the best of the 
same. It prevents Kt-B4ch (. . . RxKt) which 
would allow White to rapidly consolidate his 


forces and obtain an even 

game. 


37 B-Q7 

R-B4 

42 R-Q7 

KxP 

38 P-Kt4 

P-B5 

43 Kt-Kt6 

RxP 

39 B-B5 

BxB 

44 RxP 

R-K4 

40 PxB 

P-K6 

45 PxP 

PxP 

41 Kt-B4ch 

K-Kt5 

46 R-Kt2 

Kt-Q5 


47 R-Kt2ch K-B6 


47 . . . KxR would also win, but not as 
quickly: IS Kt-B4ch, K-B8; -19 KtxlR, K-QS; 
50 Kt-Q3, K-Q7; 51 Kt-Kl, P-R4; 52 P-R4 
(if 52 P-R3, P-R5; 53 Kt-Kt2, l<t-B6 wins), 
P-K7ch; 53 K-B2, Kt-B-i; 54 Kl-B3ch, K-QS; 
55 Kt-Kl, KtxP etc. 

48 Kt-R4ch K-Q6 

49 R-Ktl P-K7ch 

50 K-B2 R-B4ch 

51 K-Kt2 K-Q7 

52 Kt-Kt6 P-K8(Q) 


53 Kt-B4ch K-K7 

Resigns 


(Black allows a break-through with fatal 
results.) 


INDIAN 
B. Blumtn 


White 


1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K3 

3 

Kt-QB3 

B-Kt5 

4 

Q-B2 

Kt-B3 

5 

P-K3 

0-0 

6 

P-QR3 

BxKtch 

7 

QxB 

P-Q3 

8 

Kt B3 

Q-K2 

9 

B-K2 

P-QR4 

10 

P“QKt3 

Kt-K5 

11 

Q-B2 

P-B4 

12 

0-0 

B-Q2 

13 

B-Kt2 

QR-K1 

14 

QR-Q1 

B-B1 

15 

Kt*K1 

P-Q4 

16 

Kt-Q3 

R-B3 

17 

P-B3 

Kt-Kt4 


DEFENSE 

J. Soudakoff 


Black 


18 

Q-Q2 

R-R3 

19 

Q-K1 

R-B1 

20 

Kt-B4 

Q-Q3 

21 

Q-Kt3 

Kt-82 

22 

P-K4 

Kt-K2 

23 

P-B5 

Q-Q1 

24 

B-B3 

BPxP 

25 

PxP 

PxP? 

26 

P-Q5 

Kt-B4 

27 

PxPi 

KtxQ 

28 

PxKtch 

K-R1 

29 

RxGl 

RxR 

30 

Kt-Kt6ch 

PxKt 

31 

P-B8(Q)eh 

RxQ 

32 

RxRch 

K-R2 

33 

PxKt 

Resigns 


( Black loses too much time.) 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 
G. Shainswit o. Tenner 


White Black 


1 

P-Q4 

P-Q4 

17 Q-R6 

Q-R6 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K3 

18 P-B5 

Q-B1 

3 

Kt>QB3 

Kt-KB3 

19 PxP 

RPxP 

4 

B-Kt5 

QKt-Q2 

20 BxP 

QxQ 

5 

PxP 

PxP 

21 BxPch 

K-R2 

6 

P-K3 

B-Kt5 

22 BxQ 

R-R1 

7 

B-Q3 

P-B4 

23 B-B4 

Kt-Kt3 

S 

Kt-B3 

Q«R4 

24 B-K5 

R-B1 

9 

0-0 

P-B5 

25 R-B4 

RxB 

10 

B-B2 

BxKt 

26 RxRch 

K-Kt3 

11 

PxB 

QxBP 

27 QR-B1 

Kt~Q2 

12 

R-B1 

Q-R4 

28 R-Kt7ch 

K-R3 

13 

Kt-KS 

0-0 

29 R-Kt8 

P-K t4 

14 

P-B4 

R-K1 

30 R-B4 

K-R4 

15 

KtxKt 

KtxKt 

31 R-B7 

K-R3 

16 

Q-R5 

P-KKt3 

32 B-B4ch 

Resigns 


BOSTON NOTES 

The Boston City Club finished in first place 
in the Metropolitan League team match tour- 
nament with the excellent score of 17^ points 
out of a possible 18. A total of ten teams 
participated. Among its other activities the 
City Club is now playing a correspondence 
match by air mail, with the Havana Chess 
Club, with six on each side. Frank J. Mar- 
shall, former United States champion, is sched- 
uled to visit Attleboro where he will give a 
simultaneous exhibition against players from 
the Southeastern Massachusetts League on 
April 9th. Harlow B. Daly is leading in the 
Massachusetts Stale Tourney (7 wins and no 
losses) in a field of 16. The finals in the 
Interscholastic tournament will be played 
shortly at the City Club with Pittsfield, Spring- 
field, Worcester, New Bedford, Boston and 
Lynn represented in the first round. 


60 


The Chess Review 


Chess Masters, Beware! 

By Georges Koltanowski 

Upon my return from Mexico City last 
June to Guatemala, I found a letter waiting 
for me from Mr, Ernest Olfe, Secretary of the 
American Chess Federation, in which he asked 
if I would not agree to come to Milwaukee to 
spend the summer holidays there and see how 
great the interest was for chess by the children 
on the playgrounds* Having heard on my last 
tour through the United States of the Mil- 
waukee plan for promotion of chess, I thought 
it a good idea to get in closer touch and see 
what they were really doing, I therefore jumped 
at the occasion to be able to come to Milwaukee. 

Now that I am at dose range with the work- 
ing of the chess department and the children 
in action on the playgrounds, I am simply 
flabbergasted. Never could I have imagined 
that chess could be organized to such a great 
extent and on such a solid basis as here in 
Milwaukee* 

During the course of my travels, I have 
come across many schools where chess has 
been taught, but then it is understandable that 
children will take to chess when it is taught 
as a part of their regular school curriculum* 
But to think that during the period of summer 
holidays, children between the ages of seven 
to fourteen and even older will clamor for 
chess boards and sets On the playgrounds during 
the greatest imaginable heat at all hours of the 
day is unbelievable. Usually it is considered 
in other countries that everything lodged in the 
United States is just mere bluff. 1 will admit 
that before seeing this well organized method 
of teaching chess, I was not quite convinced of 
its value. But after the Tournament held last 
Wednesday in which seven hundred thirty boys 
and girls took part, and after meeting the 
thousands of children I have taught chess on 
the playgrounds, I can only take my hat off 
to the pioneers of this great promotion for 
the fine game of chess* 

Seven hundred thirty boys and girls parti- 
cipated at one time* Some schools walked as 
far as four and one-half miles to get to the 
playground where the Tournament was held, 
which, by the way, was organized by the 
Milwaukee Journal in conjunction with the 
Milwaukee Public Schools, Department of Mu- 
nicipal Recreation, under the supervision of 
Miss Dorothy C Enderis and direction of Mr, 
D. B. Dyer, the real brain trust of chess in 
schools in Milwaukee, Seven hundred thirty 


players, some of whom did play King takes 
King or castling with the Queen. But, I doubt 
if any masters' tournament game was fought 
* with a greater fighting spirit than these young- 
sters fought their games. Even 1 was surprised 
at the way some of them would fight their 
games to such a bitter end, and a draw only 
came when each had only one King left* 
Could anything be fairer than that? 

There they sat on the grass, with the board 
between them, the sun blazing down so that 
I, just coming from Central America, received 
a brown tan. But that did not worry them* 
At each end of a round (they played, by the 
way, the single elimination system) most of the 
children ran to have a cool drink of water 
and came back in time for the next round. 
Even the players had their bunch of supporters 
like in any other sport. At one moment the 
supporting spirit knew no bounds* When I 
ruled one player out, his supporters hooted me 
all over the place* But they became quite good 
friends with me, all shaking hands, when they 
heard that I would come and teach them how 
to play chess. 

The organization of this tournament was one 
of the best I have ever seen, Everything ran 
very smoothly. The Milwaukee Journal was 
so impressed by the great amount of entries 
and the keenness of the competition, that it 
has definitely taken upon itself to arrange this 
event annually, thus proving that chess is not 
an old man's game. 

It is not for me to return the game to the 
question of the value chess has in our lives, 
but it is certainly pleasing to find that in Mil- 
waukee every year five thousand or more new 
chess players are developed on the playgrounds. 
Within five years I am certain that Milwaukee 
will not only have the greatest amount of 
chess players in the United States, which I 
think it has already, but will also turn out the 
best players in great majority, They say that 
the threat is more dangerous than the fulfill- 
ment; therefore, I can only say to the other 
towns, '"Wake up before it is too late. The 
Milwaukee system is the best." 


According to Sidney Skolskys column, 
George Brent is an expert chess player* It 
would be interesting to see a match between 
him and Ray Mi Hand, who is generally con- 
sidered one of Hollywood's best chess players* 


April, I 9 4 0 


6 1 


Chess in Holland 

j 

Despite (or because of?) the ever-growing 
war tension, chess continues to become more 
and more popular in Holland and there is 
a steady round of interesting master chess in 
continual progress. An instance of Dutch 
enthusiasm for chess is seen in the fact that 
quite a few of the leading papers published 
long accounts of all. the games of the Kcres- 
Euwe Match, each game appearing with very 
detailed notes the day after it was played, 
sometimes taking more than two full columns 
— and this despite the inordinate demands 
made upon today's newspapers by war news! 



CHESS IN MILWAUKEE 


Delft 1940 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 


Dr. M. Euwe 


White 


1 

P-K4 

P-QB4 

2 

KLKB3 

P-Q3 

3 

P-Q4 

PxP 

4 

KtxP 

Kt-KB3 

5 

KLQB3 

P K Kt3 

6 

B-K2 

B-Kt2 

7 

0-0 

0-0 

3 

B-K3 

Kt-B3 

9 

P-B4 

B-Q2 


S, Landau 


Black 


10 

K-R1 

R-B1 

1 1 

Kt-Kt3 

P-QR3 

12 

B-B3 

Q-B2 

13 

Kt-Q5 

KtxKt 

14 

PxKt 

Kt-R4 

1b 

KtxKt 

QxKt 

16 

P-B3 

R-B5 

17 

Q Q2 

P-Q Kt4 

18 

KR-K1 

KR-B1 


Landau 



Dr. Euwe 


Landau has overlooked the following move, 
which wins some material. 


19 Q-K B2 [ 

Q-Q1 

22 B-B2 

RxB 

20 B-K2 

R-R 5 

23 RxR 

P-Ktb 

21 B-Q1 

R-K5 

24 P-B5I 

QKtPxP 

Leads to an 

exciting 

finish. 


25 BPxP 

QBPxP 

30 B-Ktl 

Rx Rch 

26 PxBPch ! 

K-B1 

31 RxR 

Q-R4 

27 QR-K1 

B K B3 

32 R-KB1 ! 

Q-B6 

28 BxP 

R-B8 

33 Q-Kt6 

Resigns 

29 Q-Kt3 

B-Kt2 




( Wh o J s attac k ing?! ) 

Dutch Club Match 1940 



A, J. de Ruyter 

A, Snoep 


White 


Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K3 

19 Q-K3 

P-R3 ! 

2 

P-Q4 

P-Q4 

20 KtxPch 

QxKt 

3 

Kt-QB3 

KLKB3 

21 QxQ 

BxQ 

4 

B-Kt5 

B-K2 

22 Kt.B7 

BxKR 

5 

P-K5 

KKt-Q2 

23 KtxR 

BxR 

6 

P-K R4 

P-KR3 

24 PxB 

K-K2 

7 

B-K3 

P-QB4 

25 Kt-Kt6 

K-K3 

3 

Q-Kt4 

K-B1 

26 Kt-R4 

B-Q5 

9 

R-R3 ? 

PxP 

27 K-Q3 

B-R2 

10 

BxQP 

Kt-QB3 

28 B-K12 

P-QKt4 

11 

Kt-B3 

KtxB 

29 Kt-B3 

R-Q1 

12 

QxKt 

Q-Kt3 

30 Kt-K2 

K-K4 

13 

Kt-QKtS? 

B-B4 

31 Kt-BI 

P-Kt3 

14 

Q-KB4 

BxPch 

32 KLK13 

B-Kt3 

15 

K-Q2 

B-B4 

33 Kt-Q2 

K-B5 

16 

P-QKt4 

B-K2 

34 Kt-Ktl 

K-Kt6 

17 

KKt-Q4 

KtxP! 

35 B-B1 

#■ m m m 

18 

QxKt 

B-B3 

Resigns 



(Fabulous 

lime pressure lakes its 

toll!) 


Played in a Club Match 1940 




QUEEN'S 

GAMBIT 



(Notes by Dr 

M. Euwe) 



Dr, M, Euwe 

S* Landau 


White 


Black 


1 

P-Q4 

P-Q4 

15 BxB 

QxB 

2 

P-QB4 

PxP 

16 P-K 5 

KR-Q1 

3 

KLKB3 

Kt-KB3 

17 KR-Q1 

■ ■ 1 ■ 

4 

P-K3 

P-K3 

B-K4! was much 

5 

BxP 

P-B4 

s t r o n ge r f e s t a-bl I s h i ng 

6 

0-0 

P-QR3 

terrific pressure. 

7 

Q-K 2 

P-Q Kt4 

17 . . . . 

Kt-BI 

8 

B-Q3 

B-Kt2? 

18 KR-QB1 

Kt-Kt3 

9 

PxP 

Kt-B3 

19 Kt-B5 

KLQ5 

10 

P-QR4 

P-Kt5 

20 KtxKt 

RxKt 

11 

QKt-Q2 

BxP 

21 Q-K3 QR-Q1 ?! 

12 

KLKt3 

B-K2 

22 BxP 

B-R1 

13 

P-K4 

0-0 

23 Kt-Kt3 ? 

■ ■ ■ ■- 

14 

B-KK15 

Kt-Q2 



Simply B-B1 was in order. 



23 , . , . R-K5 

24 Q-B5? . . , . 


Better was Q-Ktt;, Intending QxRch followed 
by 




62 


The Chess Re v i e w 


24 ... . Q-Kt4 

Threatening . R-KSch. 

25 B-B1 KtxP 

26 R-Q1 R-KB1 ? 

Overlooking the prettty finish 26 * , , Kt- 
BGch; 27 K-Rl, R-R5! -28 RxRch, Qx(R; 29 
P“R3 (or 29 FxKL Q-K-tl), RxPchl 30 PxR, 
Q-Ktl etc, 

27 K-R1 R-R5 

Threatening to win outright with , > „ Kt-B6, 

28 R-Q4 R-RG 

29 Kt-Q2 * . . . 


Landau 



Dr. Euwe 


29 


Kt-B6?! 


The more prosaic . . . Q-R4 wins almost at 
once. 


30 QxRch KxR 

31 KtxKt RxKt 

32 QR-Q1 . . . . 

Or 32 P-R4, R-R6ch etc. 

32 . , * . K-K2 

33 R-Q8 B-K5 

34 K-Ktl R-KR6 

+ . , R’QKtS was quicker. 

35 R (1 )-Q7ch K-B3 

36 R-KB8 B-Kt3 

37 P-R5 1 R-QKt6 

38 P-R6 RxP 

If now 39 F-R7, Q QB4 wins. 

39 R (8)-Q8 Q-B5 

40 P-B3 Q-K6ch 

41 K-R1 B-R4 


Or 41 . iR-Kt.8; 43 R-Ql, RxR; ' 43 RxR, 

P-Kt6 etc. 

42 R-Q1 BxP 45 RxQ R-KtSch 

43 R (8)-Q3 BxPch 46 B-B1 RxBch 

44 BxB QxR 47 K“Kt2 R-QRS 

(White resigns. The numerous time pres- 
sure blunders which mar' this interesting game 
are of course -by no means representative of 
the skill of these two fine players, — F,R>) 

( de 5 chddk w er eld ) 


VENTNOR CITY INVITATION 
TOURNAMENT 

In the summer of 1939* the first Vent nor 
City Invitation Tournament was held in the 
Sun Room of the Municipal Pier at Ven.tn.or 
City, N. J. Admittedly an experiment, it turned 
out to be an event as enjoyable as it was dis- 
tinguished, Twelve players were invited, and 
a splendidly balanced tournament resulted, 
Although none of the grandmasters were in- 
cluded, the play was of a high level and was 
characterized by its fighting quality, A young 
newcomer, Okf I. U1 vest ad from Seattle, con- 
tributed to the color and "fightingness” of the 
play. 

The Committee in charge of this event has 
announced the date for this year's tournament, 
which will take place July 6th— 14th, inclusive. 

It is the policy of this Committee to extend 
invitations to masters of recognized ability and 
also to up-and-coming young players. The 
Committee has found that the sportsmanlike 
and gentlemanly manner of the players adds 
a. great deal to the interesting character and 
genial atmosphere of the tournament. 

Those who contributed towards, the funds of 
this tournament last year, should have a warm 
feeling of having materially assisted at the 
inception of what should t soon come to be 
recognized as one of the premier events of 
American chess. Due to the fortunate condi- 
tions under which this tourney is conducted, 
actual tournament expenses are almost negli- 
gible, with the result that the players receive 
practically all the monies subscribed, thus bring- 
ing the prizes to a very satisfactory level. In 
addition, the ideal surroundings and climatic 
conditions all tend to make the week spent 
in Ventnor a memorable one, so that players 
who receive invitations consider themselves 
honored and fortunate. 

Patrons and lovers of the game who desire 
to contribute to the funds of this, event, this 
year, may send their checks to the General 
Secretary, Mr, Gerald H. Phillips, 11.6 M. 
New Haven Avenue, Ventnor City, N. J. The 
entry list is fully made up now, and is to be 
announced very shortly, 

CALIFORNIA NOTES 

The championship ol: the Northern California: 
Chess League has been won by the Russian 
Chess Club. Here are the details: , 


Russian Chess Club »_ 1 _ 4%— - y 2 

Mechanics Institute 4 — 1 

Castle Chess Club 

San Fran ciseo i y z ^-%y 2 

University of California _ 1% — %y 2 

Alameda 0 — 5 


In the Mechanics Institute Champ ion-ship the 
title was annexed by Harold W. Simon, with 
V, Pafnutieff, second, and V. Lapiken, third. 


April, 1940 


63 


Chemev’s Chess Corner 

TODAY'S MENU: 

A CONDITIONAL 
A REMARKABLE SELF-MATE 
TWO DAINTY MINIATURES 


T. M, Brown 



White mates in 8 without capturing any 
Black Pawns. 


d*d 

9a-i» 

40}>ixa 

8 

Z 

Kn>i 

Moyxu 

9 

S*d 

qosM-a 

S 

yxy 

MOax(tu)d 

t? 

3>ca 

Mo^y-u 

s 

dXd 

MOgxa 

z 

4>1Xd 

M09g-(SM)i» 

l 


K, Flatt 



Self-mate in 10 



9H*D 

Ot 

Zd’>l 

M^OWS 

6 

81>TM 

Z8‘d 

8 

za-M 

m+d 

Z 

81M'>I 

ZO I’M 

9 

ZdCH 

8WH 

9 


9d“9 

t 


ZM'd 

3 


MO^b-D 

3: 

8B-M 

sa-g 



Cheron 



Mate in 3 


3 *elu gxg 5 
1>|XS IWDH Z 

d* a i 


Dobrusky 



Mate in 3 

a;eoi 9^X h >| % 


1?>r>i ZW>i Z 

d*>1 8^*9 l 


COMM ERCIAL CHESS LEAGUE 
OF NEW YORK 


This organization completed one of its most 
successful seasons last March with the follow- 
ing results: 


Team 


Matches Games 


W. L* 

I.-2. Consol. Edison Jt y 2 ~l % 

1.-2. N. Y. Times 

3. Chase National ^7 -2 

4. Bell Tel. Lab..— 

5. Real Estate Bd 2 

6. New York Tel. Co 4 -5 

7. N. Y. Times “ft” ..3 -6 

8. Brooklyn Edison 2 -7 

8. Am. Tel. & Tel 1 V^lVz 

10. Journal -American .--..0 -9 


W, L, 
20 -10 
25«-10% 
a6!4-10Vi 

24 -12 
22 44 

18*446i4 
16 -20 
11 -25 
8%-27% 
2 -33 






64 


The Chess Review 



White to play and win 


Robert Willman has sent us the above re- 
cent composition. It has some very pretty 
points and each piece is used to the best 
advantage; and in addition, the reader can 
derive some interesting pointers which will 
be of value for over-th e-board play, 

It is important to remember that the player 
with the Bishop must keep his Pawns on the 
opposite-colored squares. Thus if White were 
to play 1 P-K7? he would be completely sty- 
mied after , , . K-Q2. 

The solution : 

1 B-K5 R-Ktl 

White threatened to win at once with P-Q7ch 
followed by B-B6eh. 

2 P-Q7ch K-Q1 

3 B-B6ch K-B2 

4 K-Q5 R-QR1 

Forced: White threatened B-K5cb followed 
by K-Q6, 

5 BxP P-Kt5 

6 B-Kt3ch ! . , * * 

White wants to bring bis K to K5 without 

allowing Black to reply , , , P-K16. 

6 . . , . K-Q1 

7 K-Qb R-R3ch 

8 K-K5 R-R1 

Best. If 8 . * . R-R4 eh ; 9 Km, P-K16; 10 
B-R4, R-Rl; 11 KB7ch N K-R2; 12 P-Q8(Q)ch 
and wins* 

9 K*B6 P-Kt6 

10 B-K5 

Not 10 B-B2, K-B2 ; 11 B-Kt6ch, K*Q3 and 
draws. The text threatens KTS7. 

10 , , , , R-R4 

If 10 . . . R-R7 ; 11 B-Q4 wins. 

11 B.Q4 R-QKt4 


12 K-Kt61 R-Q4 

13 B-B6oh K-B2 

14 P-K7! ! KxP 

15 K*B7 and wins. 


Book Reviews 

WHITE TO PLAY AND WIN 
By Weaver W + Adams $ .75 

About the turn of the century, Boston gave 
us a strikingly original chess theorist, Franklin 
K. Young, Now the same city presents us 
with a chess thinker who is equally original 
but has the merit of being much closer to 
actual practice. This reviewer cannot agree 
with the central thesis of the book, believing 
as he does that our knowledge of chess is still 
inadequate to enable us to affirm that the first 
move is sufficient of an advantage (some theo- 
rists have claimed that it is not an advantage, 
while others have almost claimed that it is a 
disadvantage!!) to win the game. 

Nevertheless, it can emphatically be said 
that this is an extremely interesting and read- 
able book, packed with stimulating ideas which 
will help many amateurs to vitalize and im- 
prove their play. An especially attractive fea- 
ture is the great number of elegant games which 
are used for illustrative purposes, — -F,R, 

PRACTICAL ENDGAME PLAY 
By Fred Reimfeld $2,00 

We have had many endgame treatises which 
deal with fundamental "book” positions. The 
unfortunate thing is that such positions crop 
up once in the proverbial lifetime as far as 
the amateur is concerned, so that such books 
do not help him much in his own games, 
Reinfeld's book is therefore a pioneer in spirit, 
outlook, method and content. For what he 
has in mind us to deal with the kind of endings 
that occur in actual play , His book has there- 
fore an immense value for players who want 
to improve their over-th e-board play. The 
book is systematically divided into four in- 
structive divisions: Transition to a Won End- 
ing; Transition to a Lost Ending; Missed 
Opportunities; Defending Difficult Positions, 


Greenwich Village 
Landmark 


CHUMLEY'S 


Rendezvous of 
Celebrities 


Where Chessplayers Find a Friendly Club-like Atmosphere 
WINES * BEERS • LIQUORS 
Excellent Cuisine Dinners 55c — $1,00 

Chess and Games Paraphernalia Always Available 
Experts' Night Every Monday 

85 Bedford Street, N, Y, C. 1 block off 7th Ave, at Barrow St 

Telephone CH 2-9512 Christopher St, I RT subway station 


April, 1940 


65 


These topics are illumined by the painstaking 
analysis and discussion of 62 characteristic end- 
game positions, all taken from actual play, 
The usefulness of the book is greatly enhanced 
by two exhaustive indices of types of endings 
and endgame motifs, — l.A.H. 


The Keres-Euwe Match 


(One careless move practically decides the 
issue,) 

Match 1939-1940 
(Tenth Game) 

INDIAN DEFENSE 


(Notes by Dr, M* Euwe) 

P. Keres Dr, M, Euwe 

White Black 


1 P-Q4 

2 P-QB4 

3 Kt-QB3 

4 Q-B2 

5 P-K3 


Kt-KB3 

P~K3 

B-Kt5 

Kt-B3 


5 Kt-B3 is generally considered stronger, in 
order to prevent „ , . P-K4. However, Keres 
wants to try a different variation, 

5 . , . . P-K4 

6 PxP , , . . 

Better than 6 P-Q5 (as in Keres-Alekhine, 
Dresden 1936), 

6 . . . . KtxP 

7 B-Q2 P-Q3 

8 P-QR3 BxKt 

3 . . . B-R4; 9 P-QKt4, B-Kt3 also deserved 
consideration; hut in that event the KB would 
always be in acute danger. 

9 BxB O-O? 

10 Kt»B3? 

Both players overlook that White -can ob- 
tain a clear advantage with 10 P-B51 After 
10 . . . R-Klj 11 0-0-0, P-Q4; 12 Kt-B3 White 
would .have a very strong attacking position. 
Thus it is clear that Black should have played 
9 . . . Q-K2. 

10 ... - KKt-Q2 

In order to maintain the strong Kt on K4 
as long as 'possible, , , , KtxKtch would -be 
too risky -because White can still castle Q -side. 

11 B-K2 Q-K2 

12 R-Q1 KtxKtch 

This exchange is now unobjectionable be- 
cause White's Q side castling is impossible. 

13 PxKt .... 

■Somewhat risky. White accepts a weaken- 
ing of his P position and virtually abandons 
K side castling, without obtaining compensat- 
ing attacking chances on the KKt file. Sounder 
was 13 BxKt, . Kt-K4; 14 BTC2, B-Q2 (14 . , . 
B-K3? 15 P-B5 ! ) . 

13 ... . P-KB4 

It is important to safeguard the KKtP at 
once. The text provides for . . , R-B2. 

14 R-KKtl .... 


After 14 0-0 (intending K-Rl and R-KKtl) 
Blank could seize the initiative with , , . P-B6, 

14 ... . R-B2 

15 Q-Q2 , , , . 

Preventing 15 . . ,. P-QKt3? which would be 
answered with decisive effect by 16 Q-Q5 
threatening QxR and RxPch, 


Dr. Euwe 



Keres 


15 ... - Kt*B3? 

Indicated was 15 . . . Kt-B4; 16 P-Kt4, Kt- 
K3; 17 P-B4, B-Q2 with a satisfactory game 
in every respect for Black. 

16 P-B5! .... 

Black has overlooked this advance a second 
Lime, -but not so White, And this time it is 
a much more serious matter than on move 10, 
The threat is 17 PxP winning a P, 

16 . . . PxP? would lose at once because of 
17 Q-Q-8ch etc. Nor does 16 . . . Kt-Kl help 
because of 17 Q-Q5, K-Rl (17 . . . B-K3; 18 
QxKtP) ; 18 E-B4, R-B-l; 19 PxP, PxP; 20 
K-K2 with a winning attack. 


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THE CHESS REVIEW 

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<56 


The Chess Re'vi e w 


Black prefers to give up 2 Ps, hoping for 
counter play on the K si tie. 


16 . . * . 

P-Q4 

17 BxKt 

QxB 

IS QxP 

B-K3 

Wliite threatened B-B4. 

19 QxKtP 

QR K B1 

20 P-B4 

i ■ » * 

Directed against + t , P-B5. 

20 . * * , 

R-K2 

21 R Q2 

B-B2 

22 QxRP 

G-R5 


With the double threat of,., QxRP and RxP. 
Black is 3 Ps down, but he can regain 2 of 
them. However, the ending is untenable. The 
remaining play, during which both players 
were short of time until the 41st move, is 
easy to understand- 


23 

Q-Kt7 

RxP 

33 BxB 

RxB 

24 

Q-Kt2! 

P Kt3 

34 P.K14 

K-K2 

25 

Q-Kt5 

R-R 6 

35 K Q2 

P-R4 

26 

QxQ 

RxQ 

36 P-R5 

R-R3 

27 

R-Q4 

RxRP 

37 K-B3 

R-R1 

28 

B-B3 

B-K1 

38 P-B 6 

R-R1 

29 

P-R4 

R-B3 

39 P-Kt5 

P-R5 

30 

R-R 1 

RxRch 

40 P-Kt 6 

PxP 

31 

BxR 

K-B2 

41 PxP 

P-R6 

32 

B-Kt7 

B-B3 

42 P-K17 

P-R7 


43 

R-Q1 

R-Q1 


The last 

chance. 




44 

RxR 

P R3(0) 



45 

P-Kt 8 (Q) 

Q-B8ch 



46 

K-Kt4 

Q-Kt7ch 



47 

K-R5 

Q-B 6 c h 



48 

K-Kt 6 

14 4 1 



(Another way was 48 Q-Kt4ch, QxQch ; 49 
KxQ r KxR; 50 K-Kt5 and White wins the 
ending thanks to the tempo move P-B3---J.B.S.) 

48 . . . . Q-Kt5ch 

49 K-B7 Resigns 

(Trims hi ted from die Haags eke Com runt by JJB,S.) 


(Surprise: Ernie's first move!) 
Match 1 939-1 940 
(First Game) 

BUY LOPEZ 


Dr* M. Euwe 

White 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

3 

B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

4 

B-R4 

Kt-B3 

5 

0-0 

B-K 2 

6 

R-K 1 

P-Q Kt4 

7 

B-Kt3 

P-Q3 

8 

P-B3 

0-0 

9 

P-Q4 

B-Kt5 

10 

P Q5 

Kt-QR4 


P* Keres 

Black 


11 

B-B2 

Kt-K1 

12 

QK 1 -Q 2 

P-Kt3 

13 

P-QR4 

P-QB4 

14 

PxP e.p. 

P-Kt5 

15 

Kt-BI 

KtxP 

16 

B-R3 

Kt-Kt 2 

17 

Kt-K3 

B-K3 

18 

PxP 

R-Ktl 

19 

P-Kt5 

PxP 

20 

PxP 

RxP 



The above photo illustrates some of the 
pieces from an unusually handsome ivory 
chess set which we have for sale, In- 
quiries are invited, and should be ad- 
dressed to THE CHESS REVIEW, 25 
West 43rd Street, New York, N. Y. 


21 

B~R4 

R-B4 

22 

Q-Q 2 

Q-Ktl 

23 

KR-QB1 

R-B1 

24 

RxR 

PxR 

25 

BxQKt 

RxB 

£6 

Kt-Q5 

B-Q1 


27 

B-Kt5 

R-Q3 

28 

BxB 

QxB 

29 

KtxP 

BxKt 

30 

PxB 

RxP 

31 

Q-K 1 

Drawn 


Characteristic of the many sorrowful com- 
ments that have reached us on the death of 
Harold Morton was this one from our Problem 
Editor: 

Poor Morton! He was one of the most 
likable people in chess. I Erst met him in 
Cambridge ten years ago, and still remember 
how one time when we were hard up to find 
someone strong enough to give the Freshmen a 
simultaneous he leaped into the breach, broke 
a pressing -engagement, and devoted an evening 
to entertaining us dubs — without any reward, 
at that. We had a lot of good times over 
the board jn his Boston days, and I can't get 
accustomed to the idea that he has really gone,” 

From Weaver W. Adams, Morton's friendly 
rival for many years: "Mortons death was very 
shocking. We shall miss his ready wit and 
genial’ company / 1 





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Problem Department 

By Vincent L* Eaton 

Address all correspondence relating to this department to V.L, Eaton , 2237 Q Street, N. W* t Washington, D.C. 
Questions About Problem Matters Will Be Answered If Accompanied By Return Postage, 


We report with sorrow the death of our 
able contributor and colleague, young Morris 
Hochberg. An invalid for many years, Mr. 
Hochberg had not allowed circumstance to 
down him: to speak only of his chess ac- 
complishments, he .had become an excellent 
solver, composer, and critic of problems, and 
for more than a year had collaborated (with 
his brother Isador) in editing the problem sec- 
tion of the C.C.L.A* Bulletin. It will seem 
strange to see the familiar initials “I. and M.” 
no more over a problem, or in a solving list, 
or signed to a kindly letter. Our very deep 
sympathies go to the surviving family, 

+ * * * * 

Results in our recent solving and composing 
tourneys are now being compiled, and they will 
appear in the May Review* 

# # !fc # # 

Our indefatigable contributor, Mr. P. L. Roth- 
enberg, who likes to seek out the unusual in 
chess problem strategy, has worked out some 
interesting variations on an old Loyd theme 
which supply the material for this month's 
article. For the solver's and printer’s con- 
venience, we have grouped the "original” and 
“quoted” problems separately. 

UNDERPROM OTION TO KNIGHT- 

FAR AFIELD 

By P* L* Rothenberg 

The theme is not original. I wish it were! 
It all started when Sam Loyd’s fascinating, 
inimitable problems began to fire my limited 
imagination* Nos* 1591-4 inclusive appear, re- 
spectively as 616, 617, 618, and 619 in Alain 
C. White's s< £am Loyd and his Chess Problems.” 
Loyd is quoted (p. 403): 'T do not feel that 
I have done the subject justice in any of 
these illustrations, but they will suffice to 
give my readers a hint or two.” Of No. 1591 
Loyd says, in his usual style (p* 403) : "If the 
capture seems a hopeless move * ♦ . then it 
is obviously well concealed, and the most 
difficult key move that could be selected. The 
nature of the key move is of no consequence 
whatever ...” 

The theme involves White underpromotion 
Lo a Knight, which is so remote from the 
enemy King that it can neither check him 
nor control any of the King’s adjacent squares. 
Nos. 1591-3 illustrate blocking of a Black piece, 
the first two directly, the last indirectly; and 
No. 1594 shows capture by the Knight alter- 
natively of one of two defending Black pieces* 
I have tried to apply the theme to grab and 
clearance play. Collectively, these offerings 
are not at all enigmatic, for once the key of 
one problem is obtained, the solutions of the 
others follow with ease, They are therefore 
being presented rather as a study. Individually, 
some are difficult, and one can imagine how 
hard it was to compose them by examining 
closely the final position. 

68 


In No, 1582 we encounter the necessity of 
blocking a Black Pawn. Solvers may be in- 
terested in observing why 1 P-R& (Q) does 
NOT work, and the proper key move does. 

Nos, 1583-6, inclusive, deal with the "grab” 
theme, involving Black Pawn, Knight, Bishop, 
and Rook in order. No* 1583 is somewhat 
weak, having been composed to complete the 
cycle; No. 1584 shows grab of a Knight in an 
eight-spoke wheel; a semi-wheel was presented 
in Shinkman’s pretty No. 1595. 

No. 1585 is a Meredith, with a number of 
tries, notably 1 F-R8(R), In No. 1586 we have 
a complete waiting position, with added variety 
from the key .move, which opens the seventh 
rank and allows the Rook to have maximum 
mobility, 

No, 1596 blends a chase of the Black Rock 
with blocking a Black Pawn, an idea carried 
out in slightly different form in No. 1587. In 
both these problems the promoted Knight is 
of aid in two thematic variations, rather than 
one* 

No. 1588 doubles the grab theme, to Include 
Bishop and Rook. Here, as in some of the 
other examples, there are some of the short 
mutes that seem inherent in grab strategy. 
An amusing try Is 1 QxB, RxB; 2 PxR stale- 
mate! No* 1597 shows a twofold block of a 
Black Bishop by anticipation— a kind of doub- 
ling of the central idea of No. 1591. In No, 
1589 we find another position without a set 
waiting move, and by extending the Black 
Queen's mobility we combine block and grab 
strategy. No. 1598 shows an allied idea: eli- 
minating a Black Rook’s control of a line by 
interposition of the promoted Knight* 

No, 1590 illustrates the clearance idea, The 
set position does not. show any immediate 
possibility of clearing the seventh rank, and 
the result may be surprising* Finally, No. 
1599 masterfully presents the square-vacation 
theme, involving the "finding of a place under 
the sun” for the ambitious White (Rook* 

To be frank, I have not explored the field 
exhaustively; more may have been done, and 
much more, certainly, can be done. The lover 
of problems who follows this idea through 
its various forms of expression will invariably 
find the result most pleasing* The enigmatic 
aspects of problem chess fascinated Sam Loyd 
and continue today to fascinate his admirers* 


INFORMAL LADDER 

(Maximum score for Nos* 1519-1536: 75) 
*F, Sprenger 916, 29; W. O, Jens 852, 38; 
T. McKenna 795, 58; ^W. Ratz 779, 36; 

L, Rothenberg 683, 69; *J* Hannus 663, 34; 
G, Fairley 5G4 f 63 {it was by Shiukman) ; K. Lay 
571, 32; A. Tauher 519, 69; *1, Burstein 556; 
Dr* M* Herzberger 500; A.A.J* Grant 427, 42 
(appreciate your painstaking accuracy, but 
keys only will suffice for solutions); J* M. 
Dennison 425, 47; ^^Dr, G. Dobbs 417, 65 
(your faithful contributions are much appreci- 
ated) ; B* M. Marshall 404, 21 (don't miss the 


April, 1940 


69 


NO. 1573 

R. C. BEITO 
Willmar, Minn, 



Mate m 2 


No. 1574 

WILL C. DQD 
Oxford, Ohio 

Dedicated to Dr. P, G, Keeney 



Mate iu 2 


No. 1575 

DR, GILBERT DOBBS 
Carrollton, Ga. 



Mate in 2 


Original Section 

No, 157G 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 



Mate in 2 


No, 1577 

DR. P. G. KEENEY 
Bellevue, Ky, 



Mate in 2 


No, 1578 

AUREL TAUBER 

New York, N. Y. 



Mate in 2 


No, 1570 

OTTO WURZBURG 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Dedicated to The Problem Editor- 



Mate in 3 


No, 1580 

THOMAS S* McKENNA 
Lima, Ohio 




m 1 


m t m mi 


s^iss m 

§§f 

USB! 



Mate in 4 


No, 1581 

DR. GILBERT DOBBS 
Carrollton, Ga. 



SE'LFmate m 5 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE MAY 25th, 1940. 











70 


The Chess Review 


Original Section (cont’d) 


No, 1582 

P, L. ROTHENBERG and 


THE PROBLEM EDITOR 



Mate in 3 


No, 1585 

P. L. ROTH ENBERG 
New York, N. Y, 



Mate in 3 


Na 1588 

P. L. ROTHENBERG 


New York, N, Y. 



Mate in 3 


No + 1583 

P, L* ROTHENBERG 


No. 1586 

P. L. ROTHENBERG 


No. 1589 

P. L, ROTHENBERG 


New York, N, Y. 



Mate in 3 


New York, N. Y. New York, N. Y. 



Mate in 3 Mate in 4 


No, 1584 

P. L, ROTHENBERG 
New York, M, Y T 


No. 1587 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 
In Memoriam: Morris Hoohberg 


No. 1590 

P. L. ROTHENBERG 
New York, N. Y. 



Mate iii 3 Mate in 4^ Mate in 3 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE MAY 25th, 1940. 














April, 1940 


71 


Quoted Section 


No. 3.591 

SAM LOYD 

Holyoke Transcript, 1377 



Mate in 3 


No, 1592 

SAM LOYD 
Second Prize, 
Paris Tourney, 1867 



Mate in % 


No, 1593 

SAM LOYD 

Detroit Free Press, 1876 



Mate in 3 


No. 1594 

SAM LOYD 

American Chess Nuts, 1868 


I Ml I I 



Mate in 4 


No. 1595 

W. A. SHINKMAN 
Mirror of American Sports, 1884 



m m m m \ 

m m m m \ 

■ 8 § 

slpiFi 

n® | ® 

i m §jj 

iii m 

! 

■ ■ 


Mate in 3 


NO. 1596 

W. A* SHINKMAN 
Chess Players 1 ChronicEe, 1879 



Mate in 4 


No. 1597 

H. and J, BETTMANN 
Baltimore American. 1883 



Mate in 3 


No. 159$ 

E; FERBER 
Deutsche Warte, 1904 



Mate m 3 


No. 1599 

H. WITTWER 


First Prize “ex aequo,” 
Olympic Tourney, 1936 



Mate in 3 


THESE PROBLEMS ARE NOT SCORED ON THE SOLVERS' LADDER. 




















72 


The Chess Review 


May issue) ; Dr. W, F, Sheldon 423; P, A, Swart 
321, 30; I. Sap ir 328; B. Daly 251, 63 

{Morton’s death was a great blow); *Dr. P. G. 
Keeney 306 (correction received too late) ; 

Hochberg 193, 69; E. Popper 136, 63; *E« 
Korpanty 148, 38; J, Donaldson 155, 17; A. 
Fortier 135, 27; R. Neff 101, 61; Plow- 

man 94, 65; S, P. Shepard (am testing the 
problems) 117, 25; **1. Revise 43, 63; C, E. 
Winnberg 67, 34; V. Rosado 79; W, C* Dod 75 
(am tackling the two- Black -piece Knight 
wheel); B. L. Fader 63 (welcome; aline start); 
A, B, Hodges 57 (hope to see you in Washing- 
ton soon); **A. Sheftd 35; F* Grote 28; T. L, 
Goddard 24; J, Hudson (welcome; will write 
soon) 23; J. Dubin (welcome) 22; Bill Cfubb 
19; A. D. Gibbs 16 (excuse the misprint); R* 
W, Hays 8, 6 (good work; keep it tip). 


To Fred Sprenger, who makes another suc- 
cessful Ladder climb, and A. i>. Gibbs, who 
takes the quarterly three-move prize with No. 
1504, go sincere congratulations. 


No, 1519 


No. 1520 
No. 1521 


No. 1522 
No, 1523 


No. 1521 

No. 1525 

No, 1520 

No, 1527 

No. 1528 
No. 1520 

No, 1530 

NO, 1531 

No, 1532 


SOLUTIONS 

by J. M. Dennison: 1 QaG (Two points) 
Neal way of unpinning S lo discover 
check, closing the Black passageway — 
5 1 a r .shall. Con a i d c ra bio play — ^ b e pa rd . 

Amusing how T a potent While force must 
allow- Black cheeks before i bo coup do 
grace— Rot henberg, 

by Dr. G. Dobbs: 1 Rg? (Two points) 
(:bin piemen tary block play prettily echoed 
— Rot hen berg. Good try by 1 Kg 2— Patz, 
by Dr. G. Dobbs: 1 Sb3 (Two points) 
Good ha If pin crosscheck ’maneuvers in 
economic set t in g — 1 to t h a n h c; r g. Fe r m i t - 

ting check an d f o re i ng s e 1 f ! > I o < ■ k — -Mu r - 
shah. 

by the Problem Editor: 1 Kxc3 (Two 

points) 

by Dr. P. Q. Keeney: 1 Qd4 (Two points) 
Dr. Keeney is apparently exploring the 
intricacies of the fascinuling mutate — 
Itothenbcrg* Delightful, though the S at 
el reveals the key. Typical Keeney in- 
i rigue — Pat K. 

by Or. P. G, Keeney: 1 Qe5 (Two points) 
Complete block* Good'— Pat k The 

Queen waits lazily for Black to destroy 
himself — Fairley. 

by Burney M. Marshall: 1 Rh2 (Two 

points) 

Splendid interference ptay — Rothenherg. 
Mile unpinning and interference— Fairley, 
by Aurcl Tauber: 1 QhS (Two points) 

A neat idea which furnishes meat and 
substance for two cute miniatures — 
Shepard. Pretty ultimate task— Fairley, 
by AurcJ Tauber: 1 QaS intended, but 

there is a cook by 1 Qd5 (Two points 
each), (The author notes that a Black 
Pawn should be placed on el — which, 
however, spoils the "twin" effect.) 
by F. W. Watson: 1 Rdf> intended — a 
splendidly set mutate- — but 1 SeSch cooks 
(Two points each). 

by (Maude chi Beau: 1 (Three points) 

1 . . . KxP or RxQ (threat): 2 BcGch. 

I . , . KM; 2 QxF2ch, 1 . . . Rd L ; 2 QxR. 

I . . . BxB; 2 QxGch. 

V'ariat ions are fine in this confusing af- 
fair— RoLhcnbcrg, Had difficulty in find- 
ing the key — Patz. 

V>y Aural Tauber: 1 QhS (Three points) 

I , . . Bbl; 2 Qhl. 

1 * i n , b I oc k , an d Z u gz wan g — M e Ke n im, 
Excel lent corner- to -corner play with a 
leaping Queen — Dennison, (See Mr, Tau- 
ber's nrliele in the March Review — 
Ed i i or. ) 

by G. Fairley: Intended I Kh7 followed 
by 2 KgG or KgS and 3 Kg7 again, but 
cooked l>y 1 Kgl>. Kc8; 2 BcS ami 3 Fd7 
( 1 "our points each). 

by Aurcl Tauber: 1 RaS (Four points) 

1 , . , PxP; 2 RhS, K&4; 3 UxB, Pbp 
1 Hal mate, a complete Rook "merry-go- 
round.' r 1 . . . Kc4; 2 Ra8-dS, etc. 


This composer is certainly obtaining de- 
lectable results in the maximum range 
switchback theme. The sublime peri- 
pheral tasker — dto then berg. Tauber is 
certainly hitting the corner pockets this 
mon Mi— McKenna. 

No. 1533 by Herbert Thorne: X Pt;4 intended with 
difllcuil and entertaining variations* but. 
1 Qh3ch, Bh-i: 2 Pc-U also appears to 
w o r k (I Vo u r po i n t s each ) . 

No, 153 1 by Geoffrey Mott-Sniith: 1 Sd-1; 2 Qd3 ; 

3 53b3eh; 4 QdSch; J> Qc2eh: (i Qch-h; 7 
Khl (Seven points). 

No. 1535 by Geoffrey Mtrtt- Smith; 1 Rd5; 2 Qd3 
(or b3 ) : 8 QeSch; 4 BbSch; 5 Qc2eh: fi 
Qd 2ch ; 7 Qc2eh; 8 Qeleh: 9 Khl (Nine 
points). 

No. 153 by Geoffrey MoU-Smi(h: 1 Kc5; 2 Odd 
(or l>3): 3 Qe3ch; 1 Qc2cb; 5 lib-1 rh; 6 
Qf2oh; 7 Qc£ch; S Qd2oh; 3 Qe2rb: 10 Qcl 
ch ; 11 Khl (Nine points). 

Here is one '‘purist" who was nut afraid 
of the focal duals. The conceptions are 
brilliant — Rothenberg. A mover and 

pointed set — Fairley, 

No. 1537 by the Problem Editor: I Shtf 
No, 1538 by G, Protnislo: 1 Qe.7 
No. 1539 by F. A, ,U Kuskop: 1 PM 
No. 1540 by George Hume: 1 Kul 
No. 1541 by P. L. Rothenberg: The condition says 
"Male jit 1," and apparently White can 
play 1 Qc2. But we must demonstrate 
i he legality of the position Aral, (Solvers 
were warned!) While has fifteen men; 
(be others musl have been captured by 
the doubled BPa3. if Black is supposed 
to have moved last, the position is im- 
possible: the P's a 7 and d7 have never 
stirred, the P's e4, fa. g4. and h3 could 
not nave made captures (lids would as- 
sume 17 White men) or moved forward 
from other squares (they are blocked), 
the P a 3 could not. have moved from a 4 
or b4 (I he stiuates are occupied), and 
(be BN has no possible last. move. Hence 
it is Black 1 s turn to move, and White has 
just, played. To get his Pawns to c5, ffi, 
go. and hi, he must, hove captured Black's 
eight missing men with (hem) to get 
them past the P's c4, 15, g.p and h3 
respectively). Had he played Pel 4, Block 
would have had no previous move. Con- 
sequently we must conclude that he 
Played Pb2-b4. I Pat h's move prior to 
that having been PblxPhR. Therefore 
I ha k plays 1 . . . Ik- Ixl* en passant, 

and White mates by 2 Rxb3. (A fuller 
ex plana (ion. with an ingenious game- 
proof by Mr. Rotheiibeig, will be mailed 
to solvers on requesr. — Editor. ) 

No. 1542 by \V\ C. Dod: i Rg8ch. QxR; 2 JigTch, 

SxB: 3 QhTch, RxQ ; 4 SfTch. Clever 
building-up ol a matn-posiUou. 

No, 1543 by T, H, Dawson: (1) 1 . . . Qhl; 2 Bc8, 
QaS; 3 Pe4 mate. " 

, T (2) 1. . . . BxFch; 2 Bdt, Ba5; 3 Pel mate. 

No, 1544 by Dr. P. G, Keeney: intended 1 , 

O-O; 2 ] Vs7, Pbl(R): 3 PeS(Q), RbS; 4 

Qcfi male, but cooked several ways. The 
author noted, too late for correction, that 
(lie WJv should bo at ct, 

No. 1545 by Dr. P. G. Keeney: 1 , . . Pal {]_;)■ 

2 Bg3, PH (B); 3 T3h7 mate, 

Bound Volumes 
of 

The Chess Review ior 1939 

are now available 

Features Include :■ — 

* More than 225 picked games 

* 297 .selected problems 

* Accounts of notable tournaments 

* Important innovations in opening 
play 

* Articles of general interest 

* Cartoons and photographs 

Price: $3.50 

The Chess Review 

25 West 43rd St. New York City 


*7Jhe 



REVIEW 

HONOR PRIZE PROBLEM 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N. Y. 



WHITE MATES IN POUR MOVES 



The OFFICIAL ORGAN of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA CHESS FEDERATION 


The United States Championship Tournament 

MANHATTAN'MARSHALL MATCH * JOHN F. BARRY 
EUWE * REINFELD ❖ STURGIS * CHERNEV 


MAY, 1940 


MONTHLY 30 cents 


ANNUALLY $3.00 



Official Organ or the 
United States or America 
Chess Federation 


rjhe 


CHESS 

REVIEW 


I. A. Horowitz 
I'K n> Reinfecd 
Editor* 


Vol. VI H, No. 4 Published Monthly May } 1940 

Published monthly by The Chess Review, 25 Wes: 
43rd St., New York, N. Y. Telephone Wisconsin 
7-3742* Domestic subscriptions: One Year $3 00 i 
T w o Years '$5,50; Pi ve Y ears $12.50; Six Month s 
$1.75. Single copy 30 as* Foreign subscriptions: 
$3.50 per year except U. S. Possessions, Canada, Mex- 
ico, Central and Smith America. Single copy 35 as. 

Copyright 1939 by The Chess Review 

'Entered as second-class matter January 25, 1937, at 
the post office at New York, N. Y., under the Act 
of March 3, 1879/' 


APOLOGY 

We wish to ask the indulgence of our 
readers for the delay in (he appearance of 
this issue, due to a number of difficult 
circumstances. The June issue will ap- 
pear within a smaller interval than usual, 
in order to make up for lost time, and 
will contain the problem solutions omitted 
in the present number. 


THE POTENT PAWN 

We are chessmen in the hands of fortune, 
and sometimes the pawn may check the king*” 

—Ihn Khallikan (121 J - L 282) 

The leopard cannot change his spots, 

Nor wailing loon his cry so strange. 

The Ethiop can't change his skin 

But many ways, a pawn can change* 

You cannot check an avalanche 
Nor check a bullet on the wing; 

You cannot check on a busted bank, 

But a lowly pawn can check a king. 

So hail the mighty potent pawn, 

He's mong the greatest ever seen; 

For Essex didn't make Queen Bess, 

But any pawn can make a queen* 

— Bill Jones 


BELIEVE IT OR NOTl 

For the third time this year, the chess team 
of the California School for the Deaf has lost 
a match to the chess team of the California 
School for the Blindl 



SAMMY RESH EVSKY, shown here in a char- 
acteristic attitude, wins U. S. title for third 
consecutive time* See story beginning Page 74. 


ANOTHER CHILD PRODIGY? 

r 'David Selznick's boy, Jeffrey, age 8, is said 
to be a brilliant youngster,” Sidney Skolsky 
writes in the Neiv York livening Post, "He is 
a whiz at Chinese checkers, he can play back- 
gammon better than Sam Goldwyn, and he 
can beat any producer at chess.” 


CHESS ON THE “ALTMARK” 

An Australian sailor who was on the Alt - 
mark slated,” the Australian Chess Review re- 
ports, ” Boredom was really the worst problem. 
Charley Sogerblum, a naturalized Finn, made 
chessmen with a blunt table-knife and a bit of 
emery paper. At first only three or four could 
play, but all of us learned before we were 
rescued/ 


73 


THE U. S. CHAMPIONSHIP 


By Fred Reinfeld 


The Preliminaries 

. Section A 

G. Shams wit 6-1 

D, A* Hallman . . * 5-2 

A, S, Pinkus 5-2 

M, Saltzberg , , 4-3 

E. McCormick * . , 3-4 

N, Bernstein .*,*,**,.* 2-5 

B. Winkler 2-5 

E. S. Jackson . , 0-7 

Shainswit qualified rather easily- The other 
favorite, Pinkus, had an unexpectedly difficult 
time, mainly due to a setback at the hands of 
Winkler, and the surprise emergence of Hall- 
man as a threat to the leaders. In fact, it re- 
quired a 90-move (or was it only 70-move?!) 
defeat of Hallman by Shainswit (who dis- 
played commendable sportsmanship in thus 
playing for a win when he did not need it) 
to create a tie between Pinkus and Hallman, 
The latter's success was well merited, however. 
In the ensuing tie-match, Pinkus rallied and 
won, going on from there to a brilliant show- 
ing in the Finals, once the cruel anxieties of 
the Preliminaries had been removed, 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 


D. A* Hallman 
White 


B, Winkler 
Black 


1 P-K4 

P-QB4 

16 B-Q2 

B-Q1 

2 Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

17 B-B3 

B-K2 

3 P-Q4 

PxP 

18 Kt-Q4 

P-Kt3 

4 KtxP 

Kt-B3 

19 Q-K2 

Kt-KI 

5 Kt-QB3 

P-Q3 

20 Q-Kt4 

Kt-B3 

6 B-K2 

P-K3 

21 Q-R3 

P-K4 

7 0-0 

B-K2 

22 Kt(4) -B5 I 

PxKt 

8 K-R1 

0-0 

23 KtxP 

Kt-KI 

9 P-B4 

P-QR3 

Or 23 , * 

* K4U; 

10 Kt-Kt3 

P-QKt4 

24 PxP, PxP; 

25 BxP, 

11 B-Q3 

B-Kt2 

R-Bi; 26 Q-R6, R- 

12 Kt-K2 

Kt-QKtB 

KKtl ; 27 

BxKtch, 

13 P-QR3 

KtxB 

BxE ; 23 QxBch etc. 

14 PxKt 

R-B1 

24 Kt-R6ch 

Resigns 

15 Kt-Kt3 

Q-Q2 




(While's quiet browsing in the opening 
graduates into a slight ease of murder \) 

PETROFF DEFENSE 


A, S, Pinkus 
White 


M. Saltzberg 
Black 


1 P-K4 

2 Kt*KB3 

3 KtxP 

4 Kt-KB3 

5 Q-K2 


P-K4 

Kt-KB3 

P-Q3 

KtxP 

Q-K2 


6 P-Q3 

7 B-KtS 

8 Kt*B3 

9 P-Q4 
10 0 - 0-0 


Kt-KB3 

B-K3 

QKt-Q2 

Kt-Kt3? 

P-KR3? 


11 BxKt 

PxB 

26 K-Ktl 

K-Ktl 

12 P-Q5 

B-Kt5 

27 Kt-K6 

R-KR2 

13 Q-Kt5ch 

Q-Q2 

28 KtxP 

KtxP 

14 R-KIch 

B-K2 

29 KtxKt 

Q-B3 

15 Kt-Q4 

K-B1 

30 Q*Q4 

P-R5 

16 P-B3 

B-B4 

If 30 * . 

, K-Bl; 

17 Q-K2 

B-Kt3 

31 Kt-Bti, 


18 P-B4 

P-KB4 

31 R-K8ch 

RxR 

19 Q-B2 

P-KR4 

32 RxRch 

QxR 

20 B-Kt5 

Q-B1 

33 Kt-B6ch 

K-B1 

21 R-K2 

P-R3 

34 KtxQ 

KxKt 

22 KR-K1 

PxB 

35 QxQP 

R-R3 

23 RxB 

P-Kt5 

36 KxP 

P-Kt4 

24 Q-R4U 

PxKt 

37 K-R3 

R-R2 

25 Q-B6 

PxPch 

38 Q-KB6 

Resigns 


Section B 

S, N, Bernstein 6 -1 

M, Green 

J. Soudakoff ....... 5^-1 y 2 

K* Forster $y 2 „4y 2 

W, Murdock ...... 2l/ 2 -5i/ 2 

B, Friend 2 -5 

P, Banister 1 

T, Barton 1 .6 

This section was lightened by the with- 
drawal of Treystman, but proved tough enough 
all the same. Bernstein did himself proud, 
producing some beautiful chess in addition to 
a fine score. Green was the other favorite, 
but here Soudakoff took over the role of Hall- 
man, and made an excellent showing to create 
another tie* This was broken by a toss-up, 
won by Green, 


( A Pawn sacrifice is refuted by a Pawn 
sacrifice! ) 

RUY LOPEZ 


W, Murdock 
White 


J. Soudakoff 
Black 


1 

P*K4 

P-K4 

18 P-KKt3 

Q-R4 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

19 R-B2 

P-B5 

3 

B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

20 Q-KS 

P-Q 5 

4 

B-R4 

Kt-B3 

21 PxP 

P-B4! 

5 

0-0 

KtxP 

22 PxP e.p* 

KR-K1 

6 

P-Q4 

P-Q Kt4 

23 Q-QB3 

P-Kt5I 

7 

B-Kt3 

P-Q4 

24 QxKtP 

Q*R6 

8 

PxP 

B-K3 

25 Q-B3 

R-K8ch! 

9 

P-B3 

B-K2 

26 QxR 

QxPch 

10 

QKt-Q2 

KtxKt 

27 K-B1 

B*R6ch 

11 

QxKt 

Kt-R4 

28 K-K2 

R*K1ch 

12 

B-B2 

P-Q B4 

29 K-Q2 

P-BGch 

13 

Q-K2 

0-0 

30 K-Q1 

B«Kt5ch 

14 

P-KR4?! 

BxP 

31 R-K2 

BxRch 

15 

KtxB 

QxKt 

32 QxB 

Q- Kt8ch 

16 

P-KB4 

B-K15 

Resigns 


17 

Q-Q3 

QR-Q1 




74 


May, 1940 


75 


(A very well-played game by While ) 

INDIAN DEFENSE 



S. N. Bernstein 


B. Friend 


White 


Black 


1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

24 

KtxR 

QxQ 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K 3 

25 

BxQ 

KxKt 

3 

Kt-KB3 

P-QKt3 

26 

QR-B1 

B-Q3 

4 

P-K Kt3 

B-Kt2 

27 

B-B6 

B-Q4 

5 

B-Kt2 

B-Kt5ch 

28 

R-K3 

P-QR4 

6 

B-Q2 

Q-K2 

29 

B-Q4 

P-Kt4 

7 

0-0 

0-0? 

30 

B-B5 

K-K2 

8 

B^Kt5 

P-Q4 

31 

P-QR3 

P-Kt5 

9 

Kt-K5 

B-Q3 

32 

BxBch 

KxB 

10 

Kt-QB3 

P-B3 

33 

P-B3 

R-QKtl 

11 

Kt-Kt4 

QKt-Q2 

34 

R-B2 

R-QR1 

12 

P-K4 

PxKP 

35 

K-B2 

R-QKtl 

13 

KtxP 

K-R1 

36 

P-Kt4 

R-QR1 

14 

R-K1 

B-B2 

37 

K-K13 

R-KKtl 

15 

P-Q 5 

BPxP 

33 

K-R4 

P-B3 

16 

PxP 

BxQP 

39 

K-R5 

P-B4 

17 

Kt{K4)xKt PxKt 

40 

PxP 

PxP 

18 

B-R4 

Q-Q3 

41 

R-Q3 

R-QKtl 


If 18 - 

. . BxB; 19 

42 

P-QR4 

R-Q1 

QxKU! 


43 

RxBch 

KxR 

19 

KtxP 

BxB 

44 

R-Q2ch 

K-B5 

20 

Q-R5 

Q-Q0 

45 

RxR 

K-Kt6 

21 

KtxKt 

B-B6 

46 

R-Q2 

KxP 

22 

B-B6ch 

K-Ktl 

47 

K-Kt5 

Resigns 

23 

Q-Kt5ch 

Q-K13 






Suction C 



H. 

Seidman . . . 


7 -1 



I\ Reinfeld . + . , 

P « 4 

61/ 2 -l l/ 2 



O. 

Ulvestad , , . 


6/ 2 -l l/ 2 



J, Battell 


4/ 2 - 3/2 



J. Feldman . - . . 


4 -4 



J. Khotimlansky 

+ ■ -i 

3 -5 



J, Fulop 

. T . 

2 ^- 5l /2 



W. 

Frere 


2 -6 



A. 

Raettig . . . . 


0 -8 



This was recognized as a dog-fight from the 
start, with three outstanding contenders for 
the two qualifying places- Seidman played 
superior and on the whole steady chess, well 
deserving his place- Reinfeld and Ulvestad 
assembled their scores by strangely divergent 
methods, the former devoting himself to win- 
ning almost drawn endings, and the latter to 
winning almost lost games! The result was 
the same, and here a toss-up again decided the 
issue. For a while Feldman loomed as a 
threat, but three consecutive defeats to the 
leaders put an end to his chances, and ulti- 
mately he was overtaken by Battel 1 n who thus 
turned in a most creditable performance, 

(A reminder of man's mortality!) 

french defense 

H* Seidman 0. Ulvestad 

White Black 


9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 
17 
IS 

19 

20 
21 
22 

23 

24 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 



SEIDMAN 

0-0 

PxP 

25 R-R3 

P-R3 

Kt“QR4 

P-Q Kt4 

26 PxB P 

Q-Q3 

Kt-B5 

B-Kt3 

White 

can now 

P-Q Kt4 

Q-K2 

mate in six; 27 QxP 

K KtxP 

BxKt 

ch! KtxQ; 28 RxKt 

PxB 

QxP 

ch, K-Ktl 

; 29 U-R7eh, 

B-K3 

KtxKt 

K-B2 ; 30 

B-KtSch* K- 

BxKt 

Q-K2 

Ktl; 31 P-B7ch, ItxP; 

P-KKt4 

0-0 

32 R-R8 mate, 

Q-K1 

B-Q2 

27 BxR 

QPxB 

Q-Kt3 

K-R1 

28 P-B3 

R-B2 

B-Q3 

P-B4 

29 K-B2 

B-B3 

PxP e.p, 

PxP 

30 QxPch 

Resigns 

P-Kt5 

Kt-Ktl 

For if 

30 . . . Kt 

Q-R4 

QR-B1 

xQ; 31 

RxKteh, R- 

R-B3 

R-B5 

112; 32 P-B7eh etc. 


QUEEN’S 

GAMBIT 


F. Reinfeld 

J. s. 

Battell 

White 


Black 

Kt-KB3 

P-Q4 

6 PxP 

Q-B2 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

7 Q-Kt3 

B-K3? 

P-B4 

PxP 

8 BxB 1 1 

QxBch 

P-K3 

P-B4 

9 K-K2 

QxR 

BxP 

PxP 

10 BxPch 

K-Q1 


Battel! 



Reinfeld 


1 

P.K4 

P-K 3 

5 P-B4 

Kt-R3 

11 QxP 

Q-B8 

15 

Q-Q5ch 

2 

P-Q4 

P-Q4 

6 Kt-B3 

P-QB4 

12 QxR 

QxPch 

16 

Q-B5ch 

3 

K1-QB3 

B-Kt5 

7 P-QR3 

B-R4 

13 QKt-Q2 

Kt-K5 

17 

B-K6 

4 

P-K5 

P-QR3 

8 B-K2 

Kt-B3 

14 QxKt 

QxR 


K-B2 
K-Q1 
Reslg ns 



76 


T H n C h e s s R li v i J-: w 


The Finals 

Since the recent American Championship 
Tournament was one of the most bitterly fought 
tournaments in all chess history, Sammy Resh- 
evsky deserves even more credit for winning 
it than for his tw r o previous victories in the 
same event, Reshevsky had need of all the 
skill and all the grit for which he is noted, 
as he was seriously ill during much of the tour- 
nament and played several games in agony. 
To add further point to this fine showing, 
Reshevsky repeated his feat of not losing a 
game throughout the tournament. 

By pure chance, Reshevsky happened to be 
paired with Fine in the last round, the result 
being a dramatic struggle worthy of so tense 
an occasion. Reshevsky had fought his way 
to the top and gone into the lead by winning 
an exceptionally taxing game from Kashdan 
in 56 moves, defeating Pinkus in a beautiful 
game, then drawing with Reinfeld, and beating 
Kupchik in a tenacious battle which went no 
less than 81 moves; the upshot being that 
Reshevsky went into the final round a half- 
point ahead of Fine, needing only a draw to 
clinch the title, Fine wisely adopted an ob- 
scure variation in which Reshevsky seemed 
unable to find his bearings. It soon became 
clear that Reshevsky Ts game was hopeless, and 
one of the spectators told me later that there 
were tears in Reshevsky s eyes as he realized 
that he had a lost game. It must have been 
the most miserable moment of his life! But 
just at this point, where most players would 
have given up all hope, he kept on fighting, 
and an inexact move by Fine enabled the 
champion to draw this fateful game. 

Fine once more justified his great reputation, 
although he was by no means in his best form, 
Superior technique and hard plugging had to 
make up for what was lacking, and he played 
with almost superhuman determination. In 
the course of three championship tournaments, 
it has now become quite clear that it is this 
element of superb pluck which above all 
separates Reshevsky and Fine from all their 
competitors. 

Kashdan showed a welcome return to his 
grand form of about ten years ago, and ac- 
tually led the tournament until the thirteenth 
round, when he lost the "war of nerves" to 
Reshevsky. In the following round, a loss to 
Adams (who produced a magnificent game) 
pulled him down still further. But it speaks 
well for Kashdan that he was the only player 
who was able to remain in the vicinity of 
Reshevsky and Fine! 

Pinkus made a further approach to his su- 



KASHDAN 


perh form of the late ’20s and played some of 
the most interesting and steadiest chess of the 
tournament to obtain his high place. Simonson, 
on the other hand, after his sensational show- 
ings in previous championships, was something 
oi a disappointment. He started out poorly, 
but came up fast at the end and thus managed 
to join the ranks of the prize-winners. Only 
by more intensive study and practice can he 
do himself full justice. 

Denker's start was likewise an unfortunate 
one, so much so that he was unable to make an 
even score until the eleventh round. But he 
finished strongly, ending up with a very credit- 
able score, His games were perhaps the most 
interesting of the tournament. As for Kup- 
chik, one has to pay tribute to his marvellously 
sure instinct for fine position play and his 
wonderfully quick sight of the board in all 
types of positions — valuable qualities for a 
player who has never bothered to make a 
thorough study of the openings, and who has 
to cede his competitors so much of a handicap 
in age. 

The fighting character of the tournament is 
indicated by the quadruple tie for eighth place 
with a negative score! The players involved 
in this tic gave the tournament body just as 
does the string section in a great symphony 
orchestra. 

Bernstein played perhaps the hardest fight- 
ing chess of this group, especially in overcom- 
ing the debilitating effects of a cold during the 
early rounds, Pollan d made a miserable start, 
and although he was likewise ill for several 
rounds, he made a game finish to pull out of 
the depths of the second division, Reinf eld's 
score was the most peculiar of all, as he won 
only one game and drew thirteen; his in- 
creased steadiness and resourcefulness may be 
attributed to a profound study of Reshevsky 's 
games. Shainswit is a very gifted player, with 
all the poise of a veteran, and with a little 
luck he might well have come higher. His 



M a y , 1 9 4 0 


77 





Bernstein 


8 -Green 
Hanouer 
•Koshdan 
^•Kupchik 

7 .Ltrtmcm 
Pinkus 
Poiland 
Seinfeld 
PcshevskY 
Seidman 

Shnns^i 


•mm m 


L. WALTER STEPHENS, Tournament Director 


desire to prolong a non- losing streak inherited 
from the Manhattan C. C. Championship prob- 
ably militated against Ids putting forth his best 
efforts. Incidental I y, mention should be made 
of his game with Woliston, which produced 
the most amazing position of the whole tour- 
nament! 

Adams played extremely well after his heart- 
breaking start, in which he lost three games in 
a row, despite excellent positions in each (one 
of these was the unfortunate encounter with 
Simonson) , At his best, Adams plays with 
a distinguished artistry which makes for fas- 
cinating chess. His endgame play is often of 
a high order, and now that he is on better 
terms with his clock, his scores should profit 
accordingly, Seidman is one of the most prom- 
ising of our younger players, but for two- 
thirds of the way his score languished. A 
good finish, however, enabled him to end up 
wi th an excellent score. 

Green and Hanauer were among the outstand- 
ing disappointments — Green because he started 
out very strongly and fizzled toward the end, 
while Hammer seemed out of form from the start. 


As far as the score is concerned, Woliston 
and Littman were ejuite outclassed, lacking 
the necessary experience for so formidable a 
contest. However, they put up a strong fight 
in many of their individual games, as for ex- 
ample Littman' s 57-move draw against Kash- 
dan, and his 62 -move struggle against Rcsh- 
evsky before surrendering. 

It should be added that the following players 
were working during the tournament, and hence 
their scores should be viewed a bit charitably! 
— Pinkus, Simonson, Denker, Kupchik, Rein- 
feld, Seidman (school!), Green and Hanauer. 

The Women’s Championship resulted in a 
splendid victory for Mrs. Rivero, whose fine 
score of 7-1 gave her a comfortable lead over 
her nearest competitors, In addition to the 
title, she received an engraved silver service 
tray donated by George Ihnlen Roosevelt, as 
well as the Hazel Allen Cup. 

This account would not be complete without 
an acknowledgment of the unceasing labors on 
behalf of the tournament by the Tournament 
Director, L. Walter Stephens, and by Mrs. 
Stephens and Mrs. Marshall. 






78 


The Chkss Review 


UNITE D ST ATES CHAMPIONS HIP TOURNEY 


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2 —14 


WOMEN'S CHAMPIONSHIP 


Mrs. Rivero * 

7 —I 

Miss Karff 

5y 2 -2i / 2 

Mrs. Greaser 

5 —3 

Dr. Weissenstein * 

5 — 3 

Mrs. Bain 

4&-3& 

Mrs. McCready 

4i/ 2 - 5 i/ 2 

Mrs. Harmath , , + 

2 1^—5 Y 2 

Miss Raettig 

1 7 

Miss Wray 

1 —7 


(Alfred Kreymborg relates in his an f obi- 
ography * 'Troubadour” that Dr. Lasker once 
said t f TJ you see a good mope , don't make it 
—i look for a belter one” Excellent advice, 
but it s apt to make life strenuous. Look at 
Fine's 27th move*) 


TWO KNIGHTS' DEFENSE 

(Notes by Fred Reinfeld) 


R. Fine 
White 


S. Reshevsky 
Black 


1 P-K4 P*K4 

2 Kt-KB3 Kt*QB3 

3 B-B4 Kt-B3 

That this opening* which was considered an 
antique until very recently, should be adopted 
in this crucial game, is an indication of how 
sharply opening theory has veered. However, 
Fine knows what he is about: he is adopting 
a line of play with which he is thoroughly 
familiar, in the hope of exploiting Reshevsky's 
un familiarity with it. And so it turns out. 


4 KLKtS 

5 PxP 

6 B-Kt5ch 

7 PxP 


P-04 

Kt-QR4 

P-B3 

PxP 


8 B-K2 

9 Kt-KB3 

10 Kt-K5 

11 P-B4 


P-KR3 

P-K5 

B-Q3 

QB2 


An inexactitude. For almost a century this 
variation was considered unfavorable for 
White, who got into hot water by trying to 


retain the P won on move 5. Dr. Lasker was 
the first, I believe* to popularize the idea of 
returning the extra P in return for compensat- 
ing strategical advantages* Had Reshevsky 
known of this idea, he would have played more 
the accurate 11 . . * 0-0; 12 0-0* RxKt; 13 PxB* 
Q-Q5ch; 14 K-Rl, QxKP and Black is a vital 
tempo to the good in comparison to the line 
of play which actually occurs. This would 
have prevented* for example, White's later 
powerful sacrifice of the exchange* 


12 0*0 

13 Kt»QB3 

14 PxB 

15 P-Q4 

16 QxP 

17 B-B41 


0-0 
BxKt 
QxP 
PxP e*p* 
Kt*Kt5 
Q~B4ch 


As White has so considerable an advantage 
in development, Black sees no plausible alter- 
native to the gain of the exchange. 


18 K-R1 Kt-B7ch 

19 RxKt QxR 

20 R-KB1 Q.R5 

The Q is anything but comfortable here, and 
the Q side is left in dire need of reinforce- 
ments. But after 30 * . . Q-Kt3; 21 Q-Kt3 ! 
threatening BxP or E-B7 (and in some in- 
stances Kt-Kl) Black would be in a bad way. 

21 Q-Q6 B-Kt5? 

Reshevsky soon has cause for bitter regret 
after this additional loss of time, for Fine's 
reply makes the stranded Kt whisper a feeble 
S* O. S, 21 , , . B-K3 had to be played, 

22 B-R61 B-B1 

23 B-Q3I B-K3 

24 Q-Kt4 Q.R4 

If instead £4 , * . Q-Ql; 35 Q-K4, P-Kt3 (or 

25 , . * R-Kl; 26 Q-R7ch f K-Bl ; 27 Kt-K4, Kt- 
Kt2; 23 Q-R8ch with a devastating attack); 

26 BxP, R-Kl (not 26 B-B4; 27 RxB and wins); 
25 Q-K5* P-B3; 27 Q-Kt3 and wins. 

Had Black played 21 . * * B-K3, he could 
have answered 22 Q-Kt4 with 22 * . . Q-QR for 
on 23 B-Q3 he has time for 23 * * , B-Q4 to be 
followed by * * * Q-KtS* 


May, \ 940 


79 


25 B-B7! Kt-B5? 1 

Me clutches at a straw. 


26 BxKt Q-R5 

Reshevsky 



Fine 


among the spectators who tittered and gloated 
over “such blunders’ * 1 2 3 * * * 7 8 9 10 11 12 * * * 16 and those who whined 
about “such terrible chess/’ Frank criticism 
can teach us much that is valuable about 
chess; criticism mingled with contempt teaches 
us little about chess, but a lot about people 



The crucial position! White can now hold 
everything with 27 R-B4 {or even 27 P-QK13, 
which is not quite so good). But now it is 
Fine's turn to blunder. 

27 B-B4? .... 

Foreseeing the following: 27 . . , BxB ; 2ft 
QxB, P*Kt4 ; 29 P-KKt3, Q-Kt5; 30 Kt'K4 and 
with the murderous threat of Kt BGch White 
has at last released the pin 
move his B, But . , , 

27 ... . 

28 QxB 

29 P-KKt3 

30 QxP .... 

What's this? — what happened to the in- 
tended 30 Kt-K4 , . , ? Too late he sees that 
Black has the satisfactory reply 30 . . . Q-K3U 
31 Q-Q4 (or 31 QxQ, FxQ winning the B), P- 
KB 41 32 Kt-Ba, Q-K7; 33 R-B2; Q-Kftch; 34 
K-K12, PxB ; or 33 R-KKtl, Q-BGch; 31 R-Kt2, 
Q-BSch etc. It all adds up neatly like an 


and is able to 

BxB 

P-Kt4 

Q~Kt5 


arithmetic problem for 

tots. 


30 .... 

PxB 

34 K-Kt2 

QxQch 

31 RxP 

Q-K3 

35 KtxQ 

R-K7ch 

32 Q-B3 

P-B4 

36 R-B2 

RxRch 

33 Q-Q5 

QR-K1 

37 KxR 

K-B2 

As Black 

needs only 

a draw to hold the title, 

he lias little to fear from this ending. 

White 

will eventually secure 

two passed Ps 

on the 

Q side, but 

Black, by 

keeping his K near the 

Ps and posting his It on the 7th and 8th 

ranks, 

will draw easily. 



38 P-B4 

P-QR4 

51 Kt-B3c h 

K-B3 

39 P-Kt3 

R-K1 

52 Kt-K2 

R-Kt5 

40 P-QR3 

R-QB1 

53 K-B3 

K-Q4 

41 Kt*B3 

K-K3 

54 KLB4ch 

K-B3 

42 K-K3 

K-K4 

55 K B4 

RxP 

43 K-Q3 

R^QKtt 

56 P-Kt5ch 

K Q2 

44 Kt-Kt5 

R-Qlch 

57 K-Q5 

R-KtS 

45 K-B2 

P-R4 

58 KLQ3 

R.Q8 

46 P-QKt4 

PxP 

59 K-B4 

R-QKt8 

47 PxP 

P-R5 

60 Kt-B4 

R-Kt7 

48 P-B5 

PxP 

61 Kt-Q5 

R-Kt8 

49 PxP 

K-Q4 

62 Kt-Kf6th 

KB2 

50 K-Q3 

R-KKtl 

Drawn 



While the above notes make no pretension 
io completeness or absolute accuracy, they 
doubtless have a lew revelations for those 


A cross-section of the “gallery." At the extreme 
right we have (reading from left to right) DR. 

TIM M E, FRANK MARSHALL and CHARLES 

JAFFE. 


(Vine's feverish at tempi to seize the initia- 
tive in a characterless position against so solid 
and experienced a player as Kupcbik, reminds 
one of General Rj ley's immortal words to the 
Missouri House of Representatives in 1861; 

'No sir! Yon might as well try to stuff hot- 
ter in a wildcat with a hot awl.' ) 


SICILIAN DEFENSE 


(Notes by Fred Re inf eld) 


A. Kupchtk 

White 


R. Fine 

Black 


1 P-K4 P-QB4 4 KtxP Kt-B3 

2 Kt-KB3 K1-QB3 5 Kt-QB3 P~K3 

3 P-Q4 PxP 6 B-K3 B,Kt5 

A favorite continuation with Fine; although 
his good results with this variation are based 

on his skill rather than on any particular 

merit of the variation, 

7 KtxKt KtPxKt 


i . , . QPxKt; ft QxQch, KxQ is good enough 
for equality, but Fine won a game with this 
line from Kupchik in last year’s Manhattan- 
Marshall match; hence he doubtless feels that 
the pitcher oughtn’t to go to the well again. 

8 P-K5 Kt-Q4 

9 B-Q2 P_Q3 

More solid than capturing the Kt, which 
would leave Pawn weaknesses in both camps. 

10 KtxKt BxBch 13 B-Q3 OO 

11 QxB KPxKt 14 0-0 P-QB4 

12 PxP QxP 15 KR-K1 B-K3 

The position is about even. Black might 

be thought to have a shade the better of it 

because of his more compact center Ps, but 
Kupchik easily neutralizes whatever danger 
there may be. 


16 P-QKt3 

White’s main concern is of course to lire* 
vent his opponent from safely advancing his 
QP and QBP to the fifth rank, which would 
give Black excellent, prospects. 




80 


The Chess R e v i e w 


16 ... . KR-Q1 

17 QR'QI QR-Ktl 

18 R K3! 

Aha! White realizes that despite the pau- 
city ol' remaining material, he has good coun- 
ter play in menacing his opponent’s rather bare 
K side. 

IS ... . P-Kt3 

Something of the sort is unavoidable, as 
White intends R-Kt3 followed by Q-Rti or 
Q-KtS. 

19 B-B1 Q-Kt3 22 G-R6[ P-R5 

20 QR-K1 P-B5 23 PxBP . PxP 

21 R-K5 P-QR4 24 P-R4! R-Q3? 

Fine had already used up most of his time, 
and it is no wonder that he gets flustered 
as he sees the danger signals. Best seems 
24 . . . Q-Q3; 25 P-R5, QTH with about equal 
chances. The faulty text unleashes wildcat 
Kupchik ! 


Fine 



Kupchik 


25 BxPI R-KB1 

If 25 . . . BxB; 26 R-K8ch and mate follows, 

26 P-R5! B-Q2 

if 26 . . . BxB; 27 R-K8 still forces mate, in 
any event., Black is helpless against the threat- 
ened PxP followed by BxB. 

27 BxPch! Resigns 

There is a quick mate whichever way the 
B is captured, for instance 27 . . . RxB; R- 
KS-ch etc. As Fine resigned, he said ruefully, 
“This is what conies of trying to win a draw 
position/' 


( A tragedy worthy of Shakespeare!) 

BISHOP'S OPENING 

(Notes by Fred Reinfeld) 


W. W. Adams 

White 

1 P-K4 

2 B-B4 

3 P 03 

The alternative 


is 


A. C. Simonson 
Black 

P-K4 

Kt-KB3 

P-B3 

Kt-B3 or . , 


, . B-E 1 

leading into a kind of King's Gambit Declined, 
as in M ol ..t- Smith— Blum in in this issue. The 
more ambitious text, aiming at a Pawn center, 
is doubtless best met by White's following 
counter thrust 


A Study in the Gentle Art of Kibitzing 



SIMONSON ponders while TENNER looks on 



SIMONSON has made his move, which does 
not seem to arouse TENNER'S whole-hearted 
approval. 

The above delightful studies were made by 
Henry Chandler. Our remaining pictures from 
the tournament were taken by Raoul Echev- 
erria. 


4 P-B4 P-Q4 

5 KPxPl .... 

A surprising move, and a surprisingly good 
one. 

5 . , . . P K5?l 

Likewise a surprising reply, turning the 
game inlo a kind of Falkbeer Counter. If 
now 6 Px BP. KtxP leaving White with a very 
difficult position. 

6 PxKP KtxP 

7 Kt-K B3 B-QB4 

8 QKt-Q21 8^64 

Neither S . . , Kt E7; 9 Q-K2ch nor K , , . 
B-B7eh; 9 K-BI need be feared by White, 
And since H , , , PxP is convincingly answered 
by 9 KtxKt, the text is in order. 

9 Q-K2 

The acceptance ol the Pawn sacrifice by 
9 PxP, KtxP; 10 Q-K2, Q-K2; 11 KtxKt, BxKt; 
12 P-B3, 0-0-0 is unclear, but White's game 
would be uncomfortable. Adams characteris- 
tically prefers to play for the initiative. 

9 . . . . PxP 

10 KtxKt BxKt 

If 10 . . . PxKt ; 11 Kt-K5, OO; 12 B-Q2 
intending 0-0-0 and P-KK14, 

11 B-K3! 


BxKt 




May, t 9 4 0 


81 


Or 11 . . . BxB ; 12 QxB, 0 0; 13 0 0-0 and 
White has the better game. 

12 PxB 0-0 

But not 12 . . . Q-RSch?? 13 BB2ch, Q-K2; 
11 BxR winning a piece. 

13 O-O-Q 

Retaining the adva.nta.ge, which would shift 
to Black after 13 BxB, R-Kl; 14 B-K3 k PxB 
etc, 

13 , , , , P-Q5 

14 P-B3 Kt-83 

15 PxP B-Q3 

Recapturing would cost Black at least a 
P after 15 . . . BxP; 16 BxB, KtxB; 17 Q-K1, 
Q-B2; IS RxKt, P-QKM; 19 K-Ktl etc. 

16 K-Ktl Q-B3 

17 P-Q5 Kt-Kt5 

18 KR-Ktl KR-K1 

Not 18 , * . BxP; .19 B-Q4, Q-B4ch; 20 B-Q3 
and wins, 

19 B-Q4 [ Q-B4ch 

If id . - . RxQ ; 20 BxQ, RxP; 21 BxKIP 
and wins. 

20 B-Q3 QxQP?? 

This should have lust outright. He had 
to play 20 , . . RxQ; 21 RxPch, K-Bl; 22 
BxQ h RxP; although the ending is lost for 
him. 


Simon so n 



Adams 


21 BxPch?? 

AlaM There is a forced male with 21 
RxPch t K-Bl; 22 R-KtSch! KxR; 23 R-Ktlch, 
K-Bl ; 24 B-Kt 7ch ! K-Ktl; 25 R-Htich, K-Bl; 
26 R KtSch! KxR; 27 Q-Kt2ch etc, 

21 , t , , KxB 

22 RxPch K-R3 

White resigns. An intensely interesting 
game, and one so difficult to play {and to an- 
notate:) that, the players should not be criti- 
cized too harshly for what might have been. 


PLAINT 

Sadly writes chess columnist Manney of 
Tucson: 'We notice entirely too many chess 

players spending time on bowling, which might 
much more advantageously be diverted to 
chess.’ Alas, too true. 



CLEVELAND WOMEN'S CHESS CLUB 

Photograph ofa group of Queens who gathered 
for their Anniversary Dinner on March 1 3, 1940. 
Standing: Mrs. Roxy Ann Ostruni, Misses Vi- 
ola Bence, Pauline Papp, Helen Seress, 
Julia Fanchaly 

Seated: Mrs. Catherine Kelly, Mrs. E. Hibner, 
Mrs, Mary Groves, Mrs. Flora Haus- 
chiki* Mrs. Mena Schwartz, Miss 
Esther Papp 

WOMEN IN CHESS 

A. C F< Women's Championship Play-Off— 
Miss N, May Karff of Boston won this with a 
score of 3.^- * 1 /2> Mrs. Mary Bain forfeiting 
her second game to her because of lack of time 
to play it off. This gives Miss Karff the first 
leg on the lovely silver trophy donated by 
Mrs. Helen Cobb. 

U. S. Women's Championship Preliminaries 
— The final standings: Miss Adele Raettig 7)^.- 

1 l /i\ M rs . M at i 1 d a H a rm ath 6 * 2 J / 2 \ M rs. 
Edna Harrison 6^-2^; Miss Elizabeth Wray 
6-3; Mrs. Helen Kashdan .5-4; Mrs, Maud 
Stephens 4^-41^; Miss Celia Fawns 4-5; Mrs. 
Hazel Kelley 2-7; Miss Mildred Peters 2-7; 
Miss Kate Applebaum 1-8. Miss Raettig, Mrs. 
Harmath and Miss Wray are playing in the 
finals. The others who qualified — Mrs, Har- 
rison, Mrs. Stephens and Mrs. Kashdan — were 
unable to play because of business obligations. 

Women s Chess in West Virginia — Recent 
reports from Charleston paint an interesting 
picture of the feminine enthusiasm for chess 
in West Virginia, The state woman champion 
is Mrs. Myrl C. Snyder. She is reported to 
be able to put up a good fight against the best 
local men players. The Charleston Chess Club 
has several other enthusiastic women players: 
Mrs, George Naum and Mrs, A. A. Seletz 
both aid in promoting the dub's sponsoring 
of chess in the city schools, and Miss Jean 
Pippen teaches a chess class in the Thomas 
Jefferson Junior High School In all there 
are no less than eight women active in chess 
in Charleston. We hope to report more about 
these women later, — E*L<W . 




JOHN F. BARRY 

By George Sturgis 


John F, Barry has passed away. The news 
of his death spreads sorrow in the chess 
world and particularly in his native Boston 
where his intimate friends had known he w r as 
in failing health for many months, but were 
unaware that the end was so near. 

Mr. Barry was a man of many accomplish- 
ments. Successful and active in the practice 
of law, he was a member of the Boston Bar 
Association* the Law Society of Massachusetts, 
and was identified with many other organi- 
zations. As a chess player he was widely known 
as one of the strongest in the United States. 
Since 1915 he was chess editor of the Boston 
Transcript . If he had not had so many other 
varied interests in life he might well have 
reached the very pinnacle of fame in the chess 
world. 

But today we remember him most of all for 
his lovable character. He was a man for whom 
one instinctively felt a feeling of confidence. 
He had the happy faculty of inspiring warm 
friendships. Soft spoken of voice, but in a 
way that compelled attention and respect, Mr. 
Barry was ever in great demand as an after- 
dinner speaker. On these occasions his young- 
er listeners never tired of hearing the many 
stories and anecdotes which he used to tell of 
the chess masters of years gone by, and the 
world of chess in which he moved as a young 
man. For many years, Mr. Barry had been 
closely identified with the Boston Chess Club, 
founded in 1857, and he delighted to tell of 
the club s early history, of the famous dinner 
given to Paul Morphy at the Revere House in 
1859 on his return from European triumphs, 
and the guests who gathered there to do him 
honor— Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Rus- 
sell Lowell, Louis Agassiz, Lemuel Shaw, and 
Jared Sparks to mention just a few. Mr, 
Barry used to recall the later players, many 
of whom he numbered among his intimate 
friends — Preston Ware, Franklin K. Young, 
Burille, Snow, Stone, and particularly Harry 
Nelson Pillsbury who was destined to become 
one of the chess immortals. With Pillsbury 
Mr, Barry early formed a friendly chess rivalry, 
and in 1893 they played a match which resulted 
5-4 in favor of Pillsbury with numerous draws. 
Later in 1899, Mr, Barry played and won a 
brilliant exhibition game against Pillsbury, an- 
nouncing a mate in thirteen moves! 

Mr. Barry was an outstanding member of the 
American team which engaged England in a 
series of cable matches, and in these matches 


he was undefeated for many years. In the 
first of these contests* in 1896, young Barry 
was then but 23, but by winning a dramatic 
game from his English opponent he brought 
victory to the United States. Old timers re- 
call that the score was tied and everything 
depended upon the result of Barry's game in 
which he had established a dangerous passed 
pawn. Carefully, square by square, he nursed 
it along. At times this vitally important pawn 
seemed lost, but at last it emerged a queen 
upon the eighth rank, and his opponent re- 
signed the game. From a thousand spectators 
a mighty shout went up which Mr, Barry re- 
called as one of the greatest thrills of his life. 

Yes, our dear friend John F. Barry has 
passed away — but the memory of his kindly, 
genial personality remains with us. 

{If it is not too presumptuous to add a few 
words to Mr. Sturgis' beautiful tribute, I 
should like to recall the first and only oc- 
casion on which I met Mr. Barry — during the 
A. C, 1\ Congress last year. He took keen 
interest in the play, and it was pleasant to 
observe his intense delight when he discovered, 
after a passage of 35 years, that there was a 
book of the Cambridge Springs Tournament, 
Barry was wise in not wanting to (and fortu- 
nate in not having to) devote himself to a 
professional chess career, in view of its slight 
rewards and many privations. There is no 
doubt, however, that he had striking gifts for 
the game, as may be seen from the following 
specimens of his play. Incidentally, since his 
fine showing in the Anglo-American Cable 
Matches has been so much admired, it is ap- 
propriate that his full record in these contests 


be given— 

-F.R.) 


1896 

Barry 1 . . . . 

. .Tinsley 0 

1897 

Barry 1 

, .Lawrence 0 

1898 

Barry 1 

, .Caro 0 

1899 

Barry 1 . . . . 

, . Lawrence 0 

1900 

Barry 1 .... 

, . Atkins 0 

1901 

Barry y 2 . . . . 

■ Lee Vz 

1902 

Barry y 2 ■■■ 

. . Mason y 2 

1903 

Barry 1 . , . . 

. . Blackburne 0 

1907 

Barry 0 

. , Atkins 1 

1909 

Barry y 2 - ■ ■ ■ 

. . Lawrence y 2 

1910 

Barry 0 

. . Atkins 1 

1911 

Barry 0 

, .Wahltuch 1 

Surely 

a superb record, 

exceeded only by 


the fine play of A. B. Hodges in the matches. 
The falling off toward the end is attributable to 
lack of practice. 


82 


May, 19 4 0 


R-Ktl 


83 


(T his game is typical of the way in which 
Barry smashed his opponents in the early cable 
matches.) 

Anglo-American Cable Match 1900 
SICILIAN DEFENSE 


J, F. Barry 


H, E, Atkins 


(TJ.S.A.) 


(Great Britain) 


White 


Black 


1 P-K4 

P-QB4 

18 Q-K2 

Kt-B3 

2 P-Q4 

PxP 

19 QR-Q1 

P-K R3 

3 Kt*KB3 

P-K3 

20 P-Kt3 

P-K5 

4 KtxP 

Kt-KB3 

21 Kt-R4 

P-K Kt4 

5 B-Q3 

Kt-B3 

22 B-B3 

Kt-Q4 

6 B-K3 

P-Q4 

23 B-QR1 

P-Kt5 

7 PxP 

KtxP 

24 B*KKt2 

Kt-Kt3 

8 KtxKt 

PxKt 

25 Q-Q2I 

KtxKt 

9 B-Q4 

Q-Kt4 

26 QxB 

Kt-Kt3 

10 0-0 

B-Q3 

27 Q-B5 

Q-Kt3 

11 B-K2 

Q-R3 

28 R-Q6 

R-K3 

12 P-KK13 

P-K4 

29 KR-Q1 

QR-K1 

13 B-QB3 

0-0 

30 RxR 

QxR 

14 B-B3 

B-Kt2 

31 R-Q6 

Q-K2 

15 R-K1 

KR-K1 

32 R-Kt6ch 

K-R2 

16 B-Q2 

Q-K3 

33 QxKBP 

Resigns 

17 Kt-B3 

P-KB4 




Cambridge Springs 1904 



DUTCH 

DEFENSE 



(Notes by I* Chernev) 


Dr, E. 

Lasker 

J. F. Barry 

White 

Black 


1 P-Q4 

P-K3 

4 BxB 

QxB 

2 Kt-KB3 

P-KB4 

5 QKt-Q2 

KLKB3 

3 B-K15 

B-K2 

6 P-K3 

a a 4 ■ 

Lasker as usual has 

not played the 

opening 


any too energetically, and Black already has a 
good game. 


6 , , , . P-QK13 


An excellent idea: Barry anticipates by ten 
years Nimzovich’s theory of the “ideal" Queen's 
Gambit, The B is to control the long diagonal, 
unhampered, as were the old time fianchettoes, 
by a Black P at Q4. 

7 B-K2 B*Kt2 10 P-QKt4 QKt-Q2 

8 0-0 0-0 11 Kt-Kt3 Kt-K5 

9 P-B4 P-Q3L 12 Q-B2 P-KKt4 

Perhaps this should have been held back a 
bit until his development was complete. With 
the three moves , . . QKLB3, . . * QR-Ktl and 
. . . Q-Kl Black would obtain the “ideal” Nim- 
zovich position recommended by “EJze” in the 
British Chess Magazine for 1927, Barry should 
therefore be given credit for playing perhaps 
the first “hypermodern” game on record, 

13 K Kt-Q2 P-K41 

14 P-B3 KtxKt 

15 QxKt QR-K1 

Threatening , , , PxP. 

16 P-Q5 Kt-B3 

17 QR-K1 K-R1 

Black’s plan is clear: the heavy pieces are 
to be massed on the KKt file, with an eventual 
break-through with , , * P-R5. However, this 
move at once, as Barry pointed out after the 
game, was even stronger, 

Id B-Q3 


19 B-B2 

20 P-B4 


* 


4 


Risky in appearance, as it permits a passed 
P, but it is the only means of forestalling . . * 
P-B5, and has the additional merit of creating 
a strong square lor the Kt at Q4. 


20 . . . . 

21 PxP 

22 R-K2 

23 B-Q1 

24 K-R1 

25 P-Kt3 


KtPxP 
P-K 5 
R-Kt3 
R (l)-Ktl 
Q-Kt2 
P-Kt4 


While this is commendable, insofar as bring- 
ing the B into play via Kt2 is concerned, It 
is a deviation from his original plan. Now that 
the heavy pieces are on the Kt file, the break 
can be brought about by , . , P-KR4. 

26 PxP B-Kt2 

27 Kt-Q4 P-K6J 


White threatened 28 Kt-BG or KtxP. 


28 RxP KtxP 

29 R(3)-KB3 KLK2 

30 K-Ktl BxR 

31 BxB P-KR4 

32 R-K1 


If 32 BxP, RxPch! 


32 ... . P-R5 

33 Kt-K6 Q-B3 

34 Kt-Kt5 PxP 

35 PxP RxKt 


Probably best, as the Kt is too strongly 
posted for comfort. White threatened some 
such continuation as 36 Q-R2ch, K-Kt2; 37 Q- 
RTch, K-Bl; 38 Kt-K6ch, K-Kl; 39 B-B6ch, 
KtxB; 40 PxKt best, RxPch; 41 K-Rl, =R-R1; 
42 Kt-Kt7 dbl ch, K-B2; 43 QxR and now Black 
cannot capture the Kt because of mate by 
Q-KSch etc,, while if 43 . , , RrKtS; 44 Q- 
KSch, KxKt; 45 R-K7chj K-R3; 36 R*K6 and 
wins. 


36 PxR RxP 

37 K-B2 R»Kt2 

38 R-Rleh R-R2 

39 RxRch KxR 


40 Q-K3 Kt-BI 

41 Q-Bt Q-Q5ch 

42 K-Kt2 Q-Kt3 

43 Q-Kt5 


Being pressed for time, Lasker was unable 
to calculate the possibilities arising from 43 
P-R4! The text looked attractive because of 
the resulting passed P, but Barry extricates 
himself very cleverly. 

43 ... . QxP 

44 P-Kt4 Q-K4 

45 PxP . . , 


Threatening to win with 46 Q-KtGch, K-Rl; 
47 P-B6* Q-KtTch; 48 K-R3. 

45 ... . Kt-K2 

46 B-Kt4 Kt-Q4I 


With this pretty coup in mind: 47 . . . Kt- 
B5ch; 48 K-B3, Q-K7ch; 49 K-Kt3, Q-Kt7ch; 
50 K-R4, Q-B7 mate! — or 47 , . . Kt-B5ch; 
48 K-Bl, Q-RScli! 49 K-B2, Q-Kt7ch; 50 K-Bl, 
Q-B8ch; SI K-B'2, Kt-Q6ch winning the Q. 


B-B1 


(see diagram next page) 


84 


The Chess Review 


Barry 



Dr- Lasker 


47 Q-B1 Q-K5ch 

48 K-Kt3 Q-K6ch 

49 QxQ KtxQ 

50 K-B3 Drawn 

Black Las the advantage now, but the mas- 
ters at Cambridge Springs were unable to 
demonstrate a win, A fine fighting game, de- 
spite occasional lapses on the part of both 
players, 

(Quoted from the Tournament Book) 


EASTERN INTERCOLLEGIATE CHESS 

ASSOCIATION 

This year’s tide was annexed by CCN.Y. 
{Wi^Yz)* w h° nosed out the favorites 
(Brooklyn College, 9-3) in an exciting finish. 
The following interesting game was of deci- 
sive Importance. 


CARO -KAN N DEFENSE 


H. Seidman 

M. Finkelstein 

(Brooklyn College) 

(C.C.N.Y.) 

White 


Black 


1 P-K4 

P-QB3 

25 R-QB1 

PxBch 

2 P-Q4 

P-Q4 

26 RxP 

B-Kt3 

3 PxP 

PxP 

27 R-B8ch 

K“K2 

4 P-QB4 

Kt-KB3 

28 R-QKt8 

R-Q4 

5 Kt-QB3 

Kt-B3 

29 Kt-Kt4 

R-QB4 

6 B-Kt5 

QKt3 

30 R-Kt7ch 

K-K3 

7 PxP 

QKtxP 

31 Kt-Q3 

R-B2 

8 B-K3 

P-K4 

32 R-Kt8 

K-K2 

9 PxP e*p. 

B-QB4 

33 P-QR4 

B-Kt8 

10 G-R4ch 

K-K2 

34 Kt-Kt4 

BxP 

11 0-0-0 

H-Q1 

35 Kt-R6 

R-B3 

12 B*GB4 

BxP 

36 R-Kt7ch 

Kt-Q2 

13 Kt-R3 

B-Q2 

37 Kt-Kt4 

R-K3 

14 BxKt 

BxQ 

38 RxP 

BxP 

15 KtxB 

BxB 

39 P-R5 

P-R4 

15 KtxQ 

BxKt 

40 P-R6 

K-Q3 

17 KR-KIch 

K-B1 

41 K-B4 

P-R5 

18 P-B3 

P-KR3 

42 R-Kt7 

R-K1 

19 K-B2 

RxR 

43 P-R7 

R-QR1 

20 RxR 

ft-BI 

44 Kt-R6 

B-B7 

21 K-Kt3 

R-B4 

45 Kt-B7 

K-B3 

22 Kt-B4 

B-B2 

46 KtxR 

KxR 

23 Kt-Q3 

R-KKt4 

47 KtrBJ 

KxKt 

24 P-Kt3 

P-Kt4 

Resigns 



Book Reviews 

AMONG THESE MATES 
By CHIE LAM ANGUS $.75 

Chess books, no matter how great their 
merits, are apt to be portentous works which 
require serious application offering no humor, 
ous relief. The above publication is a happy 
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ers for his sprightly and delightfully breezy 
style. The fifteen sketches, illustrated by a 
large number of appropriate pen and ink draw- 
ings, are guaranteed to draw a steady stream of 
guffaw r s and chuckles from every reader, a wel- 
come boon in these sad days. A must book for 
every chess player; it won't make him a mas- 
ter, but it will give him keen pleasure on every 
page. 


HOW TO PLAY CHESS ENDINGS 
By E. A, Znosko-B grows kv $4.00 

The outstanding point of difference between 
the fairly good player and the master is the 
latter's vastly superior understanding and skill 
in the department of endgame play. The well- 
known chess pedagogue, who has produced 
notable works on many aspects of the game, 
has at last written a definitive work on end- 
game play which will not only prove an en- 
lightening introduction to the inexperienced 
player, but will also help to bring about con- 
siderable improvement in the endgame tech- 
nique of the average player. The book has 
146 diagrams, over 200 illustrative examples 
and quite a few problems to be worked out 
by the reader. 


Bound Volumes 
of 

The Chess Review for 1939 

are now available 

Features include:— 

* More than 225 picked games 

• 297 selected problems 

• Accounts of notable tournaments 

* Important innovations in opening 
play 

* Articles of general interest 

• Cartoons and photographs 

Price: $3.50 

The Chess Review 

25 West 43rd St. New York City 


The Manhattan - Marshall Match 


In accordance with immemorial tradition, the 
championship of the Metropolitan Chess Lea- 
gue was once more decided in the last round 
by the outcome of the match between the Man- 
hattan Chess Club and the defending cham- 
pions, the Marshall Chess Club, The latter 
suffered from the absence of Edward Lasker, 
who was out of town on a business trip, and 
of Bernstein, Reinfeld, Seidman and Ulvestad, 
who were all participating in the U, S. Cham- 
pionship Preliminaries. This circumstance 
serves to explain the rather one-sided victory 
of the Manhattans by 12-6, 

However, what might have happened will 
have to remain forever in the realm of imagi- 
nation, and the Manhattan team deserves high 
praise for its determination and successful play. 
The details follow, 

Manhattan C. C, 

1. A, S. Denker y z 

2* A, C. Simonson, . 1 

3. 1. Kashdan.,, / z 

4. J. Moskowitz 0 

5. A. Kupchik. 1 

6. F. Nadell y 2 

7 . G, Shainswit, y 2 

8. Dr. G, Plati 1 

9. A. S, Pinkus 1 

10. B. Blumin 0 

11. R, Willman 1 

12. L. Greene„ _ 0 

13. J. Soudakoff ~-/ z 

14. O, Termer..^.**..* 1 

15. E. Fuchs... 1 

16. L* Halpern 1 

17. 1. Heitor 1 

IS. J, Dutka J/ 2 


12 


Marshall C. C. 


M. Hanauer y 2 

D. Pol land __ 0 

F. J. Marshall. [ / 2 

R. Fine— .... 1 

S. Reshevsky 0 

A* E, Santasiere_-J/ 2 

M. Green y 2 

A. Kreymborg.... 0 

R* Smirka.... 0 

K. O. Mott-Smith_ 1 

D. A. Hallman.. 0 

B. Forsberg.^ „ 1 

J. W. Collins Z z 

K. Darby 0 

T. Dunst **.*._ 0 

E. B. Adams 0 

J. S. Battel i 0 

J. Donovan y 2 


6 


Before the final match the Marshall team led 
by the margin of half a point in match results. 
Hence the Manhattans had to win the match to 
win the title, whereas the Marshalls needed 


only a draw for the 

same result. 

The final 

standings: 

Matches 

Games 


W L 

W L 

1. Manhattan . , . . 

- • 6i/ 2 - i/ 2 

53 -25 

2. Marshall 

. .6 -1 

55 -23 

3.-4. Bronx 

• 51 / 2 - 21/2 

441/2*35^ 

3.-4* Steinitz ....... 

-- 51 / 2 - 21/2 

44 .36 

5. Queens . 

- 21 / 2 - 41/2 

29 -4 1 

6.-7. West Side 

■ - 11 / 2 - 51/2 

3H/2-44i/ 2 

6.-7. City College . , . 

- 11 / 2 - 51/2 

27l/ 2 -481/ 2 

8. North Jersey . . 

. .1 -3 

141/2-251/2 

9- Empire City . . . 

. .1 -6 

25 -45 


( Matt-Smith is as formidable as bis initials!) 

BISHOP'S OPENING 

(Notes by K, O. Mott-Smith) 

K, O. Mott-Smith B. Blumin 

(Marshall C. CO (Manhattan C. CO 

White Black 


1 P-K4 

2 B- B4 


P-K4 


* * # * 


The late John F. Barry of Boston in the 
1920's imparted his enthusiasm for this move 
to a group of young disciples, among whom 
were W* W. Adams and myself* While not 
concurring in Adams’ view that this opening, 
and none other, confers a winning advantage 
with the move, ! am inclined to believe it at 
least as strong as 2 Kt-KB3! It is, however, a 
hair trigger opening, wherein one weak move by 
White may easily lead to quick disaster. How 
much simpler for the first player to wallow 
in the comfortable security of the Queen's 
Gambit, playing the first dozen moves rapidly 
and even carelessly, if he so desires, without 
necessarily jeopardizing a possible draw! 

2 , . . . Kt-KB3 

$ P-Q3 B-B4 

4 Kt-QB3 P-Q3 

5 P-B4 PxP 

Doubtful; but last year Blumin got into 
trouble against Adams through permitting the 
further advance P-B5. Simple and sound is 
B-K3 at once. 


6 BxP 

7 Kt-B3 

8 B-Q Kt5 

Threatening P-QLQ5. 

3 . . . . 

9 P-Q4 
10 0-0 
11 B-Kt5 


Kt-B3 

B-K3 


B-Q 2 
B-Kt3 
0-0 
* i i < 


Now the pin is very strong and gives White 
a decided edge* 

11 ... . B-Kt5 

12 BxQKt PxB 

13 Q-Q3 P-KR3 

14 B-R4 

Not 14 BxKt, QxB; 15 K1-K5, QxKt 

14 , * , , Q- K2 

15 K-R1 Q-K3 

He cannot prevent the continuation which 
follows, , . * F-K14 being met, obviously, by 
KtxP, 

16 BxKt QxB 

17 Kt-KS Q-K3 

18 KtxQBP .... 

White has not only won a Pawn but threat* 
ens to bring the other Kt into immediate action 
by Kt-Q5. In his anxiety to forestall this 
move. Black gets into worse trouble. 


18 . . . 
19 PxP 


P-B4 

Q-Q2 


Perceiving too late that the Pawn is immune 


85 


86 


The Chess Review 


from capture because of Kt-KTch after the 
ensuing exchanges. 

20 Q-K4 

Best. Kt-Q5 .instead would simply lead to 
unnecessary trouble after the reply 20 . . * 
QR-K1, 

20 . . . . QR-K1 

21 QxB QxKt 

22 P-B6 

It looks like an easy win for White, but. 
Black puts up a desperate struggle and ac- 
tually comes within an ace of turning the 
tables, 

22 ... . R-B2 

23 R-B5 .... 

Selected in preference to R-B3 in order to 
threaten Kt-Q5 and to avoid the possible ex- 
change of Queens by Q-Q2. 

23 ... . K-R2 

24 R ( R ) - K B 1 P-Kt3 

25 R(B5)-B3 . . . . 

Simpler was R(5)-E4 > nipping any counter- 
attack in the bud. The advance of the K side 
Pawns would then win almost automatically. 


Blumin 



JVIott-Smith 

25 ... . P Q4 

Or 25 . . . Q-B5; 26 Kt-K4, 

! . 26 , . . BxP, and now not 27 P-R3, Q-K3, 

nor even 27 Q-B4 (threatening 28 QxFoh), R- 

K4 f hut simply 27 Kt-Q2 winning the Bishop 
e. g. } 27 . . . Q-Q4; 28 R-Q3, P-B4 ; 2-9 P-B-3 ; or 

27 . , . Q-Kt5 ; 28 R-KKtS, followed bv P-B3, 

II. 2ft . . , QxQP; 27 Kt-Kt5 (ch) , PxKt; 23 
QxP and wins since the threat of R J R3ch can- 
not be parried e.g, T 28 , * , R“K6; 29 R-B4, 
R-K5; 30 QT14 ch etc, 

26 P-KR4 P-KR4 


27 G-Kt5 

Inviting the complications which follow. 

27 , „ , . BxP 

23 KtxP R-K4 

29 Kt-K7I ! QxQBP 

The move anticipated, and no worse, as a 
matter of fact, than any other. If 29 . . . 
Rx.Q; 30 KtxQ, R-Kt5 ; 31 P-KKt3 with an 
easily won ending since BxKtP is impossible in 
view of Kt-QS followed hy -the advance of the 
KBP, Or if 29 . . . KRxKt; 30 PxR f Rx.Q; 31 
PxR r Q-K5; .32 R(B3)-B4, Q-K6 ; 33 R-B8, Qx 
KtP; 34 R(B1)-B4 and wins. Or, in this 33 
, . . QK5 ; 34 R(E1)-B7(ch), B-Kt2; 35 P-K8 
(Q) and wins. 

30 R-B5 ! .... 


Decisive. In view of the threat of QxKtP 
(ch) followed by mate, Black's reply is forced. 

30 ... . R ( B2) x Kt 

31 PxR RxR 

32 QxR PxQ 

33 P-KS(Q) Q-K5 

34 QxP(ch), and wins 

Black played on for several moves, but might 
as well have resigned here. 


FRENCH DEFENSE 

(Notes hy Fred Rein-feld) 


A. S. Pinkus 

(Manhattan C.C.) 
White 

1 P-K4 P-K3 

2 P-Q4 P-Q4 

3 Kt-QB3 KhKBS 


R. Smirka 
(Marshall C.C,) 
Black 

4 B-Kt5 B-K2 

5 P-K5 KKt-Q2 

6 P-KR4 P-QB4 


This is generally conceded to be Inferior. 
Best (if you have an excellent memory!) seems 
6 . > , P-KB3! 7 B-Q3, P-QB4 and Black gets 
the better of it (as of May 221). 


7 BxBi 


KxB 


Black's K is now destined to have an uneasy 
existence, but as Kashdan has shown, the sacri- 
ficial line 7 . * . QxB; 8 Kt-Kt5, O-O?! 9 Kt- 
B7, PxP; 10 KtxR, P“B3 ; 11 Kt-BT, PxP; 12 
Kt-Kt5, P-QR3 is convincingly met by 13 Kt- 
R7 ! 

8 P B4 Kt-QB3 

9 PxP Q-R4 

Also good for White is 9 . . . KtxBP; 10 
Q-Kt4, K-B1 ; 11 O-O-O, B-Q2; 12 Kt-B3, R-B1 ; 
13 RT13, P-KR4 ; 14 R-R3 (RyumimStah.Iberg, 
Moscow 1935) with a very promising position, 

10 Q-Q2 QxB P 

11 Kt-B3 P-QR3 

12 0-0-0 P-Q Kt4 


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May, 1940 


87 


As the sequel Indicates, this natural-looking 
move is inferior to 12 . * . KL-K13. 

13 P~B5t P-R3 


14 0- B4 B.Kt2 

15 B-Q3 QR-B1 

16 KR-K1 Kt-Kt5 


Alarmed by the rapid concentration of hostile 
forces against his K, Black tries to simplify. 
But it is too late. 

17 Kt-Q4I KtxBch 

IS RxKt P-Kt5 

19 PxP! PxP 

Of coarse if 19 . * , PxKt; 20 QxPch and 
mate next move. 

20 Q-Kt41 KR-K1 

If 20 . * . PxKt; 21 QxKtPch wins. 

21 KtxP I Q-Kt3 

22 QxPch KxKt 

23 R-Kt3 Resigns 

Another snappy addition to the many bril- 
liant wins chalked up with this variation. 


THREE KNIGHTS GAME 


A. Kupchik S. Reshevsky 


(Manhattan C.G.) 

(Marshall 

C.C.) 


White 



Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

22 

KR-K1 

QR-K1 

2 

KLKB3 

Kt-QB3 

23 

P-KB4 

K-B1 

3 

Kt-B3 

B-Kt5 

24 

P-B4 

R-Q1 

4 

B-B4 

Kt-B3 

25 

P-B5 

Kt-Q4 

5 

P-Q3 

P-Q4 

26 

BxKt 

RxB 

8 

PxP 

KtxP 

27 

P-B6 

PxP 

7 

B-Q2 

BxKt 

28 

Q-R3 

Q-Q3 

8 

PxB 

B-Kt5 

29 

QxP 

P-B3 

9 

P-KR3 

B-R4 

30 

Kt-B4 

Q-Q2 

10 

Q-K2 

0-0 

31 

Kt-K3 

Q-K1 

11 

Q-K4 

Kt-Kt3 

32 

K-B2 

R-Kt4 

12 

B-Kt3 

B-Kt3 

33 

Q-R3 

B-K5 

13 

Q-KKt4 

P-K5 

34 

R-K2 

P-Kt3 

14 

PxP 

BxP 

35 

Kt-Kt4 

K-Kt2 

15 

B-K3 

B-Kt3 

36 

R (Q1)*K1 

P-R4 

16 

0-0 

R~K1 

37 

Kt-K3 

R-K3 

17 

QR-Q1 

Q-B3 

38 

Kt-QI 

Q-Q2? 

i e 

B-Q4 

KtxB 

39 

RxB 

RxR 

19 

PxKt 

R-K5 

40 

RxR 

Q-B4 

20 

Q-Kt3 

R-K2 

41 

Q-K7ch 

Resigns 

21 

Kt-K5 

B-B4 






RUY 

LOPEZ 



R* Fine 


J* Moskowiti 


(Marshall C.C.) 

(Manhattan 

C.C.) 


White 



Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

19 

BxRP 

QxBP 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

20 

KR-QB1 

Q-Kt7 

3 

B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

21 

P-Kt4 

B-Kt3 

4 

B-R4 

Kt-B3 

22 

QR-Ktl 

Q-R6 

5 

0-0 

B-K2 

23 

B-Kt5 

P-R3 

6 

Q-K2 

P-Q Kt4 

24 

B-R4 

RxKt 

7 

B-Kt3 

P-Q3 

25 

KtxR 

QxKRP 

8 

P-QR4 

B-Kt5 

26 

BxKt 

BxB 

9 

P-B3 

0-0 

27 

RxP 

B-Kt4 

10 

P-KR3 

B-R4 

28 

R-Q5 

B-B5 

11 

R-Q1 

Kt-QR4 

29 

Kt-BI 

P-R4 

12 

B-B2 

Q-Ktl 

30 

B-Q7 

PxP 

13 

P*Q4 

P-B4 

31 

BxP 

Q-R5 

14 

PxKP 

QPxP 

32 

R-B5 

R-Q1 

15 

B-Kt5 

P-Kt5 

33 

RxKt 

R-Q7 

16 

QKt-Q2 

PxP 

34 

R-R8ch 

K-R2 

17 

PxP 

Q-Kt7 

35 

R (1 )-Kt8 

BxP 

18 

B-Q3 

KR-Q1 

36 

QxBch 

Resigns 


Other Met League Games 


CARO-KANN DEFENSE 


(Notes by Fred Reinfeld) 


B. Sobln 

(Bronx GO.) 

White 

1 P-K4 P-QB3 

2 P-Q4 P-Q4 

3 KLQB3 PxP 

4 KtxP B-B4 


A, E. Santasiere 
(Marshall C.C.) 

Black 

5 Kt-Kt3 B-Kt3 

6 Kt-B3 Kt-Q2 

7 B-Q3 KKt-BS 

8 0-0 , , . , 


Lifeless. Much more promising is 8 P-KR4, 
BxB; 9 QxB followed by B-Q2 and 0-0-0 with 
much the same kind of play as in the game 
Fine-Hanauer in the previous issue. 

S . . . . P-K3 

9 P"Kt3? 


This turns out poorly. The Q fianchetto is 
rarely in order in KP openings. 

9 ■ . . . B-Q3 

10 P-B4 Q-B2 

11 R-K1 0-0-0 

. . . 0-0 is good enough for equality; but 
Santasiere prefers {characteristically) to give 
the positional stew the additional spice of 
tactical complications. 

12 Kt-BI 

B-Kt2 was relatively better* 

12 ... . P-K4I 

Opening up the game to his advantage. 
White's attempted refutation fails to jell. 

13 P*B5 P-K5 

14 PxB QxP 

15 B*K2 PxKt 

16 BxP Kt-Kt3 


A sly fellow, this Santasiere! After the 
threatening gesture of * * * 0-0-0, he suddenly 
settles down to the familiar siege of the iso- 
lated QP. 

17 B-K3 QKLQ4 

18 Kt-Q2 KR-K1 

19 Kt-B4 Q-B2 

20 Kt-K5 


Allowing Black to win a P by a profound 
maneuver. 

20 , RxKt! 

21 PxR KtxB 

22 Q-B1 Kt-B7 

And not %% . . * Kt(6)-Kt5 (seemingly saving 
all his booty) because of Q-Kt5 ! and he must 
part with a Kt. 


23 PxKt PxP 

24 R-K2 KtxR 

25 QxKt Q-Q3 


Black must now win in due course, not only 
because of the extra P on the Q side, but be- 
cause oi: his powerful centralization, which 
condemns White to thumb-twiddling. 


26 

R-K1 

Q-Q5 

27 

Q-B1 

Q-Q7 

28 

Q-R1 

R.Q6 

29 

R-QB1 

K-B2 

30 

R-B5 

B-K5J 


Taking advantage of White's desertion of 
the first rank. Watch the big troubles from 
little acorns grow. 

31 B-R5 P-Kt3! 


88 


The Chess Review 


32 R-B1 0-Kt4 

33 P-B3 R-Q7 

The storm breaks* 

34 B-Kt4 Q- K 6c h 

35 K-R1 RxRPl 

White resigns, A nice game by Santasiere, 
and doubly welcome after his recent doldrums. 


\ 

SICILIAN 

DEFENSE 


A. Kupchik 

J. Partos 

(Manhattan C.C.) 

(Queens C.C,} 

White 

Black 


1 P-QB4 

P-QB4 

13 Kt-B5 

BxKt 

2 Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

14 B-Kt6 

Q-Q2 

3 P-Q4 

PxP 

15 PxB 

Q-K14 

4 KtxP 

P-KKt3 

16 R-B1 

Kt-KB3 

5 P-K4 

B-Kt2 

17 PxBP 

KtxP 

6 B-K3 

P-Q3 

18 RxKt 

QxR 

7 Kt-QB3 

B-Q2 

19 BxQ 

RxB 

8 B-K2 

P-QR3 

20 Q-K2 

KtxKt 

9 0-0 

QR-B1 

21 QxR 

KtxB 

10 P-KR3 

Kt-R4 

22 Q-B6ch 

Kt-Q2 

11 P-QKt3 

P-Q Kt4 

23 Q-B8 male 


12 Kt-Q5 

PxP 




QUEEN'S PAWN OPENING 


H. Fajans 

(Steinitz CXI) 

White 


D. Levine 

(City College) 

Black 


1 P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

10 KtxP 

KtxKt 

2 P-K3 

P-K3 

11 BxKt 

Kt-B3 

3 B-Q3 

P-Q Kt3 

12 Q-R4ch 

Kt-Q2 

4 KLQ2 

B-Kt2 

13 B-B4 

Q-B1 

5 KKt-B3 

P-B4 

14 P-Q 5 

K-K2 

6 0-0 

P-Q4 

15 PxP 

PxP 

7 P-B3 

QKLQ2 

16 QR-Q1 

Kt-B3 

8 R-K1 

Q-B2 

17 BxB 

QxB 

9 P-K4 

QPxP 

18 Kt-Kt5 

Resigns 

NEW 

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of celluloid men has checker sym- 
bols on the reverse side. 

Extra Sets of Chessmen ,50 

Extra Bets of Combination Chess & 

Checkers . .60 

Special 20% discount in quantities of - 

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THE CHESS REVIEW 

25 W. 43rd STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

— 


INDIAN DEFENSE 


R. Willman 


M, Neckermann 


(Manhattan 

GX.) 

(West Side Y. 

M.C.A.) 

White 


Black 


1 Kt-KB3 

Kt-KB3 

17 R-R2 

Q-Q6 

2 P-B4 

P-KKt3 

18 PxP 

RPxP 

3 P-Q4 

B-K12 

1& P-KR4 

KR-B3 

4 K1-B3 

P-Q4 

20 P-R5 

P-K Kt4 

5 B-B4 

0-0 

21 P-R6 

K-R2 

6 PxP 

KtxP 

22 R-R3 

P-Kt5 

7 KtxKt 

QxKt 

23 R-Kt3 

P-B4 

S BxP 

Kt-R3 

24 B-B5 

R-K3ch 

& B-B4 

B-B4 

25 R-K3 

RxRch 

10 P-QR3 

QR-B1 

26 BxR 

P-Kt6 

11 P-K3 

R-B7 

27 RxB 

RxR 

12 BxKt 

Q-R4ch 

28 Q-B3 

RxKt 

13 Kt-Q2 

QxB 

29 PxP 

R-R7 

14 P-K4 

KR-B1 

30 B-B1 

QxQ 

15 PxB 

BxP 

Resigns 


16 B-K3 

BxP 




SICILIAN 

DEFENSE 


G. Heilman 

M. Green 

(Empire City C.C.) 

(Marshall CbC.) 

White 


Black 

1 P K4 

P-QB4 

24 B-B4 

PxP 

2 KLKB3 

P-K3 

25 RxP 

R-R1 

3 P-Q4 

PxP 

26 P-QKt4 

PxP 

4 KtxP 

Kt-KB3 

27 RxR 

RxR 

5 Kt-QB3 

P-Q3 

28 BxP 

Q-Q5 

6 B-K2 

P-QR3 

29 Q-B4ch 

QxQ 

7 P-QR4 

Q-B2 

30 BxQ 

R-R8ch 

8 0-0 

P-QKt3 

31 K-R2 

K-Q3 

9 P*B4 

B-Kt2 

32 K-Kt3 

K-K4 

10 B-B3 

QKt-Q2 

33 R-B2 

K-Q5 

11 K-R1 

P-KR4 

34 B-Kt5 

R-Q8 

12 P-B5 

P-K4 

35 B-B6 

K-K6 

13 KirKtZ 

Kt-B4 

36 P-R4 

R-Q7 

14 KtxKt 

QPxKt 

37 R-B1 

RxP 

15 Kt-Q5 

BxKt 

38 R-KIch 

K-Q5 

16 PxB 

P-K5 

39 B-Kt7 

K-K4 

17 B-K2 

B-Q3 

40 R-QR1 

R-IB6ch 

18 P-R3 

Q-Kt2 

41 K-B2 

Kt-Kt5ch 

19 B-KB4 

BxB 

42 K-B1 

P-Kt6 

20 RxB 

0-0-0 

43 R-R4 

Kt-K6ch 

21 Q-KB1 

QxP 

44 K-K2 

Kt-B5 

22 BxPch 

K-B2 

Resigns 


23 P-R5 

Q-Q3 



U. 

S. Championship 1940 


(A sad day for Pink us, who is 

evidently 

baffled by Denke/s or * 

'ginal play.) 


QUEEN’S GAMBIT DECLINED 

A, S T Denker 

A. S. Pi 

nkus 

White 


Black 

1 P-Q4 

Kt-K B3 

11 K-B1 

Kt-B3 

2 P-QB4 

P-K 3 

12 Kt-Kt5 

P-B4 

3 Kt-GB3 

P-Q4 

13 P-KR4 

Q-K1 

4 Kt-B3 

B-K2 

14 Q-Kt3 

Q-Q2 

6 B-B4 

0-0 

15 R-Q1 

K-R1 

6 P-K 3 

P-B4 

16 B-Kt5 

Q-K2 

7 Q PxP 

BxP 

17 QxP 

R-Q 1 ? 7 

8 PxP 

KtxP 

18 QxRch 

QxQ 

9 KtxKt 

PxKt 

19 Kt-B7ch 

Resigns 

10 B-Q3 

B-Kt5ch 




May, 1940 


89 


LOCAL CHAMPIONSHIPS 

Tlie Massachusetts State Championship has 
been won by Harlow II. Daly with a score of 
ll%-2%- Adams and KaU tied for second and 
third with 11-3; Keller was fourth with 9%- 
4 % and Schapiro (9-5) came fifth. This event 
is a regular feature of the State Chess Associ- 
ation and begins Washington's birthday. This 
year's winner, Daly, finished in a triple tie 
together with Fliegel and Ward in second 
place, a year ago. 

The new Minnesota Champion is Dr. G* A* 
Koelsche of Rochester. 

The championship of Charleston, W. Va. has 
been won by Walter Crede with the fine score 
of 6%-%. Tied for second and third were 
W, Hartling and A. Maloy with 

The District of Columbia Championship has 
concluded with the following scores: 

A, Mengarini _ 5 -1 

H, A. Rousseau 4%-I% 

J. Hoy 4 -2 

S. E* Wa-gman 3 -3 

C. W, Stark 2 -4 

V, Sournin 1%*4% 

E, M. Knapp *. 1 -5 

The new champion, Ariel Mengarini, is only 
twenty years old. 


Minnesota State Championship 1940 

CENTRE COUNTER GAME 
J, Harris ft, M, Dickson 

White Black 


1 P-K4 

P-Q4 

14 B-K13 

Kt-R4 

2 PxP 

QxP 

15 QxP 

KtxB 

3 Kt-QB3 

Q-QR4 

16 PxKt 

KtxKt 

4 Kt-B3 

B-KtS 

17 PxKt 

BxP 

5 P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

18 K-B1 

0-0-0 

6 B-Kt5ch 

P-B3 

19 K-K2 

BxP 

7 B-QS 

P-K3 

20 R-R1 

B-B5 

3 ao 

B-Q3 

21 QR-KBt 

Q-K4ch 

9 P-KR3 

P-KR4 

22 K-Q1 

Q-K6 

10 R-K1 

Q-B2 

23 Kt-Ktl 

RxBch 

11 PxB 

PxP 

24 PxR 

QxPch 

12 Kt*K5 

QKt-Q2 

25 K-K1 

B*Kt6ch 

13 B-KB4 

P-KK14 

Resigns 



TEXAS NOTES 

The rivalry between the Dallas and Fort 
Worth Chess Clubs is so keen that they have 
contested three matches this year, with Dallas 
coming out ahead 2 — L 
J, C* Thompson, who conducts an excellent 
chess column in the Dallas Morning News, re- 
cently gave the biggest exhibition in Texas 
when he took on 41 opponents in his home 
town, with splendid results. The previous re- 
cord had been set by Horowitz, who played 37 
in Fort Worth in 1938* 


ST, LOUIS CHAMPIONSHIP 

The city championship has been won by R. S* 
Scrivener with the splendid score of nine wins, 
no losses and two draws, The leading scores: 
R, S* Scrivener 10 — 1, E. W. Marchand 8% — 
214, M. W, Gilbert and L. W. Haller 8—3, 
C. M. Burton 716—3*4, 

St. Louis players are hoping to arrange short 
wave radio matches with Kansas City and 
Chicago. Their main difficulty at present is to 
find radio operators who are also chess players. 


STOP ME IF (!) YOU'VE HEARD THIS ONE 


From the Fred Alien Show of April 17* 1940: 

Allen: . , . Say, I'm glad you brought up 
the bridge tournament, Harry, I 
was over there Saturday night. The 
finish was really exciting. 

Harry : Was it noisy, Fred? 

Allen: It was bedlam* Harry, Two men who 
were playing chess in the corner 
of the room woke up. 

Harry: It must have been exciting to wake 
up two chess players, Fred. 

Allen: Especially when they're in the mid- 
ale of the game as these two fel- 
lows were. 


Harry: How long had the chess game been 
going on? 

Allen: They must have been playing for a 
long time* There was dust all 
over one man's bishop. And when 
the other fellow woke up he said, 
" Tobacco Road’ T s opening to- 
night. I've got to get over there/' 
Harry: Yes* Some of those chess games 
last for years, 

Ha ha. And ho hum. Speaking of things 
that last long* is there anything older than a 
radio wheeze? 


THE INTERNATIONAL CHESSBOARD 

There is no doubt that General Weygand's 
appointment will give confidence to all the 
armies engaged in the present tremendous 
battle against an enemy who has used such un- 
conventional methods as the invasion of coun- 
tries while their Ambassadors were still in resi- 
dence* Against such methods even the greatest 
generals are at such a disadvantage as a chess 
player would be against an opponent who used 
his knights and bishops as queens." (P, J* 
Philip in The New York Times) 


ADAMS WINS STURGIS CUP 

Boston— Weaver W* Adams has won the 
Sturgis Cup, emblematic of the chess cham- 
pionship of the City of Boston* This coveted 
trophy was placed in competition six years ago. 
Adams won in 1936. 1939 and again in the tour- 
n ament recently closed for 1940. Harlow B. 
Daiy had two legs in the race* having won In 
1935 and 1938. Sydney S, Coggan won in 1937* 

There were fifteen contenders this year and 
among the leaders the competition was close* 
Adams’ score was 12 — 2; Katz 11% — 2%; Sha- 
piro 10%*— 3%: Daly and Fliegel tied at 9 — 5. 

John MacLane of the Boston City Club won 
the general tournament* which was conducted 
simultaneously with the masters* class, by a 
score of 8—0, a very creditable performance. 


90 


The Chess Review 


Keres-Euwe Match 

Match 1939-1940 
(Twelfth Game) 

RETI OPENING 


14 , , , , BxP 

15 Kt-Q4 BxKKt 

After 15 . . , O-O; 16 KtxB, QxKt; 17 Ex 
KtP White has won a P and remains with 
an excellent position, 

15 QxB Q-Kt2? 


(Notes by Dr, M. Euwe) 


P. Keres 
White 

1 Kt-KB3 

2 P-B4 


Dr, M. Euwe 
Black 

P-Q4 

PxP 


One of the simplest continuations at Black ? s 
disposal, inviting White to transpose Into the 
Queen's Gambit Accepted. 2 . . . P-Q5 is more 
aggressive but also more risky; whilst 2 . . . 
P-QB3; 3 P-Q4 leads into the Slav Defense, 

3 P-K3 P-QB4 

4 BxP Kt-KB3 

5 0-0 P-QR3 

But not 5 . . . B-Kt5?? 6 BxPch etc. The 
text prepares for * * . F-QKt4, a maneuver of- 
ten seen in the Queen's Gambit, 

6 P-QKtS .... 

6 P-Q4, P-K3; 7 Q-K2, Kt-B-3 would lead to 
the principal variation of the Queen's Gambit; 
but White has other plans and prefers to head 
into an irregular opening, 

6 . . . . P-QKt4 

The first weak move which soon leads to 
difficulties. This move, which can be very 
strong in the Queen's Gambit, is out of order 
in the present and quite different circum- 
stances. The advanced Ps are soon subjected 
to an attack which proves embarrassing for 
Black. 

Correct was 6 . . . Kt-B.3 and 7 , . . P-K3 
to be followed by normal developing moves. 

7 B-K2 B-Kta 

8 B-Kt2 QKt-Q2 

9 P-QR4I .... 


Exploiting Black's mistake at move six. 

9 . . . , Q-Kt3? 

A second error, which renders Black's game 
almost untenable. The resulting play on the 
Q side is highly disadvantageous for Black be- 
cause of his lack of development; hence * . . 
P-Kl 5 was correct— although White would still 
have the better game because of his occupa- 
tion of QB4, 

10 PxP PxP 

11 RxRch BxR 

12 Kt-R3 B-B3 

If 12 . . . P-Kt5 White occupies QB4 with no 
loss of time. 


13 F-Q4I 


White at last resorts to this important ad- 
vance because he wants to open up the position 
so as to utilize his superior development for a 
telling blow before Black can call up his 
reserves. 

13 ... . P-K3 

14 PxP .... 

Q-Q3 was also possible. Black’s best course 
would then be to abandon the QKtP and com- 
plete his development with . . . B-K2 and . . . 
0-0. The text is even stronger, however, as 
it leaves Black no counterplay at all. 


The final and decisive error, as Black will 
now' be prevented from castling. It is true 
that after 16 . . . QxQ; 17 BxQ the ending 
would be most unfavorable for Black, but he 
could at least hold out for a while, 

17 Q-QKt4I Kt-Q4 

Not 17 , . ♦ BxP; 18 KtxF with the terrible 
menace of Kt-QGch. 

18 Q‘Q6 Kt-K2 

If 18 . * . Q-B2; IS QxQ, KtxQ; 20 R-QB1, 
Kt-Ktl ; 21 KtxP with an easy win. 

19 R-QB1 P-Kt5 

Black has practically no moves left. The 
omission of castling is now brings its own 
punishment, 

20 Kt-B4 Kt-KB4 

21 Q- B4 BxP 


Seemingly a little counte reliance, but White 
squelches it relentlessly. 

22 Kt-Q6ch ! KtxKt 

23 QxKt Resigns 

Black is powerless against the double threat 
of R-B7 and B-Kt5. 

(Translated from the Haags che Courant by 

Jf.B.S.) 


Match 1939-1940 

(Fourth Game) 

RUY LOPEZ 

(Notes by Fred Reinfeld) 

P. Keres Dr. M. Euwe 



White 


Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

10 P-Q4 

o o 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

11 PxP 

PxP 

3 

B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

12 B-Kt5 

B.Kt2 

4 

B-R4 

Kt-B3 

13 Q-K1 

KtxB 

5 

Kt-B3 

B-K2 

14 RPxKt 

P-R3 

6 

0-0 

P-QKt4 

15 BxKt 

QxB 

7 

B-Kt3 

P-Q3 

16 Q-K3 

Q-B3 

8 

KtQ5 

Kt-QR4 

17 KR-K1 

P-B3 

9 

KtxB 

QxKt 

18 P-QKt4 

Q-B5 


From the peaceful play thus far, one would 
think that Keres Is satisfied with a draw, 
especially since the Q file beckons so invitingly 
for a blood-bath of the Rs. But Keres means 
to fight — all the more so since he has lost the 
previous game and hopes to even the score. 
His intention is to exert pressure on Black's 
QRP by eventually bringing his Kt to QB5, 
where it will be very strongly posted. Dr. 
Euwe prepares his counterplay with his usual 
skill, 


19 P-B3 KR-Q1 

20 KDQ2 Q-B2 

21 R-R3 R-Q3 

22 Kt-Kt3 QR-Q1 


23 Kt-B5 B-B1 

24 P-R3 R-Q7 

25 R-K2 R-Q8ch 

26 K-R2 Q-R41 


Black must maintain an active policy. The 
text, for example, threatens , , , BxP In cer- 
tain eventualities, and thus reduces White's 
freedom of action. 


91 


The A* C. F. Yearbook 


May, 1940 


27 P-QK13 

R-GKt8 

37 Q-K3 

R-Q1 

28 K1-Q31 

B-K3 

38 R-R7 

K-B1 

29 R-Q2 

R-Q8 

39 Q-Bl 

Q-Q3 

30 RxP 

RxR 

40 Kt-Kt7 

Q-Q7 

31 QxR 

BxKtP 

41 QxQ 

RxQ 

32 Q-K3 

Q-Q8 

42 R-R8ch 

K-K2 

33 Kt-BS 

B-B5 

43 R-QB8 

RxP 

34 R-R7 

R-QB1 

44 RxPch 

K-B1 

35 Q-Kt3 

Q-Q3 

45 Kt-Q6 

B-Q6 

36 R-R6 

G-K2 

46 K-Kt3 

R-B7 


Tlio exchange of Qs has led to a difficult 
ending in which White appears to have an 
edge because of the possibility of P-R4 in some 
variations. However, Black’s pieces are posted 
very aggressively s and White also has weak- 
nesses. 

47 K-Kt41 ? FtxPch 

43 K-B5 K-Ktl I 

Very cool play —and part of an interesting 
plan which gradually unfolds as a reply to 
White's rash play. 


Dr. Euwe 



Keres 


49 R-B5? .... 

Euwe shows a draw at once with 41) P-E4, 
PxP; 50 P-Kt5 + R-Kt7 ; 51 K-K1;0 ? R-Kl7ch; 52 
K-B5 etc. 

49 ... . P-R41 

50 P-B4 

If 50 KtxP, R-R7ch; 51 K-KG (not 51 K-KtG? 
BxPch; 52 KxP, R-KKt7 with a mating at- 
tack), BxP with advantage to Black. 


50 ... . 

PxP 

51 P*Kt5 

R-Kt7 

52 K-Kt6 

R-Kt7ch 

53 K-B5 

■ » V 1 

If 53 KxP? B-K7cli etc. 

53 ... . 

BhBSI 

54 P-Kt6? 

1 1 1 p 

White is bewitched, Euwe gives 54 K-K6 as 

the only chance. 

54 ... , 

R-Kt7! 

Not. only attacking the KtP, 

but threatening 

mate in six 'beginning with 55 

. . , BxPch ; 56 

K-KW, R-Kt7ch etc. 

55 K-Kt6 

BxPl 

Renewing the mating threat. 

56 KxP 

B-K31 

57 Kt-85 

RxP 

58 R-B7 

BxKt 

59 PxB 

R-Kt7 

Resigns 


The last and final tournament of the Ameri- 
can Chess Federation was held in New York in 
the late summer of 1939- Since then— as you 
all know — the American Chess Federation and 
the National Chess Federation have merged 
under the banner of the United States Chess 
Federation. It seems particularly fitting that 
this final tournament of the American Chess 
Federation should be suitably commemorated, 
and the United States Chess Federation takes 
pleasure in announcing that this has been, done. 
A ninety-six page book has just come from the 
printer and is now being distributed free of 
charge to all members of the Federation. We 
believe that this book will be of great interest 
and value to chess players, club secretaries, di- 
rectors of local tournaments, etc. About half 
the book is devoted to the best games of the 
tournament with notes by Fred Reinfdd, and 
the other half of the book gives a story 
of the tournament, editorials, the laws of chess 
which are recognized by the United States 
Chess Federation as of the official code, the 
merger agreement of the A.C.F. and the N.C.F., 
an open letter by the president of the U.S.F.C, 
etc. The book ts illustrated. 

May I call to the attention of all chess 
players — and emphasize it once more — the hook 
if free to members of the Untied States Chess 
Federation, Membership dues are very mod- 
erate — $1.50 per year if you want a cloth-bound 
book and $1.00 if you wish a paper-covered 
book. Club membership is $5.00 per year 
which also includes a year's subscription to 
either the Chess Review or the American Chess 
Bulletin. Won't you send in your membership 
now? Our goal for 1940 is 2,000 members 
and we are still short of our objective. Help 
us grow! Do your share! For our part, we 
pledge to give you the biggest value you have 
ever received for a dollar bilk So sit right 
down, please, and send your 1940 membership 
in the United States Chess Federation to Ernest 
Olfe, Asst Treas., 1111 North 10th Street, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Many thanks!! 

GEORGE STURGIS, 

President . 


CHESS BY SHORT WAVE RADIO 

A. O. Holt, live-wire editor of a Minneapolis 
chess column, recently won a 55-move game by 
short wave from E. C, Johnson, district plant 
engineer of the N. W. Bell Telephone Co. The 
amateur who aired the moves were D. M. 
Heath of Willmar, Minn. (W9HEO) and Stan- 
ley Potter of St. Cloud, Minn. (W9TUR). 



Problem Department 

By Vincent L. Eaton 

Address all correspondence relating to this department to V+L* Eaton, 2237 Q Street, N.W., Washington, D.C 
Questions About Problem Matters Will Be Answered If Accompanied By Return Postage. 


It is with very great pleasure that we begin 
the publication of a new and highly important 
paper by Alain C, White, America's ablest 
critic and student of the Chess problem, Mr. 
White's essay— 'his first long contribution to 
problem theory since the Christmas Series was 
discon tinned — is in the nature of a summary 
ot‘ sixty years' development in the field of the 
two-mover, illustrated with an equal number of 
selected positions. In preparing the material 
Mr. White was aided by Mr. F. Damage, whose 
brilliant problems are well-known to Review 
solvers, and Mr. Com ins Mansfield, who is 
thought by many to be the greatest composer 
of twounovers England has produced, (Inch 
dentally, the paper informally celebrates Mr. 
White’s sixtieth birthday, which occurred on 
March 3rd.) This month's installment is in- 
troductory; in our next issue will begin the 
publication of the selected problems, with Mr. 
White's analysis, 

* # * * * 

SIXTY TWO-MOVERS OF THE 
PAST SIXTY YEARS 

By Alain C. White 

The passing of three score years has wrought 
changes everywhere about us which in ret- 
rospect, seem almost past belief. Even in the 
very limited field of the two move Chess prob- 
lem the changes have been sufficiently remark- 
able to justify an attempt at this time to ap- 
praise them. 

I have invited F. damage and C, Mansfield 
to help me In selecting some outstanding posi- 
tions to Illustrate in themselves the passing 
of these 60 years, and I am most grateful for 
the help of my two friends. We have each 
independently chosen 25 problems and, allow- 
ing for some duplications* the series of dia- 
grams which will be published in the next 
issues has resulted. Above each will be pub- 
lished the initials of the person or persons by 
whom the problems were picked out. 

It is a varied series for, aside from our var- 
ied tastes, we have approached our selections 
in somewhat different lights. Mansfield has 
looked at his material as a tourney judge, pick- 
ing out only what he considered best, search- 
ing out a wide variety of styles, but in each 
the best* Damage has dealt with his problems 
as a composer, emphasizing those he felt were 
constructively most satisfactory and including 
illustrations of particular types of composition 
and of the works of a few great composers 
otherwise not represented. I have reviewed 
the two-mover as a solver and have recovered 
a few positions which, at different periods, 
have given me special pleasure. Together we 
have achieved, I hope, some measure of com- 
prehensive choice, wherein the reader will find 
some of his own favorites, but certainly not 
all of them, and when the problems have been 
studied we would appreciate hearing from the 
reader, both as to the ones that have pleased 
him most and as to any others that he may feel 
should not have been omitted. 


In these five dozen problems one feels a 
surge of thought, something within the chess* 
men becoming more and more dynamic with 
the passing decades. It is as if fragments of 
the increasingly complex life about one were 
reflected upon the chessboard. Key* defense* 
and mate — there is nothing more in each posi- 
tion; but the genius of great composers has 
extracted from this simple formula results of 
supreme artistry In ever more intricate weave. 
Their trains of thought no longer travel ardu- 
ously in old-fashioned coaches on a single 
track-line* as it were, but in streamlined ease 
on a perfect four-track roadbed, 

it seems to me, In looking back, as if there 
had been four principal periods in the history 
of two-move composition. First* beginning 
nearly a century ago* certainly before 1860, 
and gaining greatly in strength at the time 
when our review opens* about 1SS0* there was 
a period of discovery which lasted until the 
close of the 19 th century. In this period were 
discovered most of the new trends of thought, 
new motives and values, wherein the two*move 
problem differs from the game of Chess. Sec- 
ondly, lasting from the dawn of the new cen- 
tury until about 1915, there followed a period 
of intensive exploration of all these new princi- 
ples and of the powers of the individual pieces 
in interpreting them, Thirdly* from 1915 to 
1930, came a great period of fruition wherein 
direct and combined primary themes were 
presented in an almost bewildering succession 
of masterpieces. And* finally* since 1930 we 
have been in the midst of a second period of 
fruition in which emphasis has been laid on 
presenting these primary themes in compen- 
sating form, balancing motives one against an- 
other, as I will try to explain as our review 
progresses. 

(To be continued) 

# # i* m # 

PROBLEMS AND PEOPLE 

Two of the beat-liked and most greatly- 
admired people in the Chess problem field were 
Morris and Isador Hochberg. Unfortunate 
physical handicaps forced the two brothers to 
live shut-in lives; nevertheless they applied 
themselves to intensive study and secured the 
equivalent of college degrees without being 
able to leave their house. They took up Chess 
as a mental resource* and became devoted to 
problems. First they solved jointly; then they 
began to compose; and for more than a year 
they were co-editors of the C. C. L. A, Bulletin 
problem section. Early in March, death came 
to Morris; now comes the sad news that his 
brother has followed him. All of us — their 
friends and correspond ents— deeply mourn 
their passing. 

* m * * * 

Dr. C. S. Middleton contributes this clever 
“challenge problem” and sponsors an informal 
solving tourney open to all. In the dia- 
grammed position. White is to play and stale- 
mate himself In an unstated number of moves. 


93 


94 . 


The Chess Review 


No. 160G 

DR* G, DOBBS 
Carrollton, Ga. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1601 

WILL C. DOD 

Oxford, Ohio 


Dedicated to Dr* P, G. Keeney 



Mate in 2 


No. 1602 

CLAUDE DU BEAU 


Stockton, N* J. 



Mate in 2 



Original Section 

No. 1603 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 



Mate in 2 


No. 1604 

DR. P, G, KEENEY 
Bellevue, Ky* 



Mate in 2 


No. 1605 

BURNEY M, MARSHALL 
Shreveport, La. 



Mate in 2 


No, 1606 

GEOFFREY MOTT-SM ITH 
New York, N. Y. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1607 

GEOFFREY MOTT-SM ITH 
New York, N. Y* 



EITHER SIDB Mates in 2 


No* 1608 
F. W. WATSON 
Toronto, Canada 



Mate in 2 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE JULY 3, 1940 














Original Section (cont’d) 


No* 1609 

C* B. COOK 


Fort Worth, Texas 



Mate in 3 


No. 1610 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 



Mate in 3 


No, 1.611 

A* J* FINK 


San Francisco, Cal. 



No. 16i£ 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N, Y. 



Mate in 3 


No, 161.3 

CLAUDE DU BEAU 
Stockton, N* J. 



Mate in 4 


No. 1614 

THOMAS S* McKENNA 


Lima, Ohio 



Mate in 4 


No* 1616 

AUREL TAUBER 

New York, N. Y. 
(After W. A. Shinkman) 



Mate in 4 


No. 1616 

F, W. WATSON 
Toronto, Canada 



SELF -mate in 3 


no. :8.!.r 

C. B. COOK 
Fort Worth, Texas 



SEEF-mate in 4 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE JULY 8, 1940 


















96 


Thu Chess R e v i l w 


Dr. Middleton will give a five-dollar prise for the 
“first and best solution." The requirements 
are: ('!) that it be the briefest, solution work- 
able against any legal Black defense; (2) that 
if be the first of its type to reach his hands* 
Address your solutions to Dr. C. S. Middleton, 
U, S r Veterans’ Administration, Biloxi, Miss- 
issippi, mentioning the date on which you 
received your copy of the Review. Results 
of the contest will be announced in this de- 
partment. 

* ffc 



Geoffrey Mott-Smith's No, 1607 wins first 
prize in the informal composing tourney an- 
pounced last October, for problems with the 
condition "Either side mates in two moves,” 
and with quiet key moves in each position. The 
number of entries received was disappointingly 
small, but the prize-winner stands out as a 
clever 'blend of shut- off and opposition ideas. 

No, 1601 is a niueh-compre&sed setting of a 
familiar theme. It has, we believe, been done 
in miniature form with a promoted Black piece 
. * . No. 1609 has as its motto “The Usurpers," 
for reasons which will be clearer when the 
solution is discovered , . . No. 1 63 0 was com- 
posed blindfold, while we were ruminating 
over Mr. Rot hen berg’s recent article . . . Dr. 
Dobbs sends No, 1600 from a hospital bed; we 
hope that he will have recovered by the time 
he sees it in print . . . Nos. 1612 and 1615 are 
sequels to the studies featured in Mr. Tauber’s 
recent, essay , . * The “Quoted Section” is 
omitted this month, to allow space for other 
material. 


( i W hit e s u eak p lay agai mi Black s u ei rd 
opening exposes him to unpleasant surprises.) 

Metropolitan Chess League 1940 

IRREGULAR DEFENSE 
N. Levy E. EL Adams 

White Black 


1 P-K4 

Kt-K R3 

10 P-KR3 

Q-R5 

2 P Q4 

P-K Kt3 

11 Kt Q2 

BxP 

3 B-QB4 

P-Q3 

12 PxB 

QxRP 

4 P-QB3 

Kt-B3 

13 Kt-B3 

KKt-Kt5 

5 Kt-K 2 

B-Kt2 

14 R-K 1 

P-KB4 

6 0-0 

P-K4 

15 PxP 

RxP 

7 PxP 

KtxP 

16 RxKt 

BxR 

8 B~Kt3 

0-0 

Resigns 


9 Kt-Kt3 

K-R1 





( Fine's seemingly 

maHer-ojdact play here 

come ah his unobtrusive artistry,) 


Marshall C t C* 

Championship 1940 



BIRD’S 

OPENING 


H. Set dm an 

R. Fine 


White 

T 

Black 

1 

P-KB4 

P-Q4 

22 KPxP B-KB1 

2 

P-K3 

Kt-KB3 

23 Q-B1 B-B4ch 

3 

Kt-K B3 

P-K Kt3 

24 B-K3 Kt-Kt5 

4 

P-B4 

B-Kt2 

25 BxB QxBch 

5 

Kt-B3 

0-0 

26 K-R 1 * B-B3 

6 

Q“Kt3 

P-K3 

Rightly foregoing 

7 

P-Q4 

P-B4 

the win of the ex- 

3 

B-K2 

Kt-B3 

change. 

9 

0-0 

KLQR4 

27 Kt-QI Q-KR4 

10 

G-B2 

BPxP 

28 P-K R3 R-K1 

11 

KKtxP 

KtxP 

29 K-Ktl BxKt 

12 

BxKt 

PxB 

30 PxKt BxP{5) 

13 

Q-R4 

Q-B2 

31 PxP Q-B4ch 

14 

Kt(3)-Kt5 

Q-B4 

32 K-R 1 QR-Q1 

15 

B-Q2 

P-OR3 

White resigns — a 

16 

K t - R 3 

P-Q Kt4 

bib prematurely per- 

17 

K t ( 3 } x P 

B-Q2 

haps, but the more 

18 

Q-R3 

Q R4 

one studies the posi- 

19 

Kt-B3 

KR-Ktl 

tion, the more appar- 

20 

P-QKt3 

P-K4 

ent. does its hopeless- 

21 

KUB3 

Px BP 

ness become. 


(An exciting game! ) 



Marshall C. C. Championship 1939-1940 

QUEEN’S GAMBIT DECLINED 

M. L. Hanauer S. N. Bernstein 

White Black 

A 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

21 

P-B4 


R-B2 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K 3 

22 

0-0 


Q-B1 

3 

K1-QB3 

P-Q4 

23 

Q-Kt3 


B-K3 

4 

KLB3 

B-K2 

24 

P-Kt4 


K-R1 

5 

8-Kt5 

0-0 

25 

PxP 


BxB P 

6 

P-K3 

QKUQ2 

26 

BxB 


RxB 

7 

R-B1 

P-B3 

27 

Kt-K2 


R-R5 

8 

Q-B2 

P-QR3 

28 

Q-B2 


R-R6 

9 

P-Q R3 

P-K t4 

29 

R Kt3 


RxR 

10 

P-B5 

P-K4 

30 

QxR 


BxP 

11 

PxP 

Kt-Kt5 

31 

Q-K3 


P-B4 

12 

QB-B4 

KtxQBP 

32 

Kt Kt3 


PxP 

13 

P R3 

Kt-R3 

33 

Q-KB3 


R-B2 

14 

BxKt 

PxB 

34 

P-B5 


Q-Kt2 

15 

Kt-Q4 

Q-K1 

35 

P-K6 


R-B3 

16 

P-Q Kt4 

Kt-K3 

36 

K-R1 


B-K2 

17 

B-Q3 

P-Q R4 

37 

KUR5 


Q-Kt4 

18 

R-QKtl 

PxP 


Black 

overstepped 

19 

PxP 

KtxKt 

the time 

limit, but 

20 

PxKt 

P-KB4 

the game 

is lost. 


AIRLINE HOSTESSES PLAY CHESS 

' Every time a hostess boards a plane, she has 
1,177 articles of equipment to check and 
handle, including chess and checker boards, 
typewriters, toothpicks and an electric shaver 
. . . an air hostess must know how to do prac- 
tically everything, because her duties include 
such things as playing chess (if a passenger 
can t find someone else to play with),” — Wal- 
ter Winched, in his column On Broadway. 




HONOR PRIZE PROBLEM 

DR. J. HANSEN 
Copenhagen, Denmark 








white mates in two moves 



The OFFICIAL ORGAN OF the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA CHESS FEDERATION 


Modern Chess 


o 



EUWE * WHITE * REINFELD * ADAMS 



JUNE' JULY 1940 


MONTHLY 35 cents 


ANNUALLY $3.00 





Official Organ of the 
United States of America 
Chess Federation 


rThe 


CHESS 

REVIEW 


1. A. H Oft O WITZ 
Fred Reineeld 
Editors 


Vol. VIII, No, 5 


Jmie-juJy 1940 


Published bi-monthly June - September ; published 
monthly October - May by The Chess Review, 25 
West 43rd Street, New York, N. Y. Telephone 
Wisconsin. 7-3742, Domestic subscriptions; One 
Year 53.00; Two Years $5,50; Five Years $12,50. 
Single copy 30 cents. Foreign subscriptions; $3-50 
per year except U, S. Possessions, Canada, Mexico, 
Central and South America. Single copy 35 cents. 

Copyright 1939 by The Chess Revifav 

Entered as second-class matter January 25, 1937 at 
the post office at New York, N. Y., under the Act 
of March 3, 1879. 


AN APPEAL TO SUBSCRIBERS 

I have been publishing the Review since Jan, 
1933. In all that time, the Review has never 
paid for itself; it has been subsidized by me 
through outside income, such as chess tours, 
lectures, etc. 

The late appearance of the magazine is a 
source of great embarrassment both to sub- 
scribers and to me; and I lose their goodwill 
because of this. Therefore, by publishing two 
double issues during the period june-September 
inclusive and thus cutting out two issues, the 
magazine will always come out on time, thus 
avoiding these embarrassing delays for all of 
us. In this manner the magazine will become 
self-sustaining. 

As you probably all know, prices have in- 
creased tremendously in printing and paper; 
so you can see that it is a question of either 
raising the subscription price and publishing 
the magazine twelve times a year, or cutting 
down to ten issues without an increase in price. 

We all know that the summer months are 
pretty slow; but I can assure you that the maga- 
zine will be better, and whenever chess interest 
is at its peak, especially in the winter months, I 
will add more pages to certain issues. All the 
subscribers up to the present time will be get- 
ting their twelve issues, but from the time of 
thfe appearance of this issue, new subscribers 
will get ten issues. 

I trust that all of you will kindly bear with 
me. My sincerest thanks are extended to the 
subscribers of The Chess Review for their 
steadfast loyalty and cooperation in every pos- 
sible way. — /. A. Horowitz 

Good News for American Chess Players 

The Open Championship Tournament and 
Congress of the United States Chess Federation 
will take place in Dallas on August 19-28. 
The tourney will be held at the air-conditioned 
Hotel Adolphus, one of the finest hotels in 


the Southwest. The Dallas Committee is bend- 
ing all its efforts toward making the event 
a great success, and is particularly concentrating 
on raising a substantial prize fund. An addi- 
tional feature which may materialize is the 
participation of Central and South American 
players. Contributions to the tournament fund 
may be sent to George Emlen Roosevelt, Vice- 
President and Treasurer, 30 Pine Street, New 
York City; or to J..C Thompson, 702 Monte- 
Vista, Dallas, Texas. With travel rates as 
low as they are this year, a strong eastern dele- 
gation should be present. 


ee ril See You at Colgate ” 

1940 NEW YORK STATE 
CHESS ASSOCIATION 
62nd ANNUAL TOURNAMENT 

At 

Colgate University/ Hamilton, N. Y. 

# . 

Genesee Cup Contest, Aug. 17, 18 

Organize a team of four to represent your 
county in this classic contest. 

Open Tournament. Aug. 19 io 24 

State championship section and several other 
classified sections of ten for players of all 
degrees of playing strength from master to 
beginner. 

Dr. Emanuel Lasker 

former World Champion will be present dur- 
ing the entire course of the tournament and 
will give a simultaneous exhibition. 


: OUT-OF-STATE PLAYERS WELCOME : 


Printed Program on Request. Address 
Dr. C. Harold King, President, NYSCA, 

Hamilton, N. Y. 




97 



u. s. 



Reshevsky again reveals his virtuosity with 
one of his favorite strategical maneuvers: the 
Q side minority attack . 

INDIAN DEFENSE 

(Notes by Fred Reinfeld) 

S. Reshevsky A. S. Pinkus 

White 13 lack 


1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

7 Kt-B3 

PxP 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K Kt3 

8 BxP 

QKt-Q2 

3 

K1-QB3 

P-Q4 

9 0-0 

Kt-Kt3 

4 

B-B4 

B-Kt2 

10 B-K2 

B-K3 

5 

Q-Kt3 

P-B3 

11 Q-B2 

QKt-Q4 

6 

P-K3 

0-0 

12 B.K5 

B-B4 


Very studious play thus far, all of it having 
been fished out of the latest edition of Modern 
Chess Openings, P, 204, column 136. 

13 Q-Q21 .... 

In the game Cap-ablanca-Fiohr, Se mine ring 
1037 there followed 13 Q-Kt3, Q-Kt3 with about 
an even game, although Flohr blundered later 
and lost. 

13 ... . R-B1 

14 KR-B1 \ Q-Q2 

The plausible 14 . . , P-B4 is met by 15 
KtxKt, QxKt; 16 B-QB1, Q-Q2; 17 PxP and the 
P cannot be retaken. 

15 P-KR3 KR-Q1 

16 KtxKt KtxKt 


with P-K4 and advance on the Q side with 
P-KtEL 

20 K-R2 B- K3 

21 P-QR4 B-B2 

22 Kt-K 1 I R-R 1 

23 Kt-Q3 P~Kt3 

To keep White's Kf. out of the powerful post 
QI35, but. this is only a stop-gap. 

24 R-B2 3 P-K3 

White's last move threatened F-K4, hence a 
more useful retreat than QB2 had to be pre- 
pared for the Kt. 

25 R-Q1 B-B1? 

After this, Black's game goes downhill rapid- 
ly. Better was 25 „ . . BxP; 26 Pxl3 f KtxKP 
etc,; but not 25 ♦ . . P-R4; 26 PxP, PxP (If 
26 , . , RxP; 27 P-K4, Kt-K 2 ; 28 QxP, RxP; 
29 Kt-B5); 27 Kt-B5 with decisive advantage. 

26 P-K4 KPK2 

Pinkus 




RESHEVSKY 

After 16,.. PxKt; 17 Q-R5 White would 
have a slight but appreciable positional ad- 
vantage — if only because Black's KB would he 
somewhat out of play. 

17 P-Q Kt4 P-B3 

A difficult decision. 17 . . . BxB seems more 
desirable, as Black’s KB will be decidedly less 
useful than White's QB; but after 18 KtxB, 
Q-Q3; 19 P-R3 White likewise maintains pres- 
sure. 


Reshevsky 

27 P-R5 ! QxP 

Allowing a pretty finish, but if 27 . . , PxP; 
28 Kt-BS and White has matters all his own 
way, 

28 QxQ RxQ 

29 PxP p. K4 

This is evidently the move on which Black 
relied to take the sting out of P-Kt7. 

30 KtxPl RxKtP 

Or 30 . . . RxR; 3J RxR, PxKt; 32 BxP fol- 
lowed by P-Kt7. No better is 30 . . . PxKt; 
31 RxR t PxR; 32 P-Kt7 etc. 

31 Kt-Q7 1 B-Kt6 

Else White plays B-E7 followed by Kt-B5. 

32 R-QKtl BxR 

If 32 . t . P-QR4 ; 33 R(2)-KL2, P-R5; 34 B- 
Q6 and wins. 


18 B-Kt3 B-R3 

19 Q Kt2 P-R3 

White now operates with two attractive stra- 
tegical goals in view: -advance in the center 


33 RxR Kt-Q4 

34 P-Kt7 Resigns 

A delightful tactical culmination of fine stra- 
tegic play. 


93 





June — July 1940 


99 


U. S. Championship Preliminaries 
QUEEN'S PAWN OPENING 
(Nates by Fred Rein f eld) 

O. Ulvestad F, Reinfeld 


White 


Black 

1 P-Q4 

Kt-K B3 

9 P-K3 

0-0 

2 Kt-KB3 

P-K3 

10 B-Q3 

Q-K2 

3 P-QR3 

P-Q4 

11 0-0 

Kt-K5 

4 QKt-Q2 

B-Q3 

12 R-K1 

P-K B4 

5 P-B4 

P-QKt3 

13 B-Kt2 

R-B3 

6 Q-B2 

QK t-Q2 

14 Kt-BI 

R-R3 

7 PxP 

PxP 

15 P-Kt5 

P-Kt4 

8 P-QKt4 

B-Kt2 

16 QR-B1 

P-Kt5 

White now 

sacrifices 

a P in order 

to obtain 

a troublesome 

pressure 

on the long 

diagonal. 

17 Kt-K5!7 

BxKt 

27 B-R1 

P-B4 

18 PxB 

R-QB1 

28 PxP e.p. 

BxP 

19 BxKt 

BPxB 

29 Q-B3 

R-Q2 

20 P-K6 

RxKP 

30 P-R3 

PxP 

21 Kt-Kt3 

Q-B2 

31 KtxRP 

B-R5 

22 K1-K2 

Kt-K4 

32 R-Q4 

R (2) -B2 

23 Kt-B4 

R-K2 

33 G Kt4 

B-B3 

24 Q-B3 

P-KR3 

34 Kt-B4 

P-QR4 

25 KR-Q1 

K-R2 

35 Q-B3 

P-Kt4 

26 Q-Q4 

Kt-B5 

36 R(1 )-Q1 

R-Q2 


Reinfeld 




Ulvestad 


Greatly pressed for time, Black has advanced 
his Q side Ps too rapidly, instead of stopping 
to consolidate his position. White is now able 
to embark on a clever line of play, 

37 KtxPl 

The sealed move, on which Ulvestad took 
almost half an hour. There is more here than 
appears on the surface. 

37 , . , , BxKt 

38 RxB RxR 

39 RxR . . . , 

If now 39 . . . Kt-Kt3 ; 40 R-KB5! gives 

White a winning position. And in view of 
Black's vulnerability on the long diagonal and 
the shakiness of his Pawn position, his game 
looks desperate. 

39 ... . R-KKtl ! ! 

A surprising move which saves everything. 
It has two points, the first of which Is to guard 
KKt2, thus threatening * „ . QxR. 

40 Q-Q4 

With the .seemingly murderous threat of R- 
Q7. After 40 R-Q4 or 40 R-Ql, the game would 
likewise be a draw. 


40 ... . RxPch! 1 

This is the second point. The game was 
given up as a draw, as White cannot avoid 
perpetual check; for instance 41 KxR (41 
Km, R-R7chf ), Q-BGch ; 42 K-Ktl, Q-Kt5ch; 
43 K-Bl, Q-RGch ; 44 KK1, Q-RSch; 45 K-K2, 
Q-B&ch etc, or 12 K-R2, QxPch; 43 K-R3, Q-B6 
eh; 44 K-R4, Q-B7ch etc. 



REINFELD 


(This game was awarded the prize for the 
most brilliant game beginning with 1 P-K4.) 

FRENCH DEFENSE 


(Notes by W. W. Adams) 


W, W. Adams 


I. Kashdan 


White 


Black 


1 P-K4 P-K3 4 B-Kt5 

2 P-Q4 P-Q4 & P-K5 

3 Kt-QB3 Kt-K B3 6 BxB 


B-K2 

KKbQ2 


The latest analysis purports to show a favor- 
able game for White by 6 P-KR4 (the Alekhme- 
Chatard Attack), But 1 am not over-familiar 
with this line, and besides, that. Kashdan per- 
mits it does not speak highly in its favor. 


6 . . . . QxB 

7 B-Q3 


7 Q-Q2 or 7 P^B4 is more usual, but I am 
convinced that 7 B-Q3 is the strongest move, 
though it opens to Black extreme complica- 
tions, if he chooses. 


7 


P-QR3 


8 QK1-K2 P-Q B4 

9 P-QB3 Kt-QB3 

10 Q-Q2 0-0 


11 P-KB4 P-B4 

12 Kt-B3 P-QKt4 

13 0-0 B,Kt2 


Throughout the game Black suffers from the 
ineffectiveness of bis QB, a characteristic of 
this variation. 


14 P-KR3 P-B5 

Slower but more deadly than the alternative 



100 


The Chess Review 


14 . - - PxP. The -attacks on both sides are 
slow in developing, but as : usual iin -such -cases 
fireworks -are promised when they finally cul- 
minate. 


(Black compromises his game with faulty 
opening play.) 

PETROFF DEFENSE 


15 B-B2 P-Kt5 18 PxBP KKtPxP 

16 P-Kt4 F-Kt3 19 K-R2 K-R1 

17 Kt-Kt3 P-QR4 20 R-B2 

Providing for QR-KKtl before Black -can 
play * * . F-R5 and , * . P-Kt6 + 

20 ... , R-KKtl 

21 R-KKtl P-R5 

22 R (2) -Kt2 P-R6 

23 Kt-Kt5. QR-KB1 


Sacrificing the KtP, but to resolve the Q 
side P situation by 23 . * * PxBP would leave 
White free -to continue his attack on the K 
side via KtxKF followed by BxP etc. 

24 PxKtP P-R3 


This move has been criticised because it 
forces White into- an apparently sound sacri- 
fice. Yet if Black had not made this move, 
White would simply have consolidated his F 
at QKt4, and then have played for the ending 
with a P to the good. Of course, if 24 . . * 
KtxKitP; 25 KtxBP, PxKt; 2G QxKt! 


(Notes by Fred Reinfeld) 

L Kashdan A. Kupchik 

White Black 


1 P-K4 P-K4 

2 KLKB3 Kt-KB3 

3 KtxP P-Q3 

4 KLKB3 KtxP 


5 P-Q4 

6 B-Q3 

7 0-0 

8 P-B4 


P-Q4 

B-K2 

0-0 

Kt-KB3 


Perhaps . . . P-QB3 was preferable, all the 
more since Black’s later , , . K1-Q-B3 turns out 
to be of little value. 


9 Kt-B3 Kt-B3 

But here 9 . * . PxP; 10 BxP, QKt-Q2 (to 
be followed by . ( , Kt-Kt3-Q4) was definitely 
better. 


10 P-B5 ! 

Leaving Black with a terribly cramped game. 


10 ... . B-Kt5 

11 B-K3 Q-B1 

12 R-K1 R-K1 

13 P-KR3] B-K3 


Kashdan 



Adams 


White's last move forced Black to renounce 
one .of the QB’s two diagonals. Thus 1.3 . . * 
B-R4 maintains the pin, but then 14 B-QKt5 is 

v & rv q iirlr wfivrl 

very awkward. 

14 P-R3 Kt-Ktl 

Bravely admitting that the development of 
the QKt was wrong. Black is in a terrible 
quandary, for if 14 * . . P-QR3; 15 P-QKt4 fol- 
lowed by the usual Q side advance is strong; 
while if 14 . * . P-QR4 ; 15 B-QK-t-5 is again 
annoying. The text avoids these difficulties, 
but the harm done to Black's development is 
irreparable. 

15 Q-B2 P-B3 

. . . P-RR3 would prevent the following move, 
but would weaken the K side. 

Not 16 . . . F-KR3; 17 KtxB, PxKt (if 17 
. - . QxKt; IS BxP); IS B-Kt6 and Black’s 
KP is not long for this world. 


25 KtxKP QxKt 

26 BxP Q-K2 

Not 26 . . . RxB; 27 KtxR, RxRch ; 23 QxR, 
QxKt; 29 Q mates. 

27 BxKt QxB 

28 P-Kt5 1 Kt-Q1 

Relatively better was 23 . „ ♦ Kt-K2; 29 P- 
B5, KtxP; 30 Kt-R5, RxRch; 31 QxR, QxPl 
32 P-K13 3 Q-Q2 (3fe . . , PxP? 33 Kt-B6 or 32 
B-Bl ; 33 Kt-B4); 33 Kt-B6, Q-KB2; 34 P-Kt4 r 
B-Bl; 35 Q-Q2 etc. with intriguing possibili- 
ties. 


29 P-B5 Q-R2 

30 P-K6 .... 

Now White's Fs become irresistible. 


16 Kt-KKt5 P-KK13 

17 KtxB QxKt 

18 B-KKt5 Q-Q2 

Black is burdened with one disagreeable 
situation after another. If IS * . . Q-Bl? (in 
order to make way for the QKt), there follows 
19 RxB, RxR; 20 BxKt etc, 

19 R-K3 B-Q1 22 R-K1 BxB 

20 Q-K2 RxR 23 QxB Kt-Kt2 

21 QxR K1-R4 24 R-K7 Q-Q1 

The exchanges of the last few moves have 
failed to eliminate the pressure. White now 
wins a P, while Black still struggles with his 
development. 

25 Q-B6 Q-KB1 28 QxQch KxQ 

26 RxKtP KLK3 29 Kt-K2 P-QR4 


30 

V ¥ I i 

PxP 

34 

Q-K5ch 

Q-Kt2 

31 

QxKtP 

P-R4 

35 

P-B6 

Q-B2 

32 

Q-K2 

P-R5 

36 

Kt-B5 

Resigns 

33 

P-K7 

R-K1 

. 





(All our -photos from the championship ap- 
pear by courtesy of the Eastern Film. Labor- 
atories.) 


27 P-QKT4 Q-Kt2 30 P-KtO PXP 

Now White has a passed QBP, and the Q-P 
cannot last long. 

31 BxQKtP Kt-R3 ' 

32 BxKt . . . , 

Kashdan exchanges a B for a Kt! There 

must be a reason! 

32 . , * . RxB 

33 R Q7 .... 



June — July 19 4 0 


101 


There is a reason. Now the Q-F falls, leaving 
White two connected passed Ps to the good, 

33 R-FM 

34 RxP 

35 P-BG 
35 R-K5 
37 Kt-B3 

An admirably clear and 
Kushdan. Black had no real 
ting so cramped a position 


R-QKtl 

R-Kt7 

Kt-B2 

Resigns 

simple game by 
chance after get- 
in the opening. 


(He laughs best etc.) 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 

(Notes by Fred Rein fold) 

G. Liftman S. N, Bernstein 



White 



Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-QB4 

12 

KtxKt 

KtPxKt 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

13 

KR-K1 

B-Kt2 

3 

Kt-B3 

Kt-B3 

14 

P-K5 

PxP 

4 

P-G4 

PxP 

15 

PxP 

R-Q1 

5 

KtxP 

P-Q3 

16 

Q-B4 

RxRch 

6 

B-QB4 

P-K3 

17 

RxR 

Kt-Q4 

7 

B-KKt5 

B-K2 

18 

BxKt 

KPxB 

8 

Q-Q2 

P-QR3 

19 

R-B1 

0 O 

9 

0-0-0 

Kt-K4 

20 

R-B3 

BxB 

10 

B-Kt3 

Q-B2 

21 

QxB 

R-K1 

11 

P-B4 

Kt-B3 





White's opening advantage has gradually 
evaporated and he must now lose the KP (if 
22 R-B5, EM3 1). He therefore plays for an 
ingenious swindle. 

22 R-K37I . . . . 


Bernstein 



Littman 


White hopes for 22 , . . P-Q5; 23 Kt-K4, 

PxR; 24 Kt-B6ch, K-Bl (not 24 . . . K-Rl? 
25 KtxiR, P4B3; 26 PxP followed by PxPch and 
Kt-Bticli winning); 25 KtxPch, K-Ktl ; 25 Kt- 
Btich with a draw. 

However, after 22 . . , P-Q5; 23 K.t-K4 Black 
can win with 23 , , , K-Bl! The method ac- 
tually selected is more amusing. 

22 ... . P-R3! 

White is now unable to guard the KP, pre- 
vent , , + P~Q5 and also observe K7, The Q 
must renounce at least one of these vital 
tasks, 

23 Q-Kt3 .... 

If 23 Q-B4j F~B3 wins. 



BERNSTEIN 


23 . a , . P-Q5 

24 Kt-K 4 PxR 


Capturing the KP would of course be a 
blunder because of 25 Kt-BGch. 


25 

Kt-B6ch 

K-B1 


26 

QxPch?I 

.... 


The only 

move, since 

if 2fi Kt-R7ch, 

K-K2 

etc, 




26 

■ ■ B 

KxQ 


27 

KtxRch 

K-B1 


28 

KtxQ 

K.-K2 


. , , And 

the Kt is trapped! The rest is 

easy. 




29 K-Q1 

K-Q2 

38 P-R4 

B-B7 

30 P-K6ch 

PxP 

39 P-K t5 

PxP 

31 KtxKP 

Kx Kt 

40 PxP 

BxP 

32 K-K2 

P-B4 

41 P-Kt6 

K-B3 

33 P~K Kt4 

B-K5 

42 K-Q4 

B-K16 

34 P-B3 

B-Kt8 

43 K-B5 

KxP 

35 P-QR3 

P-B5 

44 K-KtB 

P-R5 

36 KxP 

K-K4 

45 K-B5 

K-B4 

37 P-KR4 

P-QR4 

Resig ns 



White turns on the pressure relentlessly, 

INDIAN DEFENSE 


(Notes by Fred Re inf eld) 

H, Seidman 

Black 


R, Fine 
White 

1 P-Q4 KTKB3 

2 P-QB4 P-K3 

3 KI-KB3 P-GKt3 

7 P“Kt3 


4 P-KKt3 B-Kt2 

5 B-Kt2 B-K2 

6 0-0 0-0 


The more normal 7 Kt-B3 permits the sim- 
plifying reply 7 . . . Kt-K5; hence Fine decides 
on another move which may enable him to 
maintain the tension. 


7 . . . . P-Q4 

8 B-Kt2 P-B4 

9 QKt-Q2 QKt-Q2 

If Black wants to simplify (and why shouldn't 
he, against Fine?), he can play 9 . . . QPxP; 
10 KtxP, PxP; 11 KtxQP (or 11 BxP, Kt-BS), 
BxB ; 12 KxB, Kt-B-3! with equality. 




102 


The Chess Review 




10 P-K3 

R*B1 

19 P-B4 

Kt-B3 

25 PxP 

PxP 

11 Q-K2 

Q-B2 

20 Kt-B3 

QR-Q1 

26 B-B2 

B-B2 

12 QR-B1 

Q-Ktl 

21 QR*Q1 

P-R3 

27 P-KKt4 

PxP 

13 BPxPl 

KPxP 

22 R-Q2 

KR-K1 

28 PxP 

R-K5 

14 K1-K5 

QR-Q1 

23 KR-Q1 

Q-B1 

29 B-Kt3 

OR-K1 

15 P-B4 

PxP? 

24 P-K5 

P-B4 

30 RxP 

KLQ5 


A a error which appreciably strengthens 
White's position: his Kfc is now more firmly 
entrenched on K5, the hostile QP becomes 
more accessible to attack, the hostile KKt can- 
not be sunk at White's K4 t and in general 
White's position acquires more space and ma- 
neuvering elasticity- Black’s one compensation 
is the K hie— or so he hopes. 

The more patient 15 * * , KR-K1, leaving 
White in some doubt as to the opponent’s 
intentions, was decidedly preferable, If then 
16 B-QIR3, PxP; 17 BxB, RxB; IS PxP, Kt-Bl 
followed by * * * Kt-K5 l with better prospects 
than after the text* 

16 PxP KR-K1 

17 P-QR3! Kt-Bl 

Black doubtless avoided * , . P-QE1 because 
it would weaken his Q side* White is now 
able to gain further ground, reserving the 
eventual possibility of bringing his Q to QKt3 
and his QKt to K3, First he settles the prob- 
lem of the K file- 

18 P-QKt4 B-Q3 

19 Q-Q3 Q-R1 


Vainly angling for . * * Kt-K5 which if played 
at once would lead to 20 KtxKt, PxKt; 21 BxP, 
BxB; 22 QxB, P-B3; 23 Q-Q5ch with a winning 
game* 


20 QR-K1 

21 P-Kt5 

22 R-K2 

23 KR-K1 


P-QR4 
R-K2 
QR-K1 
K Kt-G2 


24 Kt-Bl l 

25 KtxKt 

26 RxR 

27 RxR 


P-B3 

KtxKt 

RxR 

BxR 


if Black expected any relief from the fore- 
going exchanges, he is soon undeceived, as 
White now reaches the position outlined in the 
note to Black’s 17th move. 


28 Kt-K3 


P-Kt3 


Or 28 . 
untenable. 

29 0-K13 

30 KtxP 

31 P-QR4I 

32 KtxB 

If 36 * 
PxQ; 39 
and wins* 

37 


PT15 ; 29 Q-B5 etc. The QP is 


K-B1 33 B-R3ch K-B3 

Q-B1 34 Q-K3 K-Kt 2 

P-B4 35 P-Q5 Kt-B4 

KxKt 36 Q-K7ch K-R3 

* * K-Ktl ; 37 BxKt, QxBch; 38 QxQ, 
P-Q6, B-Bl; 40 P-Kt6, K-Bl; 41 P-Q7 


B-Kt2 


Resigns 


A Great Fighting Game 

RUY LOPEZ 


A. C* Simonson 

White 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

3 

B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

4 

B-R4 

P-Q3 

5 

0-0 

Kt-B3 

6 

BxKtch 

PxB 

7 

P-Q4 

PxP 

3 

QxP 

P-B4 

9 

Q-Q3 

B-K3 


R* Fine 

Black 


10 

P-B4 

B-K2 

11 

Kt-B3 

0-0 

12 

P-KR3 

Kt-Q2 

13 

P-Q Kt3 

B*B3 

14 

B*B4 

Q-K2 

15 

KR-K1 

BxKt 

16 

QxB 

P-KB3 

17 

B-KI3 

Q-B2 

13 

Kt-R4 

Kt-K4 


Fine 



Si m o n son 


31 

R (6}xKt 

PxR 

45 

P-B5 

B-K5 

32 

RxP 

R-K6 

46 

B-K3 

K-R2 

33 

R-Q3 

Q-B4 

47 

P-Kt4 

B-B3 

34 

B-B2 

RxR 

48 

B-B4 

Q-B6 

35 

QxR 

Q-R6 

49 

K-Ktl 

P-Kt4 

36 

Q-B2 

Q-Q3 

50 

B-KtS 

K-Kt3 

37 

Kt-K5 

B-K3 

51 

Q-B2ch 

K-R4 

38 

K-Kt2 

B-B1 

52 

Q-R2ch 

K-Kt5 

39 

K-Kt3 

RxKt 

53 

Q-Q2 

Q-R8ch 

40 

PxR 

QxPch 

54 

K-B2 

Q-Kt7ch 

41 

K-Kt2 

BxP 

55 

K-K3 

QxQch 

42 

Q-Q3 

B-B4 

56 

KxQ 

K-B6 

43 

Q-Q2 

Q-K5ch 

57 

K-K1 

P-Kt5 

44 

K-R2 

Q-Kt5 


Resigns 



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THE CHESS REVIEW 

25 W, 43rd STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 



June — July 1940 


103 


Women in Chess 

Random Reflections on the U , S, Women's 
Championship —Congratulations to Mrs. Adele 
Rivero for winning the tournament — and with 
such an excellent score. She lost only one 
game .... This tournament was the strongest 
ever, and the most exciting. Although first 
place was decided during the semi-final round, 
the standing of the other players was uncertain 
until adjourned games of the final round were 
finished , Nice prizes for the players, 

George Em Jen Roosevelt gave a beautiful silver 
tray for first prize. A chess set and the book 
"Chessmen" went to Miss N. May Karff, 
second prize winner. Dr. Helen Weisenstein 
and Mrs. G Isold a Gresser, who shared third 
place, each got elaborate kits of beauty prepara- 
tions, Similar kits, but smaller, went to Mrs. 
Mary Bain and Mrs. Raphael McC ready who 
tied for fifth place. Consolation prizes— chess 

pins — to the remaining players Unusual 

confusion before the tourney started. Should 



MRS. STEPHE NS who handled admission 
tickets at the tournament. 


non -citizens be allowed to compete? This 
question was raised only a few weeks before 
the starting date. In 1938 the citizenship rule 
was abrogated. Final decision, made only a 
few days before the tournament started, al- 
lowed those who held their first papers to 
compete this year. This permitted Mrs. Rivero 
and Dr. Weisenstein to play. Full citizenship 
will be required next time .... Who would 
run the tournament and where it would be 
held was not finally decided until the night 
before the play started, Mrs, Frank Marshall 

again donated her time as director The 

men certainly had the best of the arrangements 
at the Astor — larger tables, more comfortable 
chairs, better light and better protection from 
the fans. But the women were good sports 



MRS. RIVERO MRS, GRESSER 


about it ... . Greatest surprise to us was the 
moment when Miss Raettig resigned to Mrs. 
Rivero, She has a reputation of playing out to 
the bitter end, hoping for stalemate, apparently. 
After she finished her last game she bought 
a beginning chess book. "I thought I needed 
it,” Miss Raettig said, apparently somewhat 
depressed by her poor showing. Some of the 
men who had played against Mrs. Gresser at 
the Marshall Chess Club expected her to win 
the tournament. We weren't so sure, knowing 
that dub play is not an adequate preparation 
for playing in an important tournament. Cer- 
tainly she suffered from "tournament jitters.” 
She said the strain of the tourney took her 
completely by surprise,. She did pretty well, 
at that . . . . She seemed to have a new costume 
for each session. Perhaps it gave her confi- 
dence to feel she looked attractive „ . . . Dr. 
Lasker asked Mrs. Kashdan why she wasn't 
playing, "My husband doesn't want me to,” 
Helen answered, "You should learn to assert 
yourself," the doctor told her .... We felt 
pretty bad ourselves, to have the tournament 
start without us, but we didn’t have the time 
to play * . . . loo bad none of the women from 
the mid -West could have come on to compete 
. . . And whatever has happened to Mrs. Kath- 
ryn Slater and Mrs, Wm. Davey who were such 
promising players in the New York tournament 
of 1937? .... Milton Hanauer complimented 
the women by saying that they were playing 
good chess .... Mrs. Bain still forgets to 
punch her clock when she is short of time. 
She ought to tie a red string around her thumb, 
or something, to remind herself .... As Mrs. 
Gresser mated Miss Karff she said, "I'm sorry.” 
. . . . Mrs. Rivero seemed to have learned to 
control her nervousness. We didn't see a 
single shredded handkerchief around her chair 
♦ . . . The newspapers gave the women good 
publicity. The World -Tele gram wrote up Mrs. 




104 


The Chess Review 



MISS KARFF MRS. McCREADY 


Rivero, and the Sun had an article about Mrs* 
McCready, with pictures of her whole family 
playing chess * * * „ Mrs. Harmath played bet- 
ter chess than you would think from her score. 
She should have drawn several important games. 
More experience in the end game and she will 
place much higher in the next tournament . * * * 
The women had as many spectators as the 
men for some of their games. Hard to get 
near the tables sometimes. — E.LAV. 


Mrs . Rivero disposes of her most formidable 
opponent by admirable endgame play . 




INDIAN 

DEFENSE 




Mrs, A. Rivero 

M tss N. 

May Karff 


White 



Black 

1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

30 

BxKt 


RxB 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K3 

31 

P KR4 


K-Ktl 

3 

Kt-K B3 

P-QKt3 

32 

P-K4 


R(B3)-B2 

4 

P-KKt3 

B-Kt2 

33 

K-K3 


K-B1 

5 

B-K12 

B-K2 

34 

R-B4 


K-K1 

6 

0-0 

0-0 

35 

RxR 


RxR 

7 

KTB3 

Kt-K 5 

36 

P-B4 


K-Q2 

8 

Q-B2 

KtxKt 

37 

R-Kt6 


R-K2 

9 

QxKt 

P-Q3 

33 

K-Q4 


R-B2 

10 

Kt-R4 

Q-B1 

39 

R-Kt4 


P-B3 

11 

BxB 

QxB 

40 

PxPch 


KxP 

12 

Kt-B3 

Kt-Q2 

41 

P-B5 


R-K2 

13 

Q-Q3 

P-KB4 

42 

R-K16 


K-Q2 

14 

Kt-Kt5 

BxKt 

43 

P-R5 


P-R5 

15 

BxB 

P-KR3 

44 

P-Kt4 


P-Kt4 

16 

B-Q2 

P-K4 

45 

P-R3 


K-B2 

17 

PxP 

KtxP 

46 

P-B6 


PxP 

18 

Q-Q5ch 

QxQ 

47 

RxR P 


R-B2 

19 

PxQ 

QR-K1 

48 

R*Kt6 


P-B4 

20 

B-B3 

P-B5 

49 

P R6 


K-B3 

21 

QR-K1 

Kt-Q2 

50 

R=Kt7 


R-B3 

22 

PxP 

RxBP 

51 

P-R7 


R-R3 

23 

P-B3 

P-QR4 

52 

PxP 


R-R5ch 

24 

R-B2 

R-K2 

53 

K-K3 


K-Q4 

25 

R-Kt2 

Kt-B4 

54 

R-K7 


K-B3 

26 

R-Q1 

K-R2 

55 

P-B6 


P.Q4 

27 

R-Q4 R ( B5) -B2 

56 

P-B7 


R.R6ch 

28 

R (Q4)-KKt4 Kt-Q2 

57 

K.B2 


RxKRP 

29 

K-B2 

Kt-B3 

58 

P-B8{Q) 

Resigns 


Her Father: "And what 

are your 

prospects 

of promotion, 

young man?" 




Her Suitor: "Excellent, sir. 

'.['here's no- 

body in the firm below 

me. M 





AN INSTRUCTIVE ENDING 

The recent match for the New Jersey State 
Championship between J. D. Neuss (Cham- 
pion of the North Jersey Chess Association) 
and J. du Bois (Champion of the South Jersey 
Chess Association) ended in a victory for 
Neuss by after some unusually keen 

fighting. After the fifth game the score stood 
21/2-21^, and the last and deciding game was 
worthy of the occasion, going no less than 99 
moves! 

Some of the highlights of this last game 
follow. The excellent notes are by Mr, Neuss. 


Neuss 



Du Bois 


White has just exchanged Rs with a view 
to winning by establishing a passed P on the 
Q'R file. The g a me c o n t i n ue d : 

41 F-R4 P-B4 

P-KU must be prevented. 

42 P-B3 R-Q4 

White's last move again threatened P-K14, 
Now that move would lose (43 P-Kt4, P-Q5 3), 

43 K-B4? 

White saw that this move would win if 
Black replied . . . F-R4. Absolutely essential, 
however, was 43 P-Kt3 threatening to win with 
P-Ql. 

43 . . . . F-B5I 

White’s QKtP .is now stopped. The tables 
are completely turned and Black's passed RP 
becomes the winning factor. 

44 P-Q4 K,B2 

45 K-K5 P-B3 

More effective was 45 . , . P-R4 with obvious 
variations, e.g. 4 G KxP, KxP; 47 K-K4. K-Kt4; 
48 K-R3, P-B3 wins. The RP will advance to 
the seventh with Zugzwang, forcing White to 
advance his KtP, Against 46 K-B5, P-115 ; 47 
K“Kt4 J KxP; 48 KxP, K-B4 wins. 


46 

K-Q6 

P-R4 

53 

K-B8 

Q-R6 

47 

KxP 

P-R5 

54 

K-Kt7 

Q-Kt6ch 

48 

KxKtP 

P-R6 

55 

K-B8 

Q-R6 

49 

P-R5 

P-R7 

56 

K-Kt7 

G-Kt4ch 

50 

P-R6 

P-R8(Q) 

57 

K-B8 

Q-R3ch 

51 

P-R7 

Q-RS 

as 

K,Kt8 

Q-Kt3ch 

52 

K-Kt7 

QxKtPch 

59 

K-R8 

QxBP? 

This makes the win 

very 

laborious 

. Black 





June — J uly 1940 


105 


plans to pick up the remaining Ps and win 
with his extra. Ps. Due to fatigue and time 
pressure, he overlooked the subtle win by 50 
, * •. K-K3 1 ! 60 FdB7, Q-Qlch; 61 K-Kt7, Q- 
K2eh; 62 R-Kt6, Q-Bl; 63 K-Kt7, QxP-ch; 64 
K-Kt8, K’QS wins* 


60 K-Kt7 

61 K-Kt8 

62 K-Kt7 

63 K-Kt8 


Q-K2ch 64 K-BS Q-R5 

Q-Qleh 65 K-K17 Q*Kt6ch 

Q-Q2ch 66 K-BS QxP 

Q-Kt4ch 67 P-R8(Q) QxP 


After about .seven hours of play, the game 
was adjourned at the 80th move in the follow- 
ing position: 


Neuss 



DuBois 


SO * . . . K-B4 

The sealed move. A win is planned by ex- 
hausting White's checks so as to centralize 
the poorly placed Black Q and then advancing 
the K in front of his Ps* 

81 Q-B3ch K-Kt3 

82 Q~Kt4ch 

White cannot take the P, for if S2 QxP, 
Q-Kl-ch; 83 K moves, Q-B2ch and wins* 

82 , K-B2 

83 Q-R5ch K-Kt2 

Any other move allows perpetual check, say 
S3 „ . * K-K3; 84 Q-RSch, K-Q3; S5 Q-Q:R3-ch, 
K-K3; 86 Q-R3ch, K-B3; 87 Q-R4ch, K-B2; 88 
Q-R7 ch etc. 

84 G-Kt4ch K-B1 

85 Q-Q4 

White's checks would soon be exhausted: 
85 Q-B6ch, Q-B2 ; or 85 Q-B4ch, KK1; 86 Q- 
QRSch, K-Ktl; 87 Q-Kt3ch* Q-Kt2 etc* 

85 . * * . Q-K5 

Centralization of the Queen! See the note 
to Black's 80th move. 

86 Q-B6ch K-K1 

87 Q-Q8ch * * . * 

Or 87 Q-RSch, K-B2; 88 Q-R5ch r K-K2; 89 
Q“Kt5ch, K-Q3; 90 Q-Q8ch, K-B3; 91 Q-B7ch, 
K-K t4 ; 92 Q-KtTch, K-R5; 93 CJ-RGch, K-Kt6; 
94 Q-KtGch, K-B6; 95 Q-R5ch, K-Q6 wins. 

87 * * * * K-B2 

88 Q-Q7ch K-Kt3 

89 Q-Q6ch K-Kt4 

90 Q-B5 * * * « 

This does not stop the Pawn advance, 90 
Q-Q8ch was equally futile, however, because 


of 90 * * * K-Kt5; 91 Q-Kt&ch* K-B5 exhausting 
the checks. 

90 * * * . P-B6 

Happily immune because of the Q exchange* 

91 K-Kt7 


The K is better placed at Q7 ? hut he as 
hopelessly aiming for QR8 with the well- 
known stalemate trap in view* 


92 Q-Ktlch 

93 Q*B2ch 

94 Q-Kt3ch 

95 Q-Ktlch 

96 Q-B5ch 


P-B7 

K-B4 

K-K4 

K-Q5 

K-B6 

K-Kt6 


Exhausting the checks once for all. Now 
there is no defense against the threat of Q 
exchange. 

97 Q-B7 Q-Kt5ch 

98 K-R8 P-B8 (Q) 

White resigns* H 99 QxQ, Q4R6ch wins* 


The Queens Women's Chess Club of Cleve- 
land is to our knowledge the most active wo- 
men's chess dub in the United States, It was 
organized in March 193% is a member of the 
United States of America Chess Federation 
and meets weekly in the Union Commerce 
Building. 

The dub, which has an enthusiastic mem- 
bership of 2(5 chess- minded ladies, is proud 
of the fact that it has never missed a meeting 
to date, although it is now entering its third 
year* 

It has played matches with a number of 
men's teams from Cleveland clubs, colleges 
and high schools, as well as Men’s clubs in 
nearby cities, 

Games by correspondence have been played 
with various men’s clubs and players in other 
states. The European games have had to 
be discontinued, because of the troubled times 
abroad. 

Our best wishes to the Queens Women's 
Chess Club, and may it serve as the inspiration 
for many new dubs! 


Bound Volumes 
of 

The Chess Review for 1939 

are now available 

Feat ures in d ude 

♦ More than 225 picked games 

* 297 selected problems 

* Accounts of notable tournaments 

* Important innovations in opening 
phy 

• Articles of general interest 

• Cartoons and photographs 

Price: $3.50 

The Chess Review 

25 West 4 3rd St. New York City 



106 


Thu Chess Review 


Would You Have Seen It? 

Played in a recent Dutch Tournament 


De Bondt 



Uchtman 


(Whit© to move) 

Being the ex-change down, White .is anxious 
to remove the dangerous Black QRF and plays: 

21 BxP? . . * * 

Show how Black now wins a piece by force I 
For the solution sec page 120, 


Marshall C. C, Championship 1939*1940 


Marshall 



Lasker 


(Black to move) 

One would think that the Knight, which 
has just been offered for capture, surely 
cannot be taken because of the ensuing ad- 
vance of the QKtP. But Uie position abounds 
in those sparkling complications of which Mar- 
shall has always been so fond. There followed: 

40 , . * , PxKtll 

41 R-Q2 .... 

If 41 F“Kt7, KxRF; 42 F-KtS{Q) P R-RSch; 
43 KB2, R(4)-R7ch; 44 K-Q3, RxRch with ad- 
vantage to Black, 


41 . . . . R-K5 ! 

42 R-Q1 .... 

Or 42 F-Kt7, R-K£ch; 43 K-B2 (if 43 R-Ql f 
RxRch; 44 K-E2 f R(8)xP; 45 P-KtS(Q), RxFch; 

45 K-Ktl, R(4)-Q7 and wins or 45 K-Bl, R-B7 
and wins, R-B4chl 44 KQ3, RxPch followed 
by , . . R-B4ch and . . , P-Q4 winning. 

42 ... . R-K7 ! 

43 P-R3 R-B4! 

44 P-Kt7 .... 

The crucial variation would haye been 44 
R-QB1, R-Kt4M 45 RxR, PxR; 46 P-Kt7 (or 

46 R-B2, RxR; 47 KxR, B-QG; 48 P-KtT, B-R2 
etc.), R~Kt7 ch ; 47 KR1, P-Kt5!! 48 P-KtSfQ), 
R-Kt6ch; 49 K-R2, RxPch; 50 K-Ktl, P-Kt6I 
and wins! 

44 ... . R (4)-B7 [ 

45 R-K1 

Of course if 45 P-KtS(Q), R-QR7! wins. 

45 ... . R-Kt7ch 

46 RxR RxRch 

47 K-B1 RxP and wins 


Paris 1939 


Rossolimo 



Grob 


(White to move) 

White has not played the opening very well 
and his pieces are rather insecurely (although 
aggressively) posted. He therefore winds up 
with a neat drawing combination: 

1 B-B7 1 KtxB 

2 BxBch RxB 

3 RxR KxR 

4 CbB4ch K-Ktl 

How is White to save the piece?! 

5 KtxKt .... 

Not 5 QxKt?? BxKt and White has nothing. 

5 . . . . 8-Q3 

If 5 , . . BxKt; 6 R-KSch etc, 

6 Q-Kt4! BxKt 

If 6 , . . QxKt; 7 Q-K6ch, Q-B2 (or 7 , , . 
K-Rl ; 8 Q-K8eh); 8 QxB etc, 

7 Q-KGch K-R1 

& Kt-Kt6ch! Drawn 1 





June — July 194 0 


107 


Manhattan C. C, Championship 1939-1940 

Nadelt 



Rosenzweig 

(White to move) 


White played 35 F-Kt4? and resigned oil the 
69th move. Instead he had a forced win, as 
pointed out by Horowitz. Solution given on 
Page 120. 


Maroczy 70 Years Old 

On March 3rd, the Hungarian master Geza 
Maroczy celebrated his 70th birthday. Like 
Dr, Lasker, Maroczy is one of the grand old 
men of chess, and it is with a feeling of awe 
that one realizes the span of Maroczys career. 
He is the same player who beat our great 
Pillsbury so elegantly at Nuremberg, 1896, and 
who also defeated young Paul Keres convin- 
cingly in the Zandvoort, 1936 Tournament! 
Congratulations to this famous master, and 
many happy returns! 

Among the great tournaments in which Ma- 
roczy has participated are: Nuremberg 1896 
(second prize), Vienna 1898, London 1899 
(tied for second prize with Pillsbury and Jan- 
owski), Paris 1900 (tied for third prize with 
Marshall), Munich 1900 (tied for first prize 
with Pillsbury and Janowski, but lost the play- 
off), Monte Carlo 1902 (first prize, a quartet 
of a point ahead of Pillsbury!), Monte Carlo 
1903 (second prize), Ostende 1905 (first prize 
—a great achievement), Barmen 1905 (tied for 
first prize with Janowski), Ostende 1906 (sec- 
ond prize) , Carlsbad 1907 (second to Rubin- 
stein— one of the most magnificent tournaments 
of all time), Vienna 1908 (tied for first prize 
with Duras and Schlechter), Prague 1908, San 
Sebastian 191 1, Berlin 1920, Gothenburg 1920, 
London 1922, Carlsbad 1923 (tied for first 
prize with Alekhine and Bogolyubov!) ? New 
York 1924, Carlsbad 1929, San Remo 1930, 
Bled 1931™to mention only the most memor- 
able. 


Maroczy practically retired from serious chess 
in 1936, but his name still remains a byword 
for fine defensive play, which was the most 
notable feature of his style. From the em- 
barrassment of riches wdiich is available in 
the selection of a characteristic Maroczy game, 
we have preferred to select two little-known 
games in a lighter vein. 


(Sometimes the defense can he more forcing than 
the attack !} 

Nagy-Teteny 1857 
FRENCH DEFENSE 


(Notes by G. Maroczy) 


R. Gharousek 
White 

1 P-K4 

2 P-Q4 

3 Kt-QB3 

4 B-KtS 

5 BxKt 


G. Maroczy 

Black 

P-K3 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

B-K2 


This exchange is rarely played nowadays, 
as there is general unwillingness to relinquish 
the two Bs so early in the game. The text, 

however, allows White to inaugurate a promis- 
ing attack. Charousek was above all an at- 
tacking player who never let himself be 
influenced by dogmas. 


5 * , , . BxB 

6 P-K5 B-K2 

7 Q-Kt4 0-0 ‘ 

Both sides play to win: White attacks, and 
Black lets himself be attacked! 


8 B-Q3 

9 Q-R3 

10 PxP 

11 P-B4 

12 Kt-B3 


P-QB4 

P-KKt3 

Kt-B3 

BxP 

P-B31 


Black must seek counterbalances, and the 
text is his only opportunity. 


13 Q-R6 


Q-K13 was the alternative. 

13 ... , R-B2 

14 PxP . .... 

White hardly has anything better, for if 
14 0-0-0, BK6ch; 15 K-Ktl, PxP etc. But 
now Black obtains the upper hand and utilizes 
the unfavorable position of the hostile Q in 
skilful fashion. 


14 ... . QxP 

15 P-K Kt3 B-R6 ! 

If now 16 PxB, QxKtch; 17 K-K2, P-K4! etc. 

16 Kt-QI B-B1 

17 Q-R4 K t-Q 3 ! 

18 KtxKt QxKt 

19 Q-Kt5 B-Q2 

Both players have really only their Qs in 
play, but Black has a considerable advantage, 
as the movements of his opponent's pieces 
are greatly hampered. 

20 P-K R4 .... 


Attempting to strengthen the attack. 

20 , , . . B-K2 

21 Q-R6 P-K4I 



108 


The Chess Review 


The decisive move. The conclusion is rather 
amusing- 

22 P-FE5 P-K Kt4I 

Pretty play; White’s Q is now in acute dan- 
ger, and a loss of material unavoidable. 

23 B-Kt6 . . . . 


7 PxP 

8 Kt-Q4 

Black has obtained 

9 KtxBP 

10 KtxKt 

11 B-Kt5 


0-0 

PxP 

far the better game 

Q-Kt3 

RxKt 


23 PxP, B-KB1; 24 BxPch, KxB; 25 Q-Kt6ch. 
R-Kt2 is quite hopeless for White. 

23 ... . R-Kt2 

24 P*B3 Q-Kt3 

25 PxKtP Q-Q1 I 

The threatened . . . BxP must soon put an 
end to White’s resistance. The maneuver with 
the Q (■ . . Q-B3-Q5-Kt3-Q 1 ) forms the four 
sides oi L a square — a most unusual occurrence! 

26 B-B2 B-QB11 

i 

Maintaining the threat White could have 
dragged out the game for a while with BxPch, 
but he prefers to resign in this hopeless 
position. 


Maroczy 



Charousek 

(Quoted from Maroczy' s Hundred Best Games) 


(A ro in 'we sacrifice in an original form.) 

Played by Correspondence 1897-1898 

QUEEN'S PAWN COUNTER GAMBIT 

(Notjes by Cl. Maroczy) 

G* Maroczy 
Black 


K, Zambelly 
White 


1 P-K4 

2 Kt-KB3 

3 PxP 


P-K4 

P-Q4 

B-Q3 


In 

well 


3 


to 


. . QxF as 
be inferior 


Bdguer’s Handbuch both 
as 3 . . . P-K5 are shown 
in all variations. Hence [ adopted the text 
in order to ■'throw my opponent on his own 
resources. 


4 Kt-B3 

Stronger seems 4 P-Q4, PK6; 5 Kt-KS etc. 

4 , . . L Kt~KB3 

5 B-KtSch P-B3 

6 B-R4 

Inferior to 6 PxP, PxP; 7 B-Bl etc. 

6 , , , . P-K 5 


A necessary defensive move which prevents 
. . . B-R3 and makes B-K2 possible in response 
to . . . B-KKtG, U 0-0 would have been an- 
swered by . . . BxPch J ! 

11 ... . R Q1 [ 

The most energetic continuation, which in- 
directly prevents White from castling and 
hinders his development generally. White 
misses the point, at once obtaining a lost. game. 

12 0-0 .... 

Allowing a well-known sacrilicial continua- 
tion which leads to rather a piquant conclusion. 

12 .... BxPch 

13 KxB Kt-Kt5ch 

14 K-Kt3 

Or 14 K-Ktl , Q-KR3; 15 R-KR Q-R7ch; 16 
K-BR Q-RSch; 17 K-K2, QxP; 13 R-BR Kt-R7 
etc, 

14 ... . Q-B2c h 

- ■ . Q’Kt3 would also be quite good. 

15 P-B4 PxP e.p. ch 18 Kt*K4 BxKtch 

16 KxP R-Q5 1 19 KxKt Q-R71 

17 PhQ 3 B-Kt2ch 20 PxB QxPch 


M aroezy 



Zambelly 


21 K-R4 


RxB! 


Going straight for the mate! 


22 QxR 

23 KxR 

24 K-Kt5 

25 K-B4 

26 K-K3 


R-R4ch E 
Q-R6ch 
P-R3ch 
P-Kt4ch 
G-K3 mate 


(Quoted from Maroczy" s Hundred Best Games) 


On his return from New York, Weaver 
Adams gave a simultaneous exhibition in 
Springfield, winning IS games and losing to 
Bert Dygert of Springfield and Nathan Kahan 
of Holyoke. 





Modern Chess Dull?! 

By Fred Reinfeljd 


II 

I was very much interested in a recent inter- 
view with Ty Cobb, in which this famous base- 
ball player of a by-gone age deplored the rela- 
tively recent introduction of the lively ball, 
This innovation, Cobb says, did away with the 
old finesse and skill and fighting spirit of the 
old-time players. The reason for its intro- 
duction, however, is quite obvious: baseball 
fans (like chess players, or spectators at a 
public hanging) w r ant 'action/ 3 They evi- 
dently do not care for the fine points which 
are prized by a great player like Cobb. 

But what is so interesting about Cobb's re- 
marks is this: the introduction of the lively ball 
did for baseball exactly what the clamorous de- 
mands of many chess amateurs would do for 
chess if their recommendations were followed, 
namely barring all first moves but 1 P-K4, and 
raising the rime limit to some such figure as 
40 moves an hour* 

Such demands are based on a widespread 
underestimation of the skill of the modern 
masters and of the beauty of the games pro- 
duced by them. This, in turn, is based on a 
fantastic overestimation of the skill of the 
masters of the period 1820-1860 (which in 
the minds of many amateurs is the ' Golden 
Age 1 ' of chess) and of the beauty of the games 
produced in that period. Now most of us 
have seen very few of those games, and have 
only a dream-picture of the play of that period. 
In my previous article on this theme, I under- 
took to show how dull and slow the chess 
of this time really was. In the present article, 
I should like to consider this point in greater 
detail. Let us see first, fust what are the 
characteristics attributed to the period. 

THE “GOLDEN AGE" OF CHESS (1820-1360) 

I have often thought that the modern ama- 
teur’s pleasant vision of the old-time chess is 
admirably evoked in these lines from Thom- 
son's The Castle of Indolence : 

■ r A pleasing land of drowsy head it 
was, 

Of dreams that wave before the half - 
shin eye; 

And of gay castles in the clouds that 
pass 

Forever flushing round a summer 
sky; 

There eke the summer delights , that 
witchingly 


Instill a wanton sweetness through 
the heart, 

And the calm pleasures always hover'd 
nigh; 

But tv hat ever smack'd of * noyance or 
unrest \ 

Was far, far off expelled from this 
delicious nest” 

If we were not all too familiar with the 
infinite capacity of the human mind to create 
and perpetuate illusions, we would marvel at 
this superbly ironic state of affairs: this era, 
which in all its aspects was the most dreary 
the game has known, has been put down by 
well-nigh universal consent as the age of the 
most interesting chess, In this period, the 
thesis continues, chess reached such sublime 
heights that henceforth there could appear only 
decadence and imitation and sterility. This 
quaint belief involves certain subsidiary be- 
liefs to support the main structure: 

The Grand Old Masters revelled in the 
open game; as far as the eye could reach, one 
saw nothing but King's Gambits and Evans' 
Gam bits— "that most beautiful of openings" 
( Morphy) , 

Correspondingly, the close game was ana- 
thema, and those two monsters, the Sicilian 
and French Defenses (which only signify, after 
all, a cowardly evasion of the chivalrous gam- 
bits) were delightfully conspicuous by their 
absence. 

Daring attacking play, rich in imaginative 
resource, was of course the order of the day. 

Correspondingly, defensive play and man- 
euvering were virtually unknown — this of 
course being all to the good. 

As one would expect from this vogue of 
sparkling chess, games were short, rarely going 
beyond thirty moves; draws were few; and the 
actual duration of the game was brief. 

This is contrasted to modem games, in which 
according to popular belief, games are rarely 
less than thirty moves in length, draws are 
frequent and the actual duration of the game 
is tiresomely long. 

Alas for this century-old daydream, this 
charming gingerbread fantasy in the manner 
of the Brothers Grimm! 

As I have shown in the previous article, 
the tournament games of this period averaged 
at least 43 moves in length, which is a higher 


109 


no 


T he Chess R e view 


figure than in modern play. The actual dura- 
tion was certainly much higher than in the 
last fifty years (or in fact ever since the intro- 
duction of clocks) , Draws may have been 
relatively infrequent, but only because of the 
gross blunders which regularly cropped up 
even in the games of the best players. A good 
many of the draws in modern play are simply 
the result of the frequent impossibility of deci- 
sive action between well-matched opponents. 
Shall we deplore the strength of the modern 
players?! 

THE "JITTERBUGS” 

The Golden Age produced three great mas- 
ters who stand head and shoulders above the 
rest; Labour donnais, Morphy and Andcrssen. 
No matter what development chess may take, 
these great geniuses will always have a secure 
place in its Hall of Fame, To disparage them 
would be akin to belittling Bach, Mozart and 
Beethoven. But just as it would be foolish to 
put Mozart's contemporaries on the same level 
with him (wherein, then, would he be out- 
standing?!), so is it equally foolish to praise 
Morphy if we are going to give equal praise 
to the mediocrities who were so glaringly in- 
ferior to him. I divide these other players 
into the group which exaggerated the tendency 
to attack, the group which exaggerated the 
tendency to defend — and worse yet, the group 
which exaggerated the tendency to do nothing. 

1 call the first group the "Jitterbugs/ 1 Often 
gifted with fine natural talents, they forever 
concentrated on attack— in season and out of 
season; when it was indicated and when it was 
out of the question; with ample resources and 
with exiguous ones; when the attack looked 
promising, or when it offered no chance what- 
ever, Their simple views on defensive play 
could be summed up very aptly in Goethe's 
phrase: ' There is a limit to everything — 
except stupidity.’ 1 And their expectations of 
the defenders lack of foresight and patience 
were rarely proved incorrect. 

Another curious aspect of the attacking play 
of the Golden Age w r as that it was so often 
inconclusive: second-rate moves, if they were 
flashy enough, w r erc quite acceptable, The same 
attitude is never (or at all events, very rarely) 
found in the modern master, who prizes his 
artistic integrity too highly to content himself 
with 'good enough" moves when his instinct 
tells him that he may be able to find other 
moves which are just as sound but have the 


additional merits of greater elegance and greater 
conclusiveness. 

Careful study of the games of the Golden 
Age shows the following characteristics: 

The attacks are often hopelessly unsound. 
A modicum of care would easily repulse them 
with catastrophic loss of material; but generally 
the defense is even worse that the attack! 

When the attack deserves to succeed and is 
quite sound (that is to say, forcing) t this may 
generally be attributed to previous strategical 
blunders on the part of the loser- — mistakes 
of such magnitude that not even the highest 
defensive skill could hold together such wretch- 
edly compromised positions. 

Thus the conclusion is incontrovertible that 
the brilliant games of the modern masters must 
be rated much more highly than those of the 
Romantic School. The modern master must 
contend with far more formidable opponents 
and must work out his plans within a time 
limit; the older players generally had much 
weaker opponents and had unlimited time at 
their disposal (the belief that their offhand 
play was very rapid is not borne out by the 
facts). In addition, the modern games must 
conform to rigorous standards of soundness, 
economy and elegance; whereas the games of 
the Romantic School are spotted with daws. 
A spate of flimsy sacrifices is not to be con- 
fused with the highest flights of chess genius. 

I realize, of course, that much of the fore- 
going has a dogmatic ring to those who have 
not studied the games of the older players. I 
propose, therefore, to give some examples of 
the play of this period in next month s issue 
of The Chess Review , Jn the interests of 
fairness, I shall select only examples from the 
play of the outstanding masters, or from games 
that were highly praised at the time they were 
played. 'I here is little question that anyone 
who takes the trouble to familiarize himself 
with the games of the older players, will soon 
come to love the games of the moderns! 


"A NIGHT OF KNIGHTS” 

This is Milwaukee's description of the Wis- 
consin Junior Championship, o-pen to boys and 
girls under 17, to bo held on July 24 at Mar- 
quette University Stadium. Last year there 
wore 790 participants, with 5000 spectators. 
This year, the event will be held at night, and 
2000 participants plus 10,000 spectators (!!!) 
are expected. The whole affair will be handled 
in the grand manner, with two bands, tumblers, 
dancers, acrobats, choruses, tableaux . . + and 
free admission I 


June — July l 9 4 o 


ill 


Game Studies 

( A little psychology goes a long way.) 
U.S*S,R, Championship 1939 
SICILIAN DEFENSE 


(Notes by V* Ragosm) 


.evenfish 

E. Rabinovich 

White 

Black 

1 P-K4 

P-QB4 

2 Kt-KB3 

P-Q3 

3 P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

4 KLB3 

PxP 

5 KtxP 

P^KKtS 

6 P-B4 



A psychological move! Levenfish and other 
masters have frequently expressed the opinion 
that Rabinovich dislikes sharp openings. No 
one knows, of course, whether or not this Is 
true, but the energetic text has the desired 
effect in this game, and Black blunders* 

6 . , , , B-Kt2 

Weak, After 6 . * . Kt-BS Black would have 
nothing to fear, 

7 P*K5 

Consistent with White's plan. After 7 B-K2, 
O-O; & B-K$, Kt-BZ; 9 O-O, Q-Kt3 ! we would 
have a transposition into a well-known line* 

7 * « , * Kt-Kt5 

If 7 , . . Rt.-R4 ; 8 B-Kt5ch (better than 8 
B-K2, KtxP; 9 BxKt, PxP etc.), B-Q2; 9 PxP 
with obvious advantage. 


Rabinovich 



Levenflsh 


8 B-Kt5ch! * . . . 

Underlining the unsatisfactory position of 
Black's KKt. He is compelled to move his 
K, which gives rise to new complications* 

8 * * , * K-Bl 

9 P-KR3 KLKR3 

10 B-K3 Kt-B3 

Neither 9 or 10 * . . PxP?? was possible be- 
cause of Kt-KGoh. White has taken advantage 
of this possibility to complete his development. 
With the text Black offers a P in order to 
secure conn ter play : 11 KtxKt* PxKt; 12 BxBP, 
QR-Rtl etc. 

11 PxP , . « , 

Forcing advantageous simplification. 


11 . . . . KtxKt 

12 BxKt 

12 PxPch? would of course lose a piece. 

12 . . * . QxP 

13 BxBch KxB 

14 QxQ PxQ 

15 0-0-0 


White’s experimental opening has ended suc- 
cessfully. In addition to his advantage in 
space, he must win a P. 


15 , * . , 

R-Q1 

16 R-Q2 

B-K3 

17 KR-Q1 

Kt-B4 

18 P-KK14 

Kt-K6 

19 R-K1 

P-QR3 

Likewise after 19 . . . Kt-B5; 20 BxKt (20 

RxB? would leave White the exchange down 

after 20 . . . KtxR; 21 R-K3, 

P-Q4 ! ) . BxB; 21 

R-K7 White would win a P* 

20 RxKt 

PxB 

21 KtxP 

RxP 

22 RxP 

RxR 

23 KtxR 

R-RSch 

24 K-Q2 

R-KB8 

Attempting to save the QKtP might be even 

worse, e,g, 24 . , , B-Q4; 25 

P-B4, B-Kt7; 26 

R-K7 etc. 

25 KtxKtP 

RxP 

26 Kt-B5 

B-Q4 

27 Kt-Q3 

R-B3 

28 P-Kt3 

■ l! Il ■ 

White now proceeds to realize his material 

superiority* 

k 

28 * * * * 

K-R3 

29 P-B4 

B-Kt7 

30 K-K2I 

f R T P 

By moving the K to his weak flank, White 

deprives his opponent Of all 

counterplay* 

30 . . * , 

R-QKt8 

31 P-Kt5ch! 

K-Kt2 

Forced* 

32 K-B2 

B»Kt2 

33 P-Kt4 

B-B1 

34 P-B5 

P ■ ■ 41 

The two passed Ps are so 

strong that they 

do not need the assistance of the K* 

34 ... . 

B*B4 

35 P-B6 

P-R3 

(If 35 . . . BxKt; 36 RxB, 

RxP; 37 R-QB3, 

R-Ktl ; 38 K-K3, K-Bl: 39 

K-Q4, K-K2; 40 

K-B5 wins — Ed,) 

36 PxPch 

KxP 

37 P-B7 

R-Kt6 

38 P-R4 

R-B6 

39 Kt-B5 

R-B5 

40 R-K5 

B*Kt5 

41 R-K4 

■ I R V- 

Another way was 41 P-Kt5, 

R-Kt5; 42 Kt-K6J 

41 , , , * 

R-B7ch 

42 K-K3 

B-B4 

43 R-KB4 

B-B1 

44 RxP 

R-B5 

45 R-B4 

Resigns 



112 


The Chess Review 


This will come to be known as the immortal 
ninth game . 

Match 1939-1940 


(9th game) 
INDIAN DEFENSE 


{Notes by Fred Reinfeld) 


Dr, M, Euwe 
White 

T P-Q4 K1-KB3 

2 P-QB4 P-K3 

3 Kt-KB3 P-QK13 

4 P*KKt3 B*Kt2 

9 QxKt 


P, Keres 
Black 

5 B-Kt2 B-K2 

6 0-0 0-0 

7 Kt.B3 Kt-K5 

8 Q-B2 KtxKt 

P-Q3 


* . . B-K5 has also been played here, although 
it seems? to lack point because of the indicated 
reply 10 Kt-Kl. 

10 Q-B2 P-KB4 

Guarding against White's tactical threat, of 
Kt-Kl5 and his strategical threat of F-K4, 

11 Kt-Kl 

The logical continuation, He neutralizes the 
influence of the hostile QB so as to be able 
to advance P-K4, which should bring to light 
weaknesses in Black's center. 


11 .... Q-B1 ! 

An improvement on the customary 11 , , . 
BxB; 12 KtxB which gains time for White by 
assisting his Kt to a useful square and facil- 
itating the communication of his Rs. After 
the text, this is not so easy to achieve. 

12 P-K4 Kt-Q2 

Relatively best, since after 12 . . . PxP; 13 
BxP, BxB; 14 QxB, Kt-R3 ; 15 P-B4 Blacks 
Kt is poorly placed, his KP is backward and 
White's Q lias a commanding position. 

13 P-Q5 

Despite the promising appearance of this 
move and its strategical desirability (if 13 . . . 
P-K4; 14 P-B4! with a flue game) its effect 
is nullified by the fact that Black has more 
pieces in play. Better was 13 PxP, PxP; 14 
Kt-Q3, B-KB3; 15 P-Q5 and Black will be con- 
fronted with serious difficulties in guarding 
his K3 adequately, especially since it is an 
open file. 

13 , , . , B PxP 1 

But now this move is quite good, as Black's 
pieces soon become active. 

14 QxP 

If 14 BxP, Kt-B3 and White's QP is very 
weak. Or 14 PxP, Kt-B4“ 15 P-QKti f KtxP; 16 


BxP (16 B KR3, B-KB3 followed by , , . Q-Kl 
leaves Black with a P ahead and an excellent 
game), BxB; 17 QxB, B-B3 and Black's position 
is quite satisfactory, 

14 . . , , Kt-B4 

15 Q-K2 .... 

After Q-B2 (which would be answered in 
the same way) White's Q would be more se- 
cure, but the pressure on the KP would be 
slighter. The text, on the other hand, has 
the drawback of exposing the Q to attack, 

15 ... . B-KB3! 

It is clear that after 15 * . , P-K4; 16 P- 
QKt4 White would have the initiative. Yet. 
the text required considerable calculation, be- 
cause the following pinning maneuver promises 
to be very troublesome, 

16 B-R3 .... 

This has been criticised as being “too" logi- 
cal; 16 PxP, BxB; 17 KtxB, KtxP; 18 B-K3 
is safer, but not inviting from the standpoint 
of striving for tJhe initiative. 

16 . * . . R-K1 

Actually threatening , . . PxP I 

17 B-K3 .... 

Parrying this last threat, and in turn menac- 
ing the win of the exchange by BxKt followed 
by BxPch. 

17 ... . Q-Q1 ! 

A tricky reply. 

18 BxKt PxP 

19 B-K6ch? .... 

White’s consistency spells his downfall. 
Kmoch recommends 19 B-K3, P-Q5; 20 R-Kt2, 
BxB; 21 KtxB, PxB; 22 KtxB, B-Q5; 23 Q-Q2, 
BxKt; 24 PxB and White's P weakness is not 
fatal. One must admit that such an alter- 
native must appear distasteful in the heat of 
the battle. 

19 ... . K-R1 

20 R-Q1 .... 

If 20 PxP, BxQP; or 20 B-QR3, Q-K2; 21 
PxP, BxQP and Black wins in either event. 

20 ... . QPxB 

The alternative 20 . . . KtPxB; 21 PxP, 
BxQP; 22 RxB, Q-K2 has been recommended 
as simpler. However, Keres must have had 
some doubts as to the value of the doubled 
QEP— a factor which would be admittedly diffi- 
cult to estimate. 

21 Kt- Kt2 .... 

Again if 21 PxP, BxQP! 22 RxB, Q-K2I 
wins. There is a mordant irony in the way 


Greenwich Village f |j ■ ■ y | p yi # Rendezvous of 

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Where Chessplayers Find a Friendly Club-like Atmosphere 
WINES * BEERS • LIQUORS 
Excellent Cuisine ........ Dinners 65c — $1.00 

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Experts 1 Night Every Monday 

86 Bedford Street, N, Y, C. 1 block off 7th Ave. at Barrow St. 

Telephone CH 2-9512 Christopher St. 1 RT subway station 


June — July 1940 


113 


that the pin has switched from White to 
Black. 

21 P-Q5 

22 P-B4? 

Evidently Intending to support the B with 
P-B5, but this proves faulty, If, however, 22 
Q-Kt4, Q-Q3; 23 B-B5, P-Kt3 followed 'by doubl- 
ing the Rs on the K hie and Black wins in due 
course, 

22 ... . P-Q6II 

Beginning a magnificent combination which 
is evidently inspired by the wish to stir up 
complications as long as White's B “hangs/’ 


Keres 



Dr. Euwe 


23 RxP QxR ! ! 

24 QxQ B-Q5ch 

The foregoing sacrifice Is justified, as will be 
seen, by the superb cooperation of Black's 
remaining pieces. Thus, if now £5 K-Rl, RxB 
and there is nothing that White can do about 
Black's contemplated . . . QR-K1 followed by 
. . . R-K7. Or if 25 Kt-K3, RxB; 26 R-Kl, 
QR-K1 and wins. 

25 R-B2 RxB 

26 K-B1 QR-K1! 

Played in the grand manner. Black's pieces 
are so much more effective than those of his 
opponent that he avoids exchanges. 

27 P-B5 

If at once £7 R-Q2, B-K5; 28 Q-Kt3, E-Bl 
followed by B-R6 with a winning position. 

27 ... . R-K4 

28 P-B6 , . , , 

To prevent Black from later utilizing the 
KB file, If instead 28 R-E4, R-K7 wins easily. 

28 . , , . PxP 

29 R-Q2 B-BH 

Threatening 30 , , . B-R6; 31 R-Ql (else . . , 
R-K8 mate), R-B4ch etc. 

30 Kt- B4 .... 

Preventing the inroad of the QB, but now 
the catastrophe arrives in another form. 

30 ... . R-K6! 

31 Q-Ktl 

If 31 Q-B2, R-K3ch; 32 K-Kt2, R-Kt8ch; 33 
K-B3, R-K6 mate. 

31 ... . R - B 6 ch 

32 K-K12 RxKt! 

A sparkling finish. 


33 PxR, R-Ktlch 

34 K-B3 B-Kt5ch 

White resigns, for if the K goes to the Kt 
file . . . B 134 wins, If 35 K-K4, R-Klch and 
Black mates with the QB, What Bs! 


Book Review 

THE KERES-EUWE MATCH 

Edited by Dr. A, Buschke $.75 

A limited edition, neatly mimeographed, con- 
taining all the 14 games, There are notes 
from various European sources, with two of 
the games (the fifth and ninth) interestingly 
annotated by Dr, Emanuel Lasker. The dia- 
grams are nicely reproduced by photo-offset, 
the whole making an attractive record of this 
notable match. ~F.R. 


PENNSYLVANIA CHAMPIONSHIP 

This year's title has been annexed by J, J, 
Leary with the fine score of 7-1, ahead of W. 
A. Ruth and Barney Winkelman, both 5-2, 
Here is the deciding game : 

FRENCH DEFENSE 


J. J. Leary W. A. Ruth 

White Black 


1 P-K4 

P-K3 

18 B-Q2 

Q-B3 

2 P-Q4 

P-Q4 

19 Q-K4 

PxP 

3 Kt-Q2 

PxP 

20 PxP 

R-QKtl 

4 KtxP 

KUKB3 

21 B-QB4 

B-R3 

5 KtxKtch 

QxKt 

22 B-Kt3 

R-Kt4 

6 Kt-B3 

P-KR3 

23 R-QB1 

B-R4 

7 B-K3 

Kt-Q2 

24 BxB 

RxB 

8 Q-Q2 

B-Q3 

25 BxKt 

PxB 

9 Q-CMD 

P-B3 

25 Q-Q4 

K-K2 

10 B-K2 

P-QKt.3 

27 Kt-K5 

R-QB1 

11 P-B4 

B-Kt2 

28 P-B6 

K-K1 

12 P-B5 

B-B2 

29 KR-Ktl 

Q-B4ch 

13 K-Ktl 

R-Q1 

30 K-R1 

Q-K5 

14 Q-B2 

Q-K2 

31 R-Kt8ch 

K-K2 

15 P-KKt4 

KLB3 

32 QxPch 

K-B3 

16 P-Kt5 

Kt-Q4 

33 Kt-Kt4ch 

Resigns 

17 PxRP 

PxRP 




TEXAS CORRESPONDENCE CHAMPIONSHIP 

The title ihas been won by J, G. Murphy of 
San Antonio with, a score of 9*A — 2%. Second 
and third places will go to Dr, R, S. Under- 
wood (Lubbock), w T ht> has 7 — 4 with one game 
unfinished, and John A, White (Gpelousa, La,) 
with 7 y % — 4 \ f 2 . The Glass A title fell to 0, L. 
Brantley (Dallas) with 7—1. 


WEST VIRGINIA CHAMPIONSHIP 

W. F. Hartling proved victorious in the sec- 
ond Annual West Virginia Championship, with 
3 — 0, Runner-up was Arthur S. Maloy, £ — 1. 
The Consolation Tournament w T as won by E. 
M + Foy t 2^— 1£. The Class A title fell to W, 
Crede, 3 — D, 



Problem Department 

By Vincent L. Eaton 

Address all correspondence relating to this department to V,L, Eaton , 2237 Q Street, NAV*, Washington, D.C. 
Questions About Problem Matters Will Be Answered If Accompanied By Return Postage, 


EXPLANATION OF TERMS IN 
MR. WHITE'S ARTICLE 

In the solution of a problem, White's first 
move Is called the key. if by the key White 
creates a possible mating move which will be 
effective unless Black deliberately tries to stop 
it, this mating move is called the threat, If 
Black makes a move that will prevent the 
threat from being effective, his reply is called 
a defense. Other terms are: 

Battery, Two White pieces placed in line 
with the Black King so that one may move 
and discover check from the other. In No. 
1618 the White Queen aS and White Knight 
(15 form a battery because the latter can move 
and discover check from the Queen, 

Cross-check. A situation in which a Black 
piece checks the White King and White re* 
plies by interposing one of his own pieces. 

Flight-square. A square to which the Black 
King can move in the course of the solution, 
such as g3, gl, f2, or h2 In No, 1618. 

Half-pin. A situation in which two pieces 
of the same color are so placed that when one 
of them moves, the other is pinned. 

Interference, This occurs when one piece 
moves onto -a line controlled by another and 
thus curtails the latter's movement along that 
line. Thus, in No, 1623, the move 1 . , , Be5 
interferes with the Black Queen's control of 
the square e3, allowing 2 Ke2 mate. It also 
interferes with the White Bishop’s guard of 
d4. 

Lightweight. A problem with a smaller 
number of pieces compared with those in the 
general average of problems. (Most two-movers 
have sixteen or more. A miniature Is a prob- 
lem with seven pieces or less; a Meredith has 
twelve or less,) 

Self-block. A move by a Black piece to a 
square immediately adjacent to the Black King, 
which allows a White piece that had previ- 
ously guarded that square to move away be- 
cause the Black king's escape via that square 
has thereby become blocked; or & move by a 
Black piece to one of the Black king's flight- 
squares, preventing escape. Thus, in No. 1625, 
the move 1 , . . Se6 blocks the square eG and 
allows 2 R<17 mate. 

Theme* Strictly speaking, the central idea 
of a problem. The term lis also used generally 
to indicate groups of ideas that can be il- 
lustrated In various ways in individual prob- 
lems. 

Unpin, Releasing a piece from a state of 
pin. In No. 1622, for instance, the move 1 , . . 
£>c£ unpins the White Pawn at d2, allowing 2 
Pd3 mate. 

Variation, A line of play that allows a mate 
by White distinct from the threat; or, in a 
problem without threat, any line of play that 
allows a distinct mate by White. 

* * ^ * # 

Congratulations to Dr. J, Hansen, whose No. 
1551 wins the quarterly two- move Honor Prize. 


Next month's Problem Section will combine 
two months' Solutions and Ladder. 


In order that solvers may take full advan- 
tage of Mr. Alain C, White's historical review 
of the two-mover, which continues below, we 
are devoting all our diagrams to it. Solutions 
to these eighteen problems will be scored as 
usual on the Solvers' Ladder. The omission 
of longer offerings for this one issue will, I 
hope, give you a little “summer vacation" 
and make it easier for you to get solutions in 
on time while the Review is getting back to its 
normal publication schedule. 

As indicated in the last issue, the initials 
“G," “M/* and “W" above each problem in- 
dicate that it was selected by Messrs. Gam-age, 
Mansfield, or White, respectively. So that 
everyone may clearly understand the text and 
be able to study the problems with care, I 
have appended a brief glossary of the technical 
terms used in the article, 

t n 4 ^ 

SIXTY TWO-MOVERS OF THE 
PAST SIXTY YEARS 
Part II 

By Alain C. White 

The four periods of composition outlined in 
the previous installment stand out, in retro- 
spect, through the highlights of each, which 
focus our attention on the whole scene in per- 
spective, making it appear very different from 
the way we saw it while it was unfolding 
slowly about us. Each period contained not 
only the problems we now consider as having 
been specially typical of the times, but many 
more problems which were just a repetition 
of what had been typical in times past, and 
a few which were decidedly ahead of their 
time but in t)he main passed unnoticed or else 
weie acclaimed from quite a different point- 
of-view from that in which we appraise them 
today. 

At the beginning of our first period Interest 
centered on flight square play or the simple 
interplay of a few Black pieces and their 
numerically superior White antagonists. The 
earliest problems I remember seem rather 
monotonous today, with an occasional position 
having more striking theme appeal. I well 
recall the thrill which captured my imagina- 
tion the day I solved No. 1618, a problem 
composed just prior to the period we are re- 
viewing, Studying the position, one notes that 
there is no threatened mate, but that Black 
moves his King at random and that each of 
his moves permits an ingenious battery mate. 

Where composers introduced an active Black 
force, the results now often seem to be singu- 
larly heavy. No. 1619 was considered a very 
fine piece of work, yet today it is noticeably 
absent from Mansfield's selection (made with 
an eye to all-around merit) and from Gamage’s 
{made from the point-of-view of construction). 


115 


116 


The Chess Review 


The defenses are well-balanced and rather 
numerous, and they include two interferences 
and four self-blocks. The mates follow as a 
matter of course. Half a century ago all this 
was still sufficiently new and most engaging. 
To the player-problemist, flight-square moves, 
self-blocks, and interferences by Clack were 
still very stimulating; and beyond them alb in 
the uncertain haze which wag the future, one 
could sense the development of still other 
combinations of moves. There was tJhe unpin- 
ning of White by Black’s defenses, illustrated 
in no less than four variations of No. 1620; and 
there were the cross-checks, to be brought 
forward as thematic material for prise -winning 
problems by MacKenzie just at the close of the 
century. No one had yet envisioned the great 
possibilities of the half -pin. 

Especially interesting to us are the early 
efforts to understand the possibilities of a 
simultaneous Interference of Black and White, 
effected either by a White or a Black move. 
There is a brilliant example in No. 1621, which 
dates like No. 1618 from just prior to our 
period. This problem contains m key and 
main-play {after 1 . . . RxB) a direct fourfold 
interference of Black by White. But there is a 
very thematic try by 1 Rg5* RxB; 2 Sf6, in 
which the fourfold shut off of the real solution 
is converted into a fivefold shutoff, including 
that of White's Bishop at g7, so that the Black 
King escapes easily at c3. Here Is a double 
kind of action, White hampering himself while 
trying to hamper the adversary, a sort of com- 
pensating move that brings advantage and dis- 
advantage at the same time. 

Or 'let us turn to No. 1622. This famous 
two-mover has no threat, but any move of the 
S at h5 seems to allow 2 Sf6, A contingent 
threat of this character is always interesting, 
provided that there is some thematic defense 
that defeats it. In No. 1622, if Black plays 1 
, , , Sg3 and White tries to respond with his 
contingent threat 2 Sf6, if will be seen that 
the original threefold quard on f4 has been 
annulled and the Black King will escape to 
that square. So another mating move must 
be looked for. The mate is not easy to find, 
even today: one must foresee that Black's 
defense 1 . . . Sg3, which defeats White's 
contingent threat, will also Interfere with the 
defensive power of the Black Queen, 

Another charming early example of com- 
pensating simultaneous interference of White 
and .Black by Black occurs In No, 1623. This 
is a threat problem and it would seem that 
Black's defenses, 1 . . . Be3 and 1 , . . Be5 y 
w ah id both have the same effect of Inter- 
fering with the Black Queen, permitting the 

same mate in each case. It is not until one 
observes that l , , , Be5 interferes with the 
guard of di by the White Bishop at h8 as 
well as with the Black Queen, that one dis- 
covers how these two defenses lead to separate 
mates. This strategy does not directly deter- 
mine the key, as was the case in No. 1622, 
but an understanding of the combination is 
required before one can fully savor Die charm 
of the position. 

During the next period in the story of the 
two-mover — from 1901 to 1915 — composers 
turned to a considerable extent to a study of 
the maximum powers of the individual men In 


their application to the themes which the 
nineteenth century had revealed, and it is 
gratifying to find that some of these task 
problems are still counted as among the best 
works of their time. Examples are No. 1625, 
illustrating defenses and interferences by the 
Black Knight; No. 1626, showing unpinning of 
different White pieces; and No. 1627, with 
Its eightfold sacrificial key. No, 1625 may be 
compared with a later example, No. 1633. 
Needless to say, this period also used the 
themes discovered in the nineteenth century 
in less extreme forms, with many charming 
results, such as Gamage's delightful lightweight 
dealing with the unpinning of a White Rook 
battery {No, 1628) and his study in interference 
of a pinned Black Queen (No. 1629). Very 
attractive also are the cross-checks in No, 
1630. 

Between 1915 and 1920 there appeared an 
entire new generation of problemists, guided 
in part by the activities of James F, Magee 
Jr.'s Good Companion Club, Among them were 
Mansfield and Guidelli, Ellerman and Mari, 
to name only a few of the most outstanding. 
These composers carried forward the often 
crude beginnings of the first period in startling 
fashion and developed powers of composition 
that gave the laborious studies of the second 
period new meaning and a quite unsuspected 
new direction. The cross-check, for instance, 
blossomed out from the experiments of Mac- 
Kenzie into masterpieces such as Nos, 1631 
and 1632; Interferences came to provide ever 
new gems, as witnessed in No, 1633; unpins 
continued in popularity, with many admirable 
problems, of which I recall Schiffmann's No. 
1634 with special relish; while the half-pins, 
last comers of all, ultimately became top favor- 
ites, with a long line of brilliant examples, 
among which No. 1635 remains one of the 
great classics. 

(To be continued) 


INFORMAL LADDER 
(March Problems) 

(Maximum score for Nos, 1546-1563: 52) 
W. O, Jens 890, 43; T. McKenna 853, 44; *W. 
Patz 815, 37; L. Rothenberg 752, 46; 

*J, Hannus 697, 34; K. Lay 603, 36; A, Tauber 
588, 47; G, Fairley 627, 16; *1. Bursts in 656, 38; 
****Dr. G. Dobbs 482, 49; A, A. J, Grant 469, 
40; J. M, Dennison 472, 36 (correction in your 
last two-er noted); Dr. M. Herzberger 500; 

B, M. Marshall 425, 18 (many thanks for the 
selections; will try to use them shortly); Dr, 
W. F, Sheldon 423; P. A, Swart 351, 41; 

6- Datv 314. 41: ^Dr, P. G. Keene v fthe orioi* 
nals were most welcome) 306, 46; I, Sapir 

328; E, Popper 199, 40; R, Neff 205, 41 (De- 
cember solutions credited); *E, Korpanty 186, 
46; J, Donaldson 172, 46; Plowman 159, 

46; A. Fortier 162, 35; S. P, Shepard 142, 34; 
**I. Rivise 106, 44; C, E. Winnberg 101, 42; 
W, C. Dod 75, 40; B, L. Fader 63, 46; A. B. 
Hodges 57, 46; ^A. Sheftel 35, 43; J. Hudson 
23, 38; A. D. Gibbs 36, 40; J. Du bin 22 , 26; 

C, Lawrence 42 (welcome); T. Lundberg 36 
(welcome); W. R. Ellis 36 (welcome); R. W. 
Hays 14, 15; F, Grote 28; T. L. Goddard 24; 
**F. Sprenger — „ 

Hearty congratulations to W. O. Jens, winner 
of the monthly Ladder competition, and to 


June — July 1940 


117 


No, 11318 (W) 

w t A. SHIN KM AN 
First Prize, “Lebanon Herald,” 

1877 



Mate In 2 


No. 1619 (W) 

A. F. MacKENZlE 
First Prize, “Mirror of 
American Sports,” 1886 



Mate in 2 


No. 1620 (W) 

OTTO WURZBURG 
“Philadelphia Telephone/' 1892 



Mate in 2 


Quoted Section 


No. 1621 (W) 

SAM LOYD 
First Prize, American 
Problem Association, 1878. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1622 (M, W) 

T. TAVERNER 
First Prize, “Pen and Pencil,” 
1890, 


§11 IS 

■ i 

HI Ht 1 

18 i III 

n?§|§ §1 

lj| i jjjjf 

®fp] 


IS B 

11 mil 




Mate in 2 


No. 1623 (W) 

H. and E. BETTMANN 
Second Prize, “Nashvifle 
American,” 1887 



.Mate in 2 


No. 1.624 (W) 

W. MEREDITH 

“Dubuque Chess Journal,” 1886, 


m ■ 


Vj u 

J*|» 

®a®i 


1 

■ ■ 


Mate in 2 


No, 1625 (G, M) 

G. HEATHCOTE 
First Prize, “Hampstead and 
Highgate Express,” 1905. 



Mate in 2 


No, 1626 (M) 

_ G, HEATHCOTE 
First Prize, “Norwich 
Mercury,” 1907 



Mate in 2 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS DUE AUGUST 15th T 1940 














1 X 8 


The Chess Review 


Quoted Section (confd) 


No. 1627 <M) 

A. MOSELY 

First Frize, “Northern Whig,” 
1912. 




Mate ill 2 


No. 1628 (G, M) 

F. GAMAGE 

First Prize, “Tidskrift for 
Schack/' 1914. 



Mate ib 2 


No. 1629 CW) 

F. GAMAGE 

First Prize, “TEdskrift for 
Schack,” 1911. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1680 <M) 

G. F, ANDERSON 
(Ca. 1915) 



Mate in 2 


No, 1631 (C, M, W) 

C. MANSFIELD 
First Prize, Good 
Companions, 1917. 



^■jg 




Mate in 2 


No. 1632- (G) 

C* MANSFIELD 
First Prize, Queensland 
Chess Association, 1919. 



A® 

i H liw 

j§ El 

®"|I 



Mate In 2 


No. 1633 (M) 

A. MARI 
“Secola,” 1921. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1.634 (W) 

J* A. SCHIFFMANN 
Second Prize, “Bristol Times 
and Mirror,” 1927. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1635 <M) 

C. MANSFIELD 
First Prize, “EE Ajedrez 
Argentine,” 1926. 



Mate in 2 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS DUE AUGUST 15th, 1940 













June — July 1940 


119 


Aurel Tauber, who takes the quarterly prize 
for long-range problems with hie popular Rook- 
tour, No, 1532. 


CHRISTMAS SOLVING CONTEST 


The Informal solving contest based on Prob- 
lems Nos. 1510-151S seems to have been a big 
success, judging from the number of sets of 
solutions received. Two of the long-range tasks 
— 1515 and 1516 — turned out to be cooked in 
various ways, and the choice of the "'champion 
solver” resolved itself into a question of finding 
who had scored best on these problems, since 
most of the entrants mastered the other dia- 
grams. It is curious that no one sent an a 
perfect set, with the briefest solutions both to 

1515 and 1516. Best try was made by Isaac 
Kashdan* who solved 1515 in eleven moves and 

1516 in ten. He was also one of the speediest; 
in fact, his set of solutions was the third to 
be received, First prize, and our sincere con- 
gratulations, therefore go to him. Walter 
Jacobs, former Editor of these pages, receives 
second prize, and our felicitations, which have 
a slightly less negotiable value, “Honorable 
Mention” must be given to V, Rosado, Aurel 
Tauber, Geoffrey Mott- Smith, and Emil Popper. 
And our thanks go to all composers and solvers 
who helped make this one of the most enter- 
taining competitions in years. 

The solutions are: 


No, 1510 


No. 1511 


No. 1512 


No. 1513 


No. 1514 


No. 1515 


No. 1516 


No. 3517 


by the Problem Editor: 

V Pb8 (S), Rafich; 2 SxE, 1 , . . Pc4: 2 
Se*L The entire point of the key lies in 
preventing potential pin by 2 , . , Qc5, 
by the Problem Editor: 

1 Ph8 (R), Pg5; 2 Rh7. Here the task lies 
in a promotion which occupies a square 
only to vacate it immediately to give 
room for another piece. 

by Claude Du Beau: 

1 Rod. Kxdt; 2 Kxe2; 3 Sd7. 1 . , . Kxf4; 

2 Kxe2; 3 SH. 1 . . . Pc5; 2 Sd5ch. 1 . . . 
Pg5: 2 Sfach. Good key and elegant 
double set of echoes: too bad one set 
produces short mates— Rosado. 

by the Problem Editor: 

1 Kg8, Bc4ch; 2 Kf:$, Bfl ; 3 Ke3. Bb5ch; 
^Kd8. Bfl; 5 KcS, Ba6ch; 6 KbS, Bfl; 7 
K& 8, 


by G. Goeller: 

1 Pda (S), Bg7; 2 Qg6ch, ECS; 3 Sxg5; 4 
O-O-O; 5 Bbl; 6 Pd3; 7 Sd2; B Fa3, Pb2 
mate. If 1 , , , BfS; 2 Qg6ch, BdG; 3 Pa3; 
4 0-0: 5 Ehl; 6 Pf3 r 7 B(2; S Waiting 
move, Ph2 mate. An intricate piece of 
work involving near-echo lines with al- 
ternate Castling on either side of the 
boa rd. 

by F. W. Watson: 

Cooked in 10 by Is Kg2; 2 Qa5: 3 Kfl; A 
Qal ; 5 Sd3; 6 Belch: 7 Sb4; 8 Kel ; 9 
Qxc2eh; 10 Sa6. BxQ mate. There are 
several other cooks alon# the same gen- 
eral lines. The full fifteen -move solution 
was: 1 Qa5; % Qb4; 3 Qh4: 4 Sb3ch; 5 Qd4 
eh: 6 Bel; 7 Qg4; 8 Kg2; 0 Qc4; 10 Sd4; 11 
Kfl! 12 Kel; 13 Qb3ch; 14 Sxc2; 15 QxBeh. 
by P, L. Rothenberg; 

Cooked in 10 by 1 PhS(Q); 2 QfS; 3 KdS; 

4 Ke3: 5 Se4; 6 Qblch, Kg2; 7 Qf2ch, Kh3; 

5 Qd3* KxS; 9 Qd3-e2 ch, Kh3; 10 Kf2, 
Pg4 mate. There are other solutions in 
various lengths. Solvers are advised to 
play over the author's delightful inten- 
tion, which involves a chase of the Black 
King over the rim of the board. It runs: 
1 KdS: 2 Qh2ch: 3 Ke$; 4 Qf2chr 5 Kf7: 6 
Qe2; 7 Sd3; 8 Qdlch: 9 KgS: 10 Qbl; 11 
Qb2; 12 Qb4ch: 18 ScSch; 14 Qa&ch; 15 
KhS; 16 Qa7; 37 Qb7; 18 Qo7; 19 Sb7 or 
Set; 20 SdGch; 21 Qxg7ch, BxQ mate, 
by P, L, Ro then berg ; 

1 Ge5. Gxffi; 2 Gcleh, Sc3ch; 3 KaU FxP; 
4 Gc5-b2, PxG mate. 


No. 


151S by P. L. Rothenberg: 

1 GeO-cS, Gh8-bS; 2 Gd6-aO r GbS-Jf4; 3 Kf3, 
G14-C4; 4 Gh7-h4. 


SOLUTIONS (March Problems) 

No. 1546 by Waller B. Sues man: 1 QgG (Two 

points) 

Has a neat mirror mate*— Patz, A 
“feather-weight’ 1 model— Marshall, Three 
flights avail Black nothing in this fine 
miniature— Gibbs. Clever miniature — 
Shepard, This and 1547 are truly de- 
lectable minnles with pointed tries — Roth- 
enberg. 

No. 1547 by Walter B, Suesman: 1 Kgl (Two 

points) 

Complete block with nothing to do — 
Marshall. Quiet key smokes out the 
focalized Black Rook — Gibbs. Good key, 
exploding the set dual after 1 . . . Rdl 
— Fairley. 

No. 1548 by Edward L. Deiss: 1 Qg8 (Two points) 
Both set crossmates disrupted by the key. 
Fine — Rolhenberg. Has several good 

tries, with crosschecks the best feature 
- — Patz, The double change is noteworthy 
—Dobbs. Admirable key introduces two 
changed mates of merit — Gibbs. 

No. 1549 by G, Fairley: No solution (Two points) 

Intended I Qd4, but both the composer 
and editor overlooked the rather obvious 
1 . . . Rxc4, 

No. 1550 by F, Gam age: 1 Rei (Two points) 

Lovely 6-spoke Knight wheel, with cooks 
neatly averted — Ro then berg. Very clever 
“-Keeney. The unprovided check points 
to the key-piece* but the self blocks are 
fine — Dobbs. Unexpected waiting key, 
splendid variations featuring White self- 
interference and Black self blocks, fin- 
ished construction, and the oust canary 
Gamage accuracy — Gibbs. 

No. 1551 by Dr, J. Hansen: l 1 Re3-e4 (Two points) 
Black self-interference allowing White 
shutoffs in three lines — Gibbs, Much In- 
terference play — ’Marshall. Rather heavy 
position, but fine interference mates — 
Rothenberg. Offers considerable play — 
Shepard, 

No. 1552 by Dr. P, G, Keeney: 1 Qa3 (Two points) 
Pleasing economy and strategy— Gibbs. 
Neat Queen sacrifice— Pa ta. Pawn eqtu 
off at 11 nos of intersection of Rook — Mar- 
shall. 

No. 1553 by Simon Coslikyan: Two solutions 

1 Bel and the calamitous 1 RxBch (Three 
points each). The author's brilliant in- 
tention was 1 Bel. threat: 2 QeSch. If 1 
. . , Sd5; 2 Se3ch!, Sb4chS, 3 Sd5 mate. 
1 f 1 , . . llxiri; 2 3(14. If 1 . . . RxS: 2 
RxRch. If 1' . . . Re6; 2 Sc4-e5ch, If 1 
, , . RhG: 2 Sd4, 

No. 1554 by F. W, Watson: Two solutions 

1 Kc7 and 1 Rxbfl (Three points each). 
The author intended 1 Kc7, Sd5ch; 2 


No. 

No, 

No. 

No. 

No, 


BxSch, If 1 * . * 
else; 2 Rxc4ch. 

1555 by Aurel Tauber: 

1556 by Aurel Tauber; 
Aurel Tauber: 
Aurel Tauber: 


Sa8ch; 2 RxS, If 1 


1557 by 
155S by 
1559 by 

1 . 


No. 1560 by Aurel Tauber 


1 Qa8 (Two points) 

1 Qbl (Two points) 
l Rhl (Two points) 

1 RaS (Two points) 
Aurel Tauber: 1! Bal (Throe points) 
Path 2 Bh8. etc. 

1 Kb3 (Three points) 
1 . . , PxB; 2 Qhl ; 


No. 

No. 

No. 


No, 

No. 

No. 


1 , , . PfS; 2 Qh8. 

. . . KxB: 2 Sc7ch* 

1561 by Aurel Tauber: 1 Qhl (Three points} 

1 , . . Pa5; 2 Qh8. 1 . . . Pa6; 2 Sd3ch. 
1 . . . KxB; 2 S checks. 

1562 by Aurel Tauber: 1 Rhl (Five points) 

t i ’-,1 „ P ^v2 Pa4: 3 Rhl ' Pa 3 -’ * 

Ral H PaS: 6 Rhl, 

1563 by Aurel Tauber; 1 Ra2 (Four points) 

1 , . . Ral: 2 Rxf2, Rhl: 3 Ke2. 

An entertaining and instructive essay, 
ihe composer certainly has imagination 
and artistic ability for light problems— 
Gibbs. The problems are a flue execution 
of a carefully studied theme — Ro then berg 
A very interesting group— Hudson. Very 
interesting and instructive— Dod* En- 
joyed the article and problems very much 
—Lay, Compliments to Mr, Tauber for 
a splendid study — Fader, 

3564 by A, C. White: 1 Rcl 

1565 by A, C, White: 1 BdG 

1566 by A. C, White: 1- Kc3 


120 


The Chess Review 


No. 15fi7 by A, C, White; 1 Rh4 

No. 156S bv A, C, White: 1 QiU 

No. I5l>9 by A. C , White: 1 Ftf* 

No. 1570 by A. C. White: 1 PbS<B), PxP: 2 BfL 

1 , , . ig5; 2 Be5. J . . . FgG; 2 BdG. 

No. 1571 bv A. C. White: 1 PeS(Q), Pbl(Q); 2 ST5 
eh. 1 . . . Pbl(R>; 2 Qdich, 1 * . . Pbl 
(B>: 2 QoS. I , * * Pbl(S); 2 Qc3rh* 1'. . . . 
PxQ(R>; 2 QxeSch. L . . . PxQ{S); 2 
Rd3ch. 

No. 15T2 by A. C. White: 1 Ro7-f?7, Phl{Q); 2 QaS 
oh; 3 1 . . . Phl(R); 2 Qxf2: 3 Q 

or lixK. 1 ... Ph 1(B); 2 3 RxP. 

1 . . . Ph 1(3): 2 V(12; 3 RxS. 

Solvers were unanimous in praise of this 
set and Joined in sending greetings to 
Mr, White* His "mtbirlhdny present" — 
to misuse a term from “Alice in Wonder- 
land"— is found elsewhere in this issue* 


A microscopic opening mistake leads to 
disaster. 

Played in a Dutch Tournament 1940 
RUY LOPEZ 

(Notes by Dr. M. Euwe) 

Or. M, Euwe G, R* van Doesburgh 

White Black 


1 P-K4 

2 Kt-KB3 

3 B-Kt5 


P-K4 

KtQB3 

Kt-B3 


3 . . . P-QR3 is more customary, but it. is 
by no moans certain that the text is inferior* 
According to the present stare of opening 
theory, it should equalize, 

4 0-0 KtxP 

5 P-Q4 Kt-Q3? 

The books give 5 , , * B-K2; 6 Q-K2, Kt-Q3; 
7 BxKt, KtPxB ; 8 PxP, Kt-Kt2 etc. leading to 
the Rio do Janeiro variation, which has been 
extensively analyzed and played in the past. 
With good play Black can maintain equality. 

This game proceeds in almost ihe same way. 
leading Black to think that he is on well- 
known ground; but he later discovers that the 
omission of Q-K2 and . * * B-K2 makes a big 
difference, 

6 BxKt KtPxB 

. . * QPxB is probably better, but Black plays 
along the lines of the Rio de Janeiro Variation. 

7 PxP Kt-Kt2 

White can now transpose into the Rio de 
Janeiro Variation with Q-K2, but as he has a 
lead in development, he can proceed more 
energetically. 

7 Kt*Kt5 .... 


Beginning a sharp attack, which is justified 
by the fact that Black’s development is back- 
ward and he has not yet castled* 

S . , , . B-K2 


Or 8 . . . B-B4; 9 Q-R5, Q-K2; 10 Kt-QB3 
with advantage. 

9 Q-R5 P-Kt3 

Forced, as 9 , , * BxKt; 10 BxB loses the 
Queen 3 

10 Q*R6 . B-B1 

I t Q-R3 Kt-B4 

On 11 . . . P-Q4 White has the powerful 
reply 12 Q-QB3 threatening QxPch or P-K6* 

12 Q-KB3 Q‘K2 

There is no respite for Black, He has to 
make defensive moves all the time and has no 
chance to complete his development. 


13 B-K3 

P-KR3 

Black could have put up 

a better resistance 

with 13 . . . Kt-K3; 14 Kt-K4, B-Kt2; 15 Kt- 
B6ch, BxKt; 16 PxB. White, it is true, would 

retain the better game, 
decision would be in sight. 

but no immediate 

14 BxKt 

QxKt 

15 BxB 

KxB 

16 Q-B3 


This move, threatening 

P-Kti, is stronger 

than 16 P-K6, QPxP; 17 QxP, Q-Q4; IS QxBP, 
B-Kt2 and Black still has some play, 

16 * . . * 

K-Ktl 

Unfortunately Black cannot develop his B: 

16 . . . B-K12; 17 Q-Kticli 
Q-R3eh. 

or 16 * * , B-R3; 17 

17 Kt-Q2 

Q-B4 

17 . . . BJI3; IS Kt-K4, 
leads to the same position. 

Q-B4 ; 19 KR-KI 

18 KR-K1 

B-R3 

19 Kt-K4 

Q-K3 

20 Kt.Bfich 

K-Kt2 

21 KtxP 

4 ■ + m 

The first, material result 

of White's attack* 

If now 21 . . . QxKl? 22 P-K6eh. 

21 * * . . 

KR-Q1 

If 2t . , . Q-B5 ; 22 Q-B3 etc. 

22 Kt-B5 

Q-B6 

23 KtxB 

QxKt 

24 P-K6ch 

P-B3 

25 P-K7 

Resigns 


If 25 . * * R K1; 26 R-KK etc* 

(Translated from the “Haagsche Courant” 
by J.B.fi.) 


HIGH AND LOW SPOTS IN BOSTON 

High — T he State Chess Association has se- 
lected Worcester Academy for its Summer 
Outing this month* Low — Weatherman may 
be planning rain for that day. 

High — A double*round tournament at the City 
Club, is in progress wih seventeen entries. 
Low— Four of the leading top-notch players 
(Adams, Daly, Katz and Shapiro) each lost 
two games in the early rounds to lower rank- 
ing opponents* 

High— “The Christian Science Monitor" (F. 
R* Chevalier, chess editor) ran the news on 
the result of the recent U. S. Championship 
tourney. Low— None of the oilier six Boston 
daily papers ever mentioned it. 

High — The “Transcript's” weekly chess col- 
umn, under direction of the late John F. Barry, 
was appreciated by thousands for many years* 
Low — "Transcript's" chess column has been 
discontinued. 


SOLUTIONS TO 

“WOULD YOU HAVE SEEN IT? ! * T 

Ucbtman — De Dondt: 21 , * . R.BU 22 Q-KtT, 
R-Kt7 winning the Queen, Or 22 Q-KtC. Q-K2 
winning the Bishop. 

Rosenzweig — Nadell : 35 P-B6! K1-R4; 36 R- 
Kill! (threatening P-B7), PxP; 37 R-B5! Kt- 
Kt6 (if 37 . * * R*Kt4; 33 P-Kt 1 f wins); 38 
QxPch! \ KxQ; 39 R-R5 dbl ch, K-Kt2; 40 
R-R7 mate! 



HONOR PRIZE PROBLEM 
OTTO WURZBURG 
Grand Rapids, Mich* 
Dedicated to the Problem Editor 






WHITE MATES IN THREE MOVES 


The OFFICIAL ORGAN OF the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA CHESS FEDERATION 


Sensational Finish of Ventnor City Tourney 

Many Master Games * Opening Innovations 
Valuable Problem Article by A* C. White 


ANNUALLY $3.00 


MONTHLY 30 cents 




Official Organ of the 
United States of America 
Chess Federation 


Vol. VIII, No. 6 


Aug, -Sept, 1940 




CHESS 

REVIEW 


I. A, Horowitz 
Fred Rejneeld 
Editors 


Published hi - monthly June - September ; published 
monthly October - May by The Chess Review, 25 
West 4 3 rd Street, New York, N. Y. Telephone 
Wisconsin 7-3742- Domestic subscriptions: One 
Year $3-00; Two Years $5.50; Five Years $12,50. 
Single copy 30 cents. Foreign subscriptions: $3.50 
per year except U. $. Possessions, Canada, Mexico, 
Central and South America. Single copy 30 cents. 

Copyright 1939 by The Chess Review 

"Reentered as second class matter July 26, 1940, at 
the post office at New York, N. Y., under the Act 
of March 3, 1879. 


The Ventnor Tournament 


By Fred Reinfeld 


The second Ventnor Tournament* again held 
in the early part of July, was if anything an 
even greater success than its proud predecessor 
of 1939. The municipality was just as in- 
terested, the tournament officials were just as 
courteous, helpful and efficient, the entry was 
stronger and the bonus money for non-prize- 
winners was increased! 

Shortly before the tournament was slated to 
start, it suffered two sad defections. J. Levin 
and the writer had originally been invited 
to play and had, of course, accepted. Almost 
at the last moment, however, they were com- 
pelled to withdraw for business reasons. The 
Committee was indeed fortunate in being able 
to replace them with two such powerful play- 
ers as Donovan and Stephens. 


The tourney took an exciting course from 
the very start, and Bernstein and Hanauer 
(the order is alphabetical!) had to win their 
games in the last round to come first. The 
chess was as lively as one would expect from 
such an excellent field and such pleasant 
playing conditions. Donovan was perhaps the 
most surprising of many surprises in this 
tournament; he reinforced the good impres- 
sion he had previously created in the Marshall 
Championship Tournament, no mean feat for 
a youngster. 

I know that I express the sentiments of the 
players in voicing my appreciation of Mayor 
Hodsoffis keen interest in the tournament, 
as well as of the masterly handling of the 


VENTNOR CITY, 1940 


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3 | Weaver W. Adams V2V2 i Vi 

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4a J. F. Donovan . . . | Q | Y2V2 

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0 0 

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4c Olaf I. Ulvestad \y 2 \ 0 10 

1 

V2 

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0 

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8 Philip Woliston j 1 1 

0 1 |i/ 2 0 1 0 

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9 I Harry Morris 


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10b| Edgar T. McCormick 

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12 L. Walter Stephens 

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121 


122 


Thk Chess Review 


tournament details by Messrs. Wayne, Des- 
sauer and Phillips, 

An important innovation of the tournament 
was the exclusive use, for the first time in 
tournament history, of all-electric docks (de- 
signed and made by one of the tournament 
officials, Gerald Phillips). The clocks gave 
absolutely no trouble, not a single complaint 
from anyone, and not a second’s anxiety as 
to breakdowns or inaccuracy! At the end of 
four hours' play, every one of the six clocks 
registered exactly four hours every session. 

On July 14, the regular and special prizes 
were awarded, although one of the players 
returned his bonus .money .in order to main- 
tain his amateur standing. As tire tournament 
was important enough to warrant more ex, 
tended discussion, all the special prize games 
will be given in succeeding issues of The Chess 
Review, 





Tournament Director RICHARD W, WAYNE 


W bite's 
prize. 


deep play ass tires him a tie for first 

NIMZQVECH DEFENSE 


S. 


(Notes by S. N. Bernstein) 


N. Bernstein 
White 

1 P-K4 

2 P-Q4 

3 P-K& 

4 P-QB3 


H. Morris 

Black 

Kt QB3 
P Q4 
P-K3 
P-QR4 


The respective strategical plans are now 
clear: White will try to smash through on the 
K side, Black on the Q side. The seemingly 
bizarre text is perfectly logical; Black wishes 
to exchange off White's dangerous KB. White 
could avoid this exchange by P-KK13 and B R3, 
but he is loath to leave Black’s QB In control 
of so important a diagonal. 5 B-Q3 followed 
by 6 Q~K2 would be a waste of time, as Black 
continues with . * . KKt-K2 followed by . . , 
P-QK13, . . . KTQKtl and + . . B-R3 just the 
same! Thus White at this early stage re- 
conciles himself to the exchange and therefore 
never plays R-Q3, which would only lose a 
tempo. 


An original maneuver. Usually the B is left at 
home, in the vague hope of a Pawn breaking 
through to open the diagonal QRl-KRfb White 
prefers to station the B at KB2 where it guards 
against possible checks at KR4 and from where 
it can in some positions go to R4 with an an- 
noying pin. 

6 . . . . P^QKt3 

7 Kt-Q2 B-R3 

8 BxB RxB 

9 Kt-K2 Kt-B4 

10 B-B2 P-R4 

The typical move in this kind of position. 
Black controls white squares to frustrate 
White’s K aide attack and prepares for . . , 
P-QKU-5 followed by . . . R-Kt3 and an even- 
tual . . . F-QB4, 

11 Kt-KKt3 P-Kt3 


Of course not 11 ... KtxKi; 12 PxKt, P-K13 ; 
13 P-KKt 1 winning a P. 

12 KtxKt KtPxKt 

13 Kt-BI p~R5 

Apparently forced, for White is threatening 
simply P-KR4 and 15 Kt-Kt3 winning the KRP. 
If 13 * , , B-K2; 14 P-KR4, P-Kt4 (if 14 * . . 
R-Ktl ; 15 QxP, RxP; 16 Kt-Kt3 wins the 
exchange); 15 Kt-Kt3, RxP; 16 KtxRP with 
a winning position. 

Or else 13 , , , Kt-K2; 14 B-R4I Q-Q2; 15 Kt- 
Kt3, Kt-Kt3; 16 B-B6 followed by KtxRP etc, 

14 Kt-K3 B-K2 

More aggressive seems . . . P-K14; but the 
developing text-move is plausible enough. 

15 Q-K2 R-Ri 


Morris 



Bernstei n 


16 K-Q2 ! 

Establishing communication between the Rs 
and insuring rapid success on the K side. If 
only Black's QR hadn’t moved, he would be 


able to castle Q side and avoid the storm! 

16 ... . Q>Q2 

17 P- K K t4 ! PxP 

18 QxP K-Q1 

19 Q-Kt7 Q-K1 

Of course not 19 + . , R-K131 ; 20 BxP. 

20 QR-KKtl Q.B1 

21 P-B51 K-K1 

22 P-B6 QxQ 

23 RxQ B~B1 

24 KR-KKtl I BxR 


5 P-KB4 

6 B-K3 


KKbK2 



Aug. 


Sep t . 194 0 


123 


Declining the sacrifice would likewise he of 
no avail. 


25 Fx B 

26 BxP 

27 B -86 

And not 27 RxKt, KxR; 

27 , * « . 

28 R-Kt4 

29 P-KR4 

30 PxKt(G) 

31 RxR 

32 P-R5 

33 P-R 6 

34 KUKt4 


R-KKtl 

Kt-K2 


28 P KR4, P-KB1 etc. 

Kt-Kt3 
K-Q 2 
Kt-BI 
QRxQ 
RxR 


R-KtG 
R-R 6 
Resig ns 


For he is helpless against 35 B-K17 and 36 
Kt-R6. 


A to use battle worthy oj the final round! 
ENGLISH OPENING 
(Notes by M. Han alter) 

A. E. Santasiere M, Hanauer 

White Black 


1 

P-QB4 

P-K4 

5 PxP 

KtxP 

2 

Kt-QB3 

Kt-KB3 

6 P-K Kt3 

B-K2 

3 

Kt-B3 

Kt-B3 

7 B-Kt2 

B~K3 

4 

P-Q3 

P-Q4 

8 0-0 

OO 


9 P-Q R3 


9 P-Q-i can he played, hut. with the lost 
tempo is not so effective. The continuation 
might be !) . . . KtxKt; 10 PxKt, P-K5 followed 
by play on the white squares (. , . F-R4, . . . 
B Ql, . . . KHR4-B5). Or 9 . . . PxP; 10 KtxP, 
KtxQKt; U PxKt (11 KtxKt? or KtxB? loses 
a piece) , KtxKt; 12 PxKt, R-R 3. 

9 . , . . P-B3 

10 Q-B2 Q Q2 

11 Kt-K4 . * * . 

White's strategy is to invade QR5, with 
pressure on the lines KRPQRS and QR2-KKLS. 
But it is all a question of timing, and one 
effeet of the Black Kt on Q4 is to prevent the 
move B-K3, and so to slow up the development 
of White's pieces. 

11 ... . p-QKtai? 

A hold counter! Black opens up the white 
diagonal, and seemingly weakens the QBP. 
However, the position of White’s pieces on 
the QB file allows Black to light for possession 
of this line. 


12 P-Q Kt4? 

A further neglect of development. The move 
is noi so important that it cannot be delayed 
in favor of R-Q2 and R-Rl. 

12,,.. P-QR4 

13 P-Kt5 KLQ5 

14 KtxKt PxKt 

15 P-QR4 . , . . 

Q“R4 is met by . . . P-KE4 f If then 16 
Kt-Kt5, BxKt; 17 BxE, P-B5 ! IS PxP, P-R3; 
19 ERR Kt B6 E 20 Q-B2, B-Ufl; 2;i B-Kt3 (if 
21 RxR, Q-KtSch), BxB; 22 KxR, QxKtP. 

15 . . * . QR-B1 

16 KUQ2 .... 

Idea: Kt-B-f. Rut since he never makes the 
move, B-Q2 would have been more prudent. 

16 .... . R.B3 

17 PxP RxP 

18 Q-Kt2 Kt-B61 



The wirmahs! 

HANAUER and BERNSTEIN 


Hanauer 



Santasiere 


19 R-K1 

If 13 RxR, KtxPch; 20 K-Rl (20 K-Kt.2, R- 
RGch), QxRch; 21 P-R3, B QKt5 ! 22 Kt-K4, 
K1-B6 ; 28 Q-R2 (protecting the RP), B-Q4; 

24 R-Kt2, P-B4 ; 25 Kt-Q2, R-Kl! 26 R-R2 (not 
26 K Kt2? R-K7ch; 27 R-R 2, BxPchR R-K6. 

Black has a terrific bind plus threats of 
winning the QRP or KBP (via . . , P-KKL4-5) 
and if White attempts any counter-attack he 
loses immediately: 27 BxKt? PxB ; 28 Kt-B4, 
RxP; 29 RxR, BxRch; 30 K-KtL, R-B4ch; 31 
K-Bl, R-K7ch f 3 32 KxR, Q-Kt7ch followed by 
, . . Q-RS mate. 

If 19 Kt-R4, B-Kt5! 20 BxR, QxB (threaten- 
ing . . . R-KR6) . 

I 21 P-K1, KtxRP; 22 Q-B2, P-QKt4; 23 
KGR3, QxQ ; 24 KtxQ, R-B5; 26 R-R 3, Kt-B4 
etc. 

It 21 P-H3, KtxRP; 22 Q-E2 T P-Ktf ; 23 Kt- 
R3, Q-B6! ! 

White therefore compromises on a third 
move-- with the usual bad result. 

19 ... . B-QKtSI 




124 


The Chess Review 


The killer! If White now takes the R, he 
can't move a piece: 20 BxR, QxB; 21 P-K4, 
PxP e.p,; 22 PxP* KtxRP; 23 Q-Ktl, B-R6; 
21 P-K4p Q-B4ch; 25 KR1, Q-B7; 26 R-Ktl, 
BxKl. 

20 P-K3 

21 PxP 

22 P-Q4 

Belter than . . . KtxP; 
have no mores. 

23 R-K81? 


PxP 

R-Q3 

R-QB1 

White's pieces still 


A blunder* but things are hopeless; if 23 
K-Rl, P-B4 ; 24 K-KU, K-Rl ; 25 K R1* KtxP 
etc, 

23 ... * Kt-K7ch 

24 K-B2 B-B6 

25 0 Ktl KtxB 

26 RxKt .... 

QxKt. is met by . . . BxP. 


26 ... . 

BxKt 

30 P-K4 

Q-B4ch 

27 RxRch 

QxR 

31 Q-K3 

Q-B7ch 

2S Q-Q3 

B^QKt5 

32 Q-K2 

B-B4c h 

29 P-Q5 

B.KB4 

33 K-B1 

Q-B6 

34 

R-Q1 

» m i v 


To stop 

, . . Q-Q5; : 

after Black wins 

the RP 

{still the 
B-K14, 

same one!) 

he is threatening . . . 

34 

■ i » 

B-Q2 


35 

R-Q3 

Q-R8ch 


36 

R-Q1 

Resigns 

QxR P 



Both players show equal courage, but Black 
appraises the play more accurately. 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 

(Notes by A, ID, Santasiere) 

J. Donovan A. E. Santasiere 

White Black 


1 P-Q4 

2 P-QB4 

3 Kt KB3 

4 P-K3 


P-Q4 

P-QB3 

Kt-B3 


One of the strongest continuations at White's 
disposal. 

4 . . . . P-K3 7 BxBP P-Q Kt4 

5 Kt-B3 QKLQ2 8 B-Q3 P.QR3 

6 B-Q3 PXP 9 0-0 . . . . 

As is well-known* & F-K4 is more aggressive 
(see Bernstein-McCormick, Ventnor 1939). 

9 . . . . P-B4 

10 PxP .... 

To avoid a possible isolated QP; but it is 
premature and ultra-simple. In the first place, 
the isolated P was not a certainty; secondly* 
an isolated P is not a death warrant — what 
with open lines and the initiative. In chess* 
one must be ready to live dangerously— the 
reward is sure to be great — and the suffering 
too! Q-K2 should have been played. 

ID ... . BxP 

11 P-QKt3 .... 

Inferior to P-QR3 and P-QKtl. 

11 ... . B~Kt2 

12 B-Kt2 0-0 

13 R-B1 Q-K2 

14 Q-K2 B-R6 

Due to White’s questionable 11th move, this 
strong continuation is possible. 



SANTASIERE plots . . . 


15 BxB QxB 

16 Kt-Ktl .... 

Correct; he cannot permit Black’s Q to re- 
main in so dominating a position. 

16 ... . Q-R4 

17 P-QR3 KR-B1 

To permit . , . Q-Ql* which will in turn 
reserve QKL3 for QKt. 

18 P-QKt4 Q-Q1 

19 QKt-Q2 .... 

Though White has lost some time, this is 
not serious, as he has eliminated weaknesses 
on his Q side and completed his development. 

19 ... . RxR 

20 RxR R~B1 

21 Q-Q1 RxR 

22 QxR P-Kt3 

To free Lhe KKt as well as the K. 

23 Kt-Kt3 .... 

Playing to win on the Q side, regardless 
of the resulting K side weakness, Donovan 
is a brave and talented young master and it is 
refreshing to see him reject the cautious Q-B2 
for a frank speculation. 

23 ... . Bx Kt 

Black is perfectly willing to "mix it up"; 
ho has already decided to abandon the Q side 
for a K side attack the issue of which is by 
no means certain. 


24 PxB Kt-K4 

25 B-K2 P-Kt4 j 

Both to hinder P-B4 and to prepare the 
powerful , . . P-Kt5. 

26 Q-B5 Kt-Q4 

27 Kt-Q4 .... 

Donovan is still in an adventurous mood, 
Q-Q4 was safer and would have given the game 
quite a different complexion, i,e. 27 . . , P-B3 
(seems best); 23 Kt-B5 (and not 29 Q-R7, 
Q-Bl followed by , . . Q-B3, 



A U G . 


121 


S k i > r * 19 4 0 


27 * , . , Q-33 

The (He is cast; Black's Q side Ps are lost. 

28 Q-B8ch K-Kt2 

29 QxRP K1-B6 

30 BxP P-Kt5 \ 

The winning move; there is no defense (31 
PxP, KtxP), White has paid too high a price 
for his Ps; the temporary inactivity of his 
Q and B is fatal. 



Donovan 



31 

8-B6 



PxP 


32 

Q-B1 



Kt-K7ch 

Winning 

a piece; 

now White's K will be 

continually 

bombarded until 

his official demise. 


33 

KtxKt 



Px Kt 


34 

QxP 



KtxB 


35 

Q-R6 



Q-Kt3ch 

Better than 35 , * , 

Q-RSch; 36 Q-Bl, QxRP? 

37 

Q'Kt2ch* 





36 

K-B1 

KLK4 


41 

K-K 1 Kt-Kt5 

37 

P-KtS 

G-KtSch 


42 

K-Q2 QxBPch 

38 

K-K12 

G-K5ch 


43 

K-B3 QxPch 

39 

K-B1 

G'RSch 


44 

K-Kt4 Q-Q5ch 

40 

K-K2 

Q-B6c h 




As pesky 

as a horsefly. 




45 

K-Kt3 



GFQ6c h 


46 

K-K14 



Kt-K4 

Theme and variations. 



47 

Q-B8 

Q-Q5ch 


52 

P-QR4 P-B4 

48 

HGKt3 

Kt Q6 


53 

K-Kt4 P-B5 

43 

Q-B4 

Kt-B4c h 


54 

P-R5 KtxP 

50 

K-Kt4 

QxQeh 


White resigns; the 

51 

KxQ 

Kt*Kt2 


KxP ending is lost. 



QUEEN’S 

GAMBIT 



Short and s ice cL 


H . Morris 

E. T. McCormick 

White 


Black 


1 P-Q 4 

P-Q4 

10 B~K Kt5 

B-Kt2 

2 P-Q B4 

PxP 

11 QR Q1 

R-K1 

3 Kt-KB3 

KDKB3 

12 KR-K1 

Q Kt-Q 2 

4 P-K3 

P-K3 

13 Kt K5 

P-QR3 

5 BxP 

P-B4 

14 KtxP 

KxKt 

6 0-0 

PxP 

15 QxPch 

K-Kt3 

7 PxP 

B.K2 

16 G-B7ch 

KxB 

8 Kt-Q B3 

0-0 

17 QxPch 

K-B4 

9 Q-K2 

P~Q Kt3 

18 B-K6ch 

Resigns 



■ - . . - - -■ + 

■■-r, : , 


Left to right: STEPHENS, BURDGE, ULVE- 
ST AD, DONOVAN, BERNSTEIN, HANAUER, 
MORRIS, SANTASIERE 


An opening blander is punished relentlessly. 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 


W, 


(Notes by W. W 

W, Adams 


Ada ms) 

H, Morris 


White 


Black 


1 P-K4 P-Q B4 

2 Kt-K B3 P-G3 

3 P-Q4 PxP 

4 KtxP Kt KB3 


5 Kt-QB3 P-K Kt3 

6 B4<2 B-Kt2 

7 B-K3 Kt-83 

8 Q-Q2 , . , * 


With the idea of castling Q side followed by 
a K side attack via P-KB3, P-KKL4, P-KR1-5 
etc. It is true that Black can now force an 
exchange of White's KB by , . , Kt-KKt5, but 
this is the less valuable of White's Jis and 
should he worth no more if not less than 
Black's well-posted Kt at KB3. 

8 , , , . P-Q4? 

Somebody once made a rule that in the 
Dragon Variation* Black should always play 
. * . P-Q 4 in answer to White's Q-Q2. But this 
does not apply before Black has castled, due 
to White’s powerful rejoinder. 



9 

8-QK15! 


B-Q2 



10 

PxP 


Kt-K 4 



11 

P B4 


GKt-Kt5 



12 

B-Ktl 


P-KR4 


Ollier wise White 

plays 

13 P*KR3, 

Kt-R3; 

14 

F-KK14 

with the unpleasant threat of P-Kt5. 

13 

P-KR3 

Kt-R3 

20 

R-Q4 

KxKt 

14 

Q-0-0 

R-QB1 

21 

K 6 1 

QxR 

15 

Q-K2 

P-R3 

22 

BxQ 

BxB 

16 

B-B4 

Q-B21 ? 

23 

Kt-K4 

KLB4 

17 

P-Q 6 1 

QxP 

24 

B-B3 

B-Q4 

18 

Kt-K6 ! 

G-Kt5 

25 

KtxKt 

Px Kt 

19 

KtxBch 

K-B1 

26 

BxPch 

Resigns 


FOR RADIO AMATEURS 

One of our readers, b M + Sawyer of Haven, 
Kansas, makes the interesting suggestion that 
those of our readers who are amateur radio 
operators ought to send in their frequency and 
call letters, Mr, Sawyer (W 9 RWK - 7281 
K. C.) adds, "there would no doubt be a lot of 
radio matches as the result of such a policy. 3 ' 


126 


The Chess Review 


A LETTER TO THE EDITORS 

Gentlemen : 

I take this opportunity to correct an erro- 
neous report concerning the outcome of my game 
with Dr. Emanuel Lasker on February 30, 
1911. Dr. Lasker very modestly says he lost 
this game after sacrificing his eight Pawns, two 
Bishops, two Knights, two Rooks and his 
Queen. As a matter of fact, only two Pawns 
were sacrificed (not eight), and the doctor 
won the game when I missed a saving move 
in trying for a mate in 27 moves. Here is the 
crucial position: FI iagel 



Dr. Lasker 


My last move — -a check with the Knight- 
proved a mistake, for now Dr. Lasker mates 
in two moves, beginning with K-K6. 

A still more interesting finish occurred in 
my tenth match game with the Emperor Nero. 
As a reward for my teaching him the game, he 
sportingly offered me a chance to save myself 
from the Hon pit, All 1 had to do was beat 
him in a ten-game match. Unfortunately for 
me, he picked up the game with amazing speed, 
and the best I could do in the first nine games 
was 4 1/2 ~ 4 1 / 2 - 1° the tenth game, however, I 

was at my best and worked up the following 
position, which is an easy win for the White 
pieces (my side) : Nero 



Fliegel 

While I was pondering my next move 
[which, naturally, cannot be P-R8 (Q, R, Kt 


or B) because of the stalemate,} Nero grew' 1 
angry when he saw that he would Jose quickly 
after P-R6 or BxPch. Cunningly noting the 
stalemate after P^R8, he feigned a yawn and 
commanded, ,! I grow tired. Either you mate 
me in two moves or you lose the game.” 

Imagine my dismay upon hearing this! Pro- 
testing that there was no rule in chess penal- 
izing the side with the advantage for failure 
to mate in two, proved of no avail. So there 
was nothing to do but mate him in two moves. 
I found the solution in two minutes, but I 
doubt that anyone else w r ould find it in two 
years, so 1 mercifully give it here. 

The first move is P-R8. What does the 
Pawn become?! Since it cannot remain a White 
piece or Pawn because of the stalemate, it must 
obviously become a Black piece! Of course a 
Black Rook or Queen or King is out of the 
question because of I P . . R or Q or KxB, 
If it becomes a Black Bishop, then 1 „ . . 
BxPch wins for Black. If it becomes a Black 
Knight, then 1 . . . Kt-Kt3 and there is no 
mate in two for White. But if it becomes a 
Black Pawn ....!! 

In the actual game there followed 1 , , , 
P-R2 (the only time I have ever seen such 
a move in any recorded game) and 2 BxRP 
mate. Yours, 

JOSEPH A. FLIEGEL 

P. S. He threw me to the lions anyway. 

Blindfold Exhibition, Boston 1940 
COLLE SYSTEM 


G. Koltanowski G. Sturgis 

(Blindfold) 

White Black 


1 

P-Q4 

P-Q4 

17 Q-K2 

P-QKt3 

£ 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-KB3 

18 R-K1 

B-B3 

3 

P-K3 

P-B4 

19 B-KtS 

QR-K1 

4 

P B3 

P-K3 

20 BxB 

RxB 

5 

B-Q3 

Kt-B3 

21 QR Q1 

P-K5 

6 

QKt-Q2 

B-Q3 

22 K Kt-Q4 

R-R3 

7 

00 

0-0 

23 P-KR3 

Kt-K4 

8 

PxP 

BxP 

24 KtxB 

R(1)xKt 

9 

P-K4 

Q-B2 

25 Kt-Q4 

R{K3)-Kt3 

10 

Q-K2 

P- K4 ? \ 

26 P-KB4 

RxPi 

11 

PxP 

Kt xP 

For if 27 

PxKt, Qx 

12 

BxPch 

KxB 

KP wins 

(28 Kt-B3, 

13 

Q-K4ch 

K-Ktl 

PxKtl ! ). 


14 

QxKt 

B-K2 

27 K-B2 

Kt-Kt5ch 

15 

Kt-Kt3 

B-K3 

28 K-Ktl 

R-R7 

16 

Q-K4 

P-B4 

29 R-Q2 
Resigns 

R{3)-R3 


SOUTHERN CHAMPIONSHIP 

This year’s Southern Chess Association Tour- 
nament produced the following results: 

Championship Class: First, Woodbury 7 3&- 
1V£; second, Hernandez 7-2; third and fourth, 
Henderson and Mitchell 5*4. 

Class A: First, Burton 7 36-114; second and 
third, Palmer and Woody 7-2. 

Class B: First, Taylor 8 34 -14 ; second, 6-3; 
third and fourth. Brown and Mrs. Harrison 
514-314. 



New Ground In The Gruenfeld Defense 

By M + Yudovich 


A number of important continuation*; in this 
defense have had new light shed on them in 
the course of the Correspondence Champion- 
ship of the U, S, $. R., which is now in pro- 
gress. The attention of theorists is now 
concentrated on the well-known position which 
is attained after 1 P-Q4, Kt-KB3; 2 P-QB4, 
P-KKt3; 3 Kt-QB3, P-Q4; 4 B-B4, B-Kt2 ; 5 
P-K3, O-O; 6 R-Bl, P-B4; 7 QPxP> Q-R4; 8 
PxP, R-Ql (see Diagram I). 


Diagram l 



This was how the Avro encounter between 
Capablanca and Reshevsky developed. Capa- 
blaoca continued 9 Q-R4 and after 9 ^ QxQ; 
ID KtxQ, KtxP Black obtained more than 
adequate compensation for the Pawn. 

In the eleventh Championship Tournament 
of the U. S. S. R. (Leningrad 1939), the Len- 
ingrad master Tolush played 9 Q-Q2 against 
Botvin nik, unexpectedly answering 9 ■ ■ ■ KtxP 
with 10 B-B7, This superficially effective move 
was energetically refuted, however, by Rot- 
vinnik who played 10 . . . QxB; 11 KtxKt, 
RxKt! 12 QxR, B-K3; 13 Q-Q2, Kt-B3 with 
a formidable attack. 

In his notes to this game, Botvinnik pro- 
posed what he considered a stronger continua- 
tion for White: 9 B-B4. This move was 
analyzed very carefully by the Leningrad player 
A. Orobeiko, The principal line of his analy- 
sis went as follows: 9 - . . B-K3; 10 Q-R4 ? 
QxQ; 11 KtxQ, KtxP; 12 Kt-KB3, KtxB; 
13 PxKt, BxB; 14 RxB with White retaining 
the extra Pawn. 

If, however, this variation is continued for 
just one more move, it is easy to conclude that 
Black has at least an equal game: 14 . . . P- 
QKt4! 13 PxP, PxP (see Diagram II). 

If for example 1 6 KtxP, RxP etc.; while 16 
Kt~B3 is followed by . . . BxKtch or even , . + 
P-QKt4. This is the refutation of Orobeiko s 
analysis. 


Diagram II 



A new possibility for White was found by 
the Moscow player Polkvoi in a game against 
Rosenkrantz in the Correspondence Champion- 
ship: after 9 B-R4, B-K3 he played 10 P- 
QKt4!? (see Diagram III). 


Diagram 111 



This was followed by 10 , . . QxKtP; 11 
Q-Kt3, QxQ; 12 BxQ (bad is 12 PxQ, KtxP; 
13 KtxKt, BxKt; 14 R-Ql, B-B6ch). Now 
12 . . . KtxP; 13 KtxKt, BxKt; 14 R-Ql, 
B-B6ch; 13 K-K2 is unsatisfactory for Black 
as material loss by P-K4 is menaced. Likewise 
the sacrifice of the exchange by 1 3 * , , RxKt 
after 10 P-QKt43? QxKtP; 11 Q-Kt3, QxQ; 12 
BxQ, KtxP; 13 KtxKt is also insufficient. 

It seems, however, that the simple retreat 
of the QB to Q2 parries the latest attempt 
to refute the Gruenfeld Defense: for example 
10 P-QKt4J? QxKtP; 11 Q-Kt3> QxQ; 12 
BxQ, B-Q2; 13 Kt-B3, R-QB1: (weak is 13 
. . . Kt-R3; 14 P-B6, PxP; 15 PxP, BxP; 16 
BxPch, KxB; 17 Kt-K5di) ; 14 Kt-K2, Kt- 
K5 and Black wins back the Pawn with a 
good position. Or 13 P-K4, Kt-R3; 14 B-K3, 
Kt-KKt5 and Black again regains material 
equality. 


127 




128 


The Chess Review 


TWO OF A KIND 


PARADOX! 


As the Gruenfdd Defense is one of the most 
popular and also one of the most complicated 
opening lines of present day tournament play, 
fascinating variations are being discovered with 
almost amazing regularity, Here is a case in 
point. 

Amsterdam 1940 
INDIAN DEFENSE 
H« Kmoch L, Prins 

White Black 


The amateur is warned, and with good rea- 
son, to concentrate on bringing out his pieces 
rapidly and to avoid too many Pawn moves 
in the opening. Yet in the following game, 
White starts off with fourteen consecutive Pawn 
moves!!! . . . and a won game! All of which 
shows that Marshall still retains his old touch. 

Marshall Chess Club Championship 1939-40 
SICILIAN DEFENSE 


1 P-Q4 

2 P-QB4 

3 Kt-QB3 

4 K1-B3 


KLKB3 
F-KKt3 
P-Q4 
B Kt2 


5 Q^Kt3 

6 QxBP 

7 P-K4 

8 P-K5! 


PxP 

0-0 

P-Kt3 

B-K3 



9 

PxKt! 

BxQ 

16 

Kt-Kt5! 

P-K3 

10 

Px B 

KxP 

17 

RxPch [ R 

esigns 

11 

BxB 

Kt-B3 

For if 17 . . . 

K-R3; 

12 

B-K3 

Kt-Kt5 

IS 

RxPch! KxKt ; 19 

13 

0-0 

Kt-B7 

P-R4ch r K-Kt5 ; 

20 B- 

14 

QR-Q1 

KtxB 

K2ch leads to 

mate. 

15 

PxKt 

P-QB4? 





Makovetz Memorial Tournament 




Budapest 1939 




INDIAN 

DEFENSE 



L. Szabo 


G. Barcza 


White 


Black 


1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

23 

PxR 

QxP 

2 

P-QB4 

P-KKt3 

24- 

B-R3 

P-K3 

3 

Kt-QB3 

P-Q4 

25 

QR-Ktl 

Q-Q6 

4 

Kt-B3 

B-Kt2 

26 

B-B5 

Q-Q4 

5 

Q-Kt3 

PxP 

27 

B-Q4 

P-R5 

6 

QxBP 

0-0 

2 S 

B-R1 

P-R4 

7 

P-K4 

P-Kt3 

29 

Kt-K5 

R-R2 

8 

P-K5 ! 

B-K3 

30 

KR-Q1 

Q-K5 

9 

PxKt! 

BxQ 

31 

Kt-B3 

Q-B4 

10 

PxB 

KxP 

32 

R-KtS 

P-B3 

11 

BxB 

P-QB3 

33 

P-R4! 

P-K4 

12 

0-0 

P-QR4 

34 

BxP] ! 

PxB 

13 

R-K1 

P-R3 

35 

Kt-Kt5c h 

K-Kt2 

14 

B-B4 

P-QKt4 

36 

R (1 )-Q8 

R-KB2 

15 

B-KB1 

Kt-Q£ 

37 

R-Kt8ch 

K-B3 

16 

P-QS 

P-Kt5 

38 

R-Kt6ch 

K-K2 

17 

PxP 

PxKt 

39 

R-Kt7ch 

K-Q3 

18 

PxKt 

PxP 

40 

RxR Q-Kt8ch 

19 

B-K5ch 

K-R2 

41 

K-R2 

P-R6 

20 

BxP 

QxP 

42 

R-QR7 

Q-Kt5 

21 

P-QR4! 

KR-QKtl 

43 

RxPch 

K-Q4 

22 

B-Kt5 

RxB 

44 

Kt-R3! and 

wins 


F. J. Marshall 

White 


1 

P-K4 

P-QB4 


P-QKt4 

PxP 

3 

P QR3 

Kt-QB3? 

4 

PxP 

Kt-B3 

5 

P-Kt5 

Kt-Q5 

6 

P-QB3 

Kt-K3 

7 

P-K5 

Kt-Q4 

8 

P-QB4 

Kt(4)-B5 

9 

F-Kt3 

Kt-Kt3 

0 

P-B4 

Kt(Kt3)xP 


H. Rogosin 

Black 

Or 10 ♦ , . Kt-B2; 11 
P-KI35, KtxKP ; 12 F- 
Q4 etc. 

11 PxKt KtxP 

12 P-Q4 KUKt3 

13 P-R4 P-K3 

14 P-R5 

How long can this 
keep up?! 


Rogosin 



M arshal I 


14 

■ ■ a hi 

B-Kt5ch 

£1 

Kt-Kt5 

PxP 

15 

B-Q2 

BxBch 

22 

PxP 

QxQch 

16 

KtxB 

Kt-K2 

23 

RxQ 

K-K2 

17 

Kt-K4 

Kt-B4 

24 

R-R3 

P-Kt3 

18 

P-R6 

P-KKt3 

25 

B-Kt2 

R-QKtl 

19 

20 

Kt-B6ch 

Kt-B3 

K-B1 

P-Q3 

26 

Kt{5)xRP Resigns 


The Central Indiana Chess Association held 
its annual tournament this year during lire 
last two weeks of April. Forty-four men were 
grouped into seven sections, each man playing 
two games with every other man in his section. 
The section champions then met and played 
in the same way for the individual champion- 
ship, which was won by Mr, B, F. Collins, a 
student at Butler University, with Mr. Clark 
B. Hicks as runner-up. 

The two final games between these players 
were played at the association's annual ban- 
quet on April 30th, and Mr. Collins, the winner, 
was presented with a set of chess men. At 
this banquet, the association also awarded its 
team trophies. 


The National Championship Tournament 


Following is the authorized list of contri- 
butions to this year s National Championship 
Tournament as submitted by L* Waiter Ste^ 
phetis, Chairman of the Tournament Committee, 
ft will be noted that there was a considerable 
falling off from the previous tournament's to- 
tal of $2188,34. But this only highlights 
more prominently the generosity of those who 
did contribute, as well as the efficiency of Mr, 
Stephens in carrying out a very difficult task. 

— F.R, 


L, W, Stephens , rr ,_ $250,00 

NCF Committee 1938 250.00 

George Sturgis 100.00 

C-. E. Roosevelt 100.00 

G. Pfeiffer 50.00 

T. Tu rover „„ 50.00 

F. Altschul _ 50.00 

E. Dimock 25,00 

L. J + Wolff ,__ 25.00 

M. Wertheim - 25.00 

Dr. Ell Moschowitz 25.00 

A, T. He rides on __ 25.00 

William Reese - . — 25.00 

L, X Isaacs 25.00 

W + Y. M. P. Mitchell =____- 25.00 

R, W ah r burg 25.00 

Lid bury 20.00 

D. B. Meyer 20.00 

Henry Atlas - ____ _ _ 15.00 

Waite Timme 15.00 

Carrol Wilson 10.00 

Shepard Morgan 10.00 

W. Lowenhaupt - -* ___ 10.00 

H, G. Tyer 10.00 

N. W. Banks 10.00 

R. Welch, Jr, 10.00 

H* M + Phillips ___ 10.00' 

Alex Bisno 10,00 

R. Relieve rria 6.00 

C. Lansing Hays — 5.00 

J, J, Watson , 5,00 

D. F* Sicher . 5,00 

A. G. Lynn .___. 5,00 

Mr, Creighton 5,.00 

Max Meyer 5.00 

Sidney Smith, Jr. 5,00 

R. Guttierez __________ 5,00 

C. Spicehandler _ 5,00 

Dr, Kirkpatric __________ 5,00 

s J* A* Howard _ 5.00 

Mr. Lopez _ __ 5.00 

E. B. Adams __ __ 5.00 

H, W, Corning 5.00 

Portland Chess Club, Maine ,___ 5,00 

Boyleton C. C, f Boston 5.00 

E. Cornell 5.00 

Mr. Bab a kin ___ 2,00 

Dr. Greenberg _______ 1.00 

Rev, Yavneh _________ 1,00 

S, Rosenbaum _____ 1,00 

Dr, McCulloch 1.00 


$1,322.00 


One of l he positional masterpieces of the 
tournament. 


GIUOCO PIANO 


(Notes by S. N. Bernstein) 

S. N. Bernstein S. Reshevsky 

White Black 


1 P-K4 

2 Kt-KB3 

3 B-B4 

4 P-Q3 

5 Kt-B3 


P-K4 

Kt-QB3 

Kt-B3 

B-B4 


Intending, after 5 . . . P-Q3, to essay the 
Canal Variation (6 B-KKtS, P-KR3; 7 BxKt, 
QxB ; 8 KI-Q5). But Black probably guesses 
his opponent’s intentions and decides to foil 
them.) 


5 , . . . 

6 B- K3 

7 0-0 

8 PxB 

9 R-K1 


P-KR3 

B-Kt5 

BxKt 

0-0 


rn order to make this piece effective in the 
event of 9 . . . F-Q4; 10 PxP, KtxP; 11 B-Q2 
attacking the KP, 

9 . . . . P-Q3 

10 R-Ktl .... 


But this is pointless, P-QR4 or P-QR3 was in 
order to take the sting out of Black’s next 
move. 


10 ... . Kt-QR4 

11 B-Kt3 KtxB 

12 RxKt P-QKt3 

Black doesn't mind creating holes on his 
white squares, since he still has the white- 
squared B while White's is gone* 

13 P-B4 B-K3 

14 Kt-Q2 

With a view to 15 P-B4 or 15 P-Ql, White 
hopes that the sequel will allow him to bring 
his Rs to the K side for an attack, 


14 ... * Kt-Kt5 

15 P-Q4 KtxB 


No Bs of opposite color! 

16 PxKt 

17 P-Q5 

18 PxP 

19 R-B1 


P-KB4 

B~Q2 

RxP 


White vacillates. Correct -was 19 P-K4 f R- 
Kt4 ; 20 R-BL Or 19 . . . R-B5; 20 R-K13* 

19 ... . RxRch 

20 KtxR Q-R5 

21 Q-K2 R-KB1 

22 Kt-Kt3 B-K1 

23 P-K4 .... 


Played very reluctantly, since it creates a 
terrible weakness at KB4. But otherwise Black 
simply plays . . . B-K13, . , , Q-Kt.4, * , . P- 
KR4-5 followed by . . . B-K5 w T ith an over- 
whelming position. An attempt by White to 
prevent this maneuver would be futile: 23 
R-Ktl, R-Kt.3; 24 R-KR1, RxRch! 25 KtxR 

(forced), B-R4 ; 26 Q-Q3 (forced), Q-K8; 27 
Q-Q2, Q-K18 3 28 P-B3, B~Kt3 with a winning 
game. 


23 ... , 


B-Kt3 


129 


130 


The Chess Review 


24 R-R3 P-QR4 

26 R-KB3 R-B5 

26 Q* B 1 p * * * 

White is reduced to passivity, yet Black can- 
not capture the KP now or next move because 
of RxR* 


26 , * . , Q“Kt4 

Threatening . . . P-KR4-5. Black’s play is 
admirable, 

27 Q-B1 Q-Kt5 

23 P-KR3 Q-R5 

29 K-R2 P-R4 

30 P-R3 . « * * 

Foreseeing the inevitable ending, White gets 
the P off the white square* 


30 * . . , Q-B3 

31 Q-B1 Q-Kt4 

32 G-B1 Q-R3 i 


Very fine, Now the threat is , . . F-KR5; 
34 Kt-B5, BxKt; 35 FxE t RxQE-P since Black’s 
Q is protected. Or 35 RxR., QxRch; 36 QxQ, 
PxQ; 37 PxB, K-B2; 38 K-Ktl, K-B3; 30 K-E2, 
KxP; 40 K-B3, PR5; 41 F-BS, P KKU etc. 

33 K-Ktl P-KR5 

34 RxR QxR 

35 QxQ PxQ 

36 Kt-K2 BxP 


Reshevsky 



Bernstein 


37 Kt-Q4 

Tlie great liquidation has left White with a 
lost ending; if instead 37 KLxP, BxBP; 38 Kt- 
KG t B-IU6; 39 KtxBP, BxP; 40 Kt-RS, P-QK14 
and wins (if 41 Kt-KtG, K-E2; 42 Kt-BS, K-B3; 
43 KtxP, K-K4 etc.). 


37 

i ■ 

K-B2 

42 

K-S2 

K-B3 

38 

Kt-Kt5 

BxBP 

43 

Kt-Kt6 

B.R3 

39 

KtxBP 

B-Q6 

44 

K-B3 

K-B4 

40 

Kt-R8 

P-Q Kt4 

45 

Kt-R8 

B-Q6! 

41 

PxP 

BxP 

46 

Kt-Kt6 

P-Kt4 


The position is “Zugzwangy” for White. 

47 P-R4 B-R3 

48 Kt-RB B-B5 

49 Kt-Kt6 B-Kt6i 

50 K”B2 K-K5 

White resigns. Although I fought hard, I 
couldn’t help being impressed during the game 
by Reshevsky's, masterly position play. 


This game urns awarded the prize for the 
best played game, 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 
(Notes by W. W* Adams) 

W. W. Adams M, Green 


White 

1 P-K4 P-QB4 

2 Kt-KB3 KLQB3 

3 P-Q4 PxP 

4 KtxP KLB3 


Black 

5 Kt-QB3 P-K3 

6 KtxKt QPxKt 

7 QxQch KxQ 

8 B-K Kt5 


•Sharper and stronger is 8 P-K5, Kt-Q4; 9 
Kt*K4. The text permits Black too easy a 


development. 


8 , , , , B-K2 

9 O-O-Och Kt-Q2 

10 BxBch KxB 

11 B-K2 P-K4 


12 R-Q2 Kt-B3 

13 KR-Q1 B-K3 

14 P-B3 KR-Q1 

15 Kt-R4 RxR 


White retains a modicum of initiative, but 
scarcely enough to be called an advantage. 

16 RxR R-Q1 

17 RxR KxR 

18 Kt-B5 B-B1 


Or simply IS . . . P-QKtS and White would 
have no way to win. 

19 B-B4 K-K2 

20 Kt-Q3 Kt-Q2 

This, however, begins to be a little uncom- 
fortable. 


21 P*QKt4 P-B3 

22 P*Kt3 Kt-BI 

23 P-B4 K-Q3 

Better perhaps would. have been 23 , , . BxP. 

24 P-B5 P-Q Kt3 26 K-K3 Kt-Q2 

25 K-Q2 B-Kt2 27 P-Kt4 Kt-BI 

It is d ill! cult to find a plan for Black* 27 
. . . F-QK14 (intending * . . P-B4) would be 
met by 28 R-K6* and if 28 . * , Kt-BI; 29. TU- 
BS with a winning position. 


28 P-KR4 P-KR3 

29 B-Kt8 B-B1 

30 P-B4 B*Q2 

31 P-B5ch K-B2 

36 B-R7 ? 


32 P-KK t5 RPxP 

33 RPxP P-Kt4 

34 P-Kt6 K-Q1 

35 Kt-BI B-K1 


Pressed for time and fearing the conse- 
quences of . * * Kt(or B)xKtP; White fails 
to observe that this move affords Black the 
liberating * * * B-B2* Black, however, also 
overlooks this opportunity. 

36 * , , . Kt-Q2 39 B-Kt8 Kt-R3 

37 Kt-Kt3 Kt-Ktl 40 P-R3 Kt-B2 

3$ Kt-BI K-K2 41 K-B3 

The commencement of a deep laid plot. 
White’s plan is to maneuver his K to K-R5, 
followed by Kt-QS-B2-Kt4-R6 and finally to 
KKt8 in order to attack simultaneously Black’s 
KBS and K2, the only square from which he 
can defend KB3 with his K. Due to the ne- 
cessity of preventing the advance of White's 
KKtp, Black's KKtP cannot capture either at 
KR3 or KBS* Meanwhile Black can do nothing 
but mark time* 


41 

■ * m r 

B-Q2 

46 

B-R2 

B-K1 

42 

K-Kt4 

B-K1 

47 

Kt-Kt4 

B-Q2 

43 

Kt-Q3 

BQ2 

48 

Kt-R6 

Kt-KI 

44 

K-R5 

B-K1 

49 

Kt-Kt8ch 

K-Bl 

45 

Kt-B2 

B-Q2 

50 

B-B7 

P-R3 



Aug. — Sept. 1940 


131 


Black’s only move to lose a tempo. White, 
therefore, loses a move with, his B in order 
to put Black in Zugzwang. 

51 B-R2 B-B1 

52 B-Kt3 . , , « 


Green 



Adams 


52 * . . . B-Q2 

It has been suggested that Black would have 
done better by 52 . . . B-Kf2, but White, I 
believe, would still win by the following pro- 
cess; 53 B-B7, B-Rl; 54 Kt-R6, Kt-B2 (if 54 
. , , PxKt; 55 BxKt, K-Kt2 ; 55 B-Q7, B-Kt£; 
57 R-K6, B-R1; 58 B-R8) ; 55 Kt-Kt4, K-K2; 
56 KtxKP, PxKt; 57 K-Kt5, P-R4; 58 P-B6ch, 
K-Bl ; 59 K-B5, PxKtP; 60 PxP, Kt-R3 ; 61 
KxP, KtxKtP; 62 PxPch, KxP; 63 K-Q6, Kt-Q6 ; 
64 P-K5 r KtxKP; 65 KxKt. B-Kt2 ; 66 KQ6, 
B-R3 (if 66 . . . P-Kt5 ; 67 B-B4); 67 KxP, P- 
Kt5; 68 K-Q6 and should win* 

53 B-B7 B-B1 

54 BxKt KxKt 


If : 54 . . 

. KxB; 55 KtxPch, PxKt; 56 K-R6, 

K-Bl ; 57 K-R7 and the KKtP Queens, 


55 BxP 

K-Bl 

63 K-Q2 

K-Kt3 

56 P-R4! 

PxP 

64 K-Q3 

K-B4 

5 7 BxP 

K K2 

65 K-B3 

K-Q3 

58 P-B6! 

K-Q3 

66 K-B4 

K-B2 

59 K-Kt4 

K-B2 

67 K-B5 

K-Ktl 

60 K-B3 

P-R4 

68 P-Kt6 

B-R3 

61 P-K15 

K-Kt3 

69 B-Kt5 

B-Kt2 

62 K-K3 

K-B4 

70 K-Q6 

Resigns 

Simple chess and 

''simple' 1 chess , 



SICILIAN DEFENSE 



(Notes by Fred Keinfeld) 


G, Littman 

F. Reinfeld 

White 

Black 


1 P-K4 

P-QB4 

5 Kt-QB3 

P-K Kt3 

2 Kt-K B3 

P-Q3 

6 P-KKt3 

B-Kt2 

3 P-Q4 

PxP 

7 B-Kt£ 

0-0 

4 KtxP 

Kt-KB3 

8 0-0 

B-Kt5 


The combination of White’s 3rd and 6th 
moves is rarely seen, for of the two ftanchet- 
toed Rs, Black's is obviously better off. Black’s 
last move is played to induce the advance of 
the KBP, which will create a weakness in 
White's position. 

9 P-B3 


10 B-K3 Kt-B3 

11 Kt-Q5 KtxQKt 

The advanced Kt was too strong. 

12 PxKt Kt-Kt5J 

Naturally not * , * KtxKt, which simplifies 
too much, The Black Kt eventually finds a 
good square at QB4* 

13 P-KB4 P-QR4 

14 P-B4 .... 

This and White's next move round out his 
Pawn position on the Q side in a manner which 
appeals to the eye. But Black is influenced 
by more practical considerations, 

14 ... . Q-B1 

15 P~Kt3 P-R5 

16 Q-Q2 Kt R3 

17 QR-B1 

Very plausible, but trouble is on the way. 

17 „ * . . PxP 

18 PxP Kt-B4 

Threatening . . . BxKt. If now 19 P-QKt4, 
BxKt just the same. 

19 Q-QB2 R-R6 

20 R-Ktl .... 

Losing the exchange, but. it was no longer- 
possible for White to come off scot-free. 


Reinfeld 



Littman 


20 ... . BxKU 

To give up such a beautiful B is almost a 
statutory crime; and Black debated with him- 
self earnestly to make sure that the following 
play was foolproof, 

21 BxB B-B4 

22 Q-B1 R-R3! 1 

Not 22 . . . R-R7 (the obvious move); £3 
P-QKt4, BxR; 24 QxB etc. 

23 R-Kt2 .... 

If 23 R-Rl, KtxP wins. Or if 23 P-QKt4, 
BxR etc. (Black's QR being safe!)* 

23 . . * * Kt-Q6 

24 Q-K3 KtxR 

25 BxKt 

Or 25 QxP, KtxP; 26 Q-R6, Kt-K4; 27 PxKt, 
PxP; £8 QxP, P B3 and Black’s material ad- 
vantage will ultimately assert itself. This was 
the variation which gave Black the most con- 
cern when he decided on his 20th move, 

25 * . . * R-R7 


B-Q2 




132 


The Chess Review 


26 R-B2 Q-B2 

27 P-R3 P-R4 

28 P-KKt4 .... 

Realizing that the game is lost, in the long 
run, White hopes to make something out of 
the weakened stale of Black’s K side. But 
the venture yields nothing outside of a litlie 
excitement. 

28 ... . PxP 

29 PxP BxP 

30 Q QB3 .... 

If 30 P-B5 r BxP; 31 RxB (if 31 Q-R6, RxB ! ) , 
RxB: 

30 , . . . P-B3 

31 B-K4 K-B2 


Black is terribly pressed for time (till move 
36), but realizes that he must “take steps,” 

32 B-Ktl R(7)-FM 

33 R-Kt2 Q-B4ch ! 

An Important interpolation, 

34 K B1 Q-B1 

35 Q-Kt3 R-R1 1 1 

Very cool! Despite the brief time left, 
Black sees that 35 . . . B-B4? allows a curious 
draw by 36 QxPchf! BxQ; 37 BxBch etc. 
After the text, if 36 QxB. U-R8ch wins easily, 

36 P-B5 BxP 

37 R-R2? .... 

A blunder, but the end was nigh, 

37 , . . * BxB 

Resig ns 


A tricky attack fails , 

SCOTCH GAMBIT 


(Notes by D, Pol land) 


A, S. Denker 


D. Polland 


White 


Black 


1 P-K4 

2 Kt-KB3 

3 P-Q4 

4 B-B4 

5 0-0 


P-K4 

KBQB3 

PxP 

B-B4 


Denker attempts to transpose into the Max 
Lange Attack, with which he has scored sev- 
eral victories. 


5 ■ , - ■ P-Q3 

6 P-B3 P-Q6 

The capture gives White a free game and a 
strong attack for the P. 

7 P-Q Kt4 B-Kt3 

8 P-Kt5 Kt-K4 

9 KtxKt PxKt 

10 B-R3 Q-B3 


As White threatens to tie up t.he Black 
pieces, this appears the only reasonable way 
of developing; it prepares for either , , , Kt- 
K2 and . , , 0-0 or . . . B-Q2 and , . . 0-0-0. 

11 QxP Kt-K2 

12 Kt-Q2 Kt^KtS 

Black decides to adopt the second plan men- 
tioned in the previous note, but wishes to in- 
vite weaknesses in White’s K side. Despite 
the menacing appearance of White’s Bs, Black 
has the stronger attacking position, 

13 K-R1 KPB5 

14 GgB2 P-KR4 

15 P~Kt3 .... 



POLLAND pensively ponders his score 

Practically forced, to stop , , . P-R5 and . . + 
Q-Kt3, which would open the position to Black’s 
great advantage. 

15,.,. Kt-R6 


Pol land 



Denker 


16 P-B4 B-Kt5 

Avoiding the inviting pitfall 16 , ♦ * P-RG; 
17 RPxP. Kt-B7 ch ; IS RxKt, QxR; 19 R-KR1, 
PxP; 2Q RxQ, BxR; 21 Kt-Bl, B-R6 ; 22 KtxP, 
BxKt; 23 PxB, B-BSch; 24 K-Ktl, BxB; 25 
Q-R4 3 and White has a winning position, 

But now the threat of . . . P-R5 forces im- 
mediate liquidation. If 17 Kt-R3, PxP; 18 
P-KG, QKt3 and White has no good defense. 

17 PxP Kt-B7ch 

18 RxKt? .... 

A gross blunder, but. the alternative looks 
bad: IK K-Ktl (if 18 K-K1.2, B-R6cli etc.), Q- 
Kt4 ; 19 RxKt (or 19 BxPch, KxB; 20 Kt-B4, 
K-Ktl; 21 KtxB, Kt R6ch etc,), BxRch; 20 
Kxli, P-RG or 20 . . . 0 0-0 gives Black a 
strong attack, 

18 ... . QxR 

19 R-K B 1 ? B-B6ch 

20 KtxB QxQ 

21 BxPch K-Q1 

22 P-K6 P-B4 

If 22 , . . Q-K 7 ; 23 P-KTch, K-B.l (23 . , . 
K-Q£? 24 Kt-K5ch and wins); 24 R-K6cli, K- 
KQ; 25 KL-Q2 and the Kt may not be cap- 
tured at once; hence the text. 

23 PxP e.p, PxP 26 R-B7 Q-K8ch 

24 B^Kt6 Q-K7 27 K-Kt2 Q-K7ch 

25 Kt-Q2 QxKt 28 K-Rl R-K1 



Aug. — Sept. 1940 


133 




Book Reviews 

THE YEARBOOK OF THE 
UNITED STATES CHESS FEDERATION 
Edited by George S. Barnes 
Annotated by Fred Reinfeld 
Flexible Cover — $1.00 Cloth— $1.50 

There are many reasons why this book merits 
the attention of American chess players. The 
four yearbooks of the American Chess Federa- 
tion were always an outstanding value, as 
their purchase price included all membership 
privileges for a year. The present volume is 
the fifth in the series* and the first published 
under the joint auspices of the two recently 
merged American federations. 

The games of the New York 1939 tourna- 
ment gained particularly distinguished char- 
acter from the presence of Fine and Reshevsky. 
The combination of these fine games with the 
thorough and witty notes of Reinfeld and the 
breezy comment of Morton, makes this year's 
Games Section an unusually attractive value. 

Even more valuable, perhaps, is the inclusion 
of the text of the International Chess Code. 
This is certain to be a boon to many amateurs; 
I can recall any number of instances of players 
being badly in need of a copy of these rules! 

Aside from all these inducements, purchase 
of the Yearbook enrolls one as a member of 
the United States Chess Federation. To sum 
up, everyone who is not a member can lend a 
hand in furthering chess interest in this coun- 
try, at very small cost, and at the same time 
he will obtain a useful reference work and a 
well annotated collection of delightful games. 

—I.A.H, 

MEET THE MASTERS 
By Dr. M. Euwe $2.00 

The purpose and content are just what the 
title implies. The masters to whom we are 
introduced are Alekhine, Capablanca, Botvin- 
nik, Reshevsky, Fine, Keres, Flohr and— the 
author. There are some forty notable examples 
of the play of these great masters, with anno- 
tations of an equally high order, Euwe knows 
so well how to combine the general with the 
specific, how to guide the reader without 
simplifying unduly, and how to explain com- 


Avoiding the last trap: 28 . . , E-B7; 29 F- 
K7ch* K-Q2; 30 P-K8(Q)ch t KxQ; 31 RxBch 
etc. — although 29 . , , K-B1; 30 B-B5ch, K-B2; 
31 P-K8(Q)ch, K-Kt3 wins also, 

29 P-K7ch K-B2 

30 R-B4 B-B7 

Resigns 


plicated play without boring or confusing the 
reader. 

But the most interesting feature of the book 
is probably the searching analysts of character 
and temperament which each player undergoes. 
Too little attention has been paid to the 
personalities of chess masters: they may not be 
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game which can give him great pleasure. By 
this I mean the appreciation of master games, 
which seem forbidding and lifeless to so many 
players. 

A book such as this one by Euwe is an ideal 
means for acquiring a taste for fine master 
chess, and is therefore highly commended. 

— F.R< 

FIFTY TWO-MOVE PROBLEMS 
By P, Wenman $.35 

A nicely printed collection of problems 
which provide considerable enjoyment at very 
slight cost. 


SENSATIONAL OFFER!! 

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The extraordinary character of this bar- 
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• Descriptions of important tour- 
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Take advantage of it at once to be 
certain of getting your set. 


134 


The Chess Review 


Keres-Euwe Match 


Euwe called this game an ff unfinished sym- 
phony of complications , n 

Match 1939-1940 
(Seventh Game) 

RUY LOPEZ 


(Notes by Dr. M. Euwe) 


Dr. M, Euwe 

White 


P, Keres 
Black 


1 P-K4 

2 Kt-KB3 

3 B-K15 

4 B-R4 

5 0-0 


P-K4 

Kt-QB3 

P-QR3 

Kt-B3 

B-K2 

-B2 


6 R-K1 

7 B-Kt3 

8 P“B3 

9 P-Q4 
10 P-Q 5 


P-Q Kt4 
P-Q3 
0-0 
B-Kt5 
Kt-QR4 

B3 


This advance is the indicated continuation. 

12 PxP KtxBP 

13 QKt.Q2 P-Kt5 


18 BxP .... 

White's position looks very good. If now 
18 . . f RxP ; 19 R-B3, R-Kt3 ; 20 B-Bl followed 
by the advance of the QRP. 


Keres 



A quiet continuation would be unfavorable 
for Black, to White will have a good game 
if he is allowed to bring his QKt to K3. 

14 B-R4 

An attempt to refute Black's last move. The 
sequel proves that the move is not bad but 
leads to a very complicated game. Simple 
and good was 14 PxP, KLxKtP; 15 B-Ktl. 

14 ... . R-B1 

15 BxKt PxP 

The necessary point of 13 . . . P-Kt5, 

16 B-Kt7 PxKt 

17 BxQP R-Ktl 


Euwe 

18 . . . . P-Q 41 

A very strong move, which gives the game 
a surprising turn. White's KP is menaced, 
and he cannot play 19 PxP, P-K5; 20 P-KR3, 
B-R4; 21 P-KKt4 ? PxKt because of the result- 
ing weakness of his K side. 

If instead 19 B-Q3, Black has a forced draw 
with 19 . . * PxP; 20 BxP, KtxR; 21 RxKt, 
BxKt; 22 PxB, RxP; 23 B B3 (if 23 R-K2, Q- 
Q6!)i QxQeh; 24 RxQ, RxP etc. White can 
avoid the draw only by inviting extreme 
complications. 



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Aug. — Sept. 1940 


135 


19 B-K2 


BxKt! 


Match 1939-1 940 


Not 19 . . . PxP; 20 KtxP. 

2D PxB 


(Second Game) 

RUY LOPEZ 


If 20 RxB, Black forces a draw with * . * 
PxP as in the analogous variation given above, 

20 . . . . B*B4 

Black must play for the attack. If 20 . . . 
RxP; 21 B-B3 followed by BxP and White 
obviously has the better game. 

21 R*Kt1 .... 

Guarding the KtP and threatening P-Kt4, 

21 . . . . PxPi 

This cannot very well be answered by 22 
PxP, for then follows 22 , , , BxPch! 23 KxB, 
KtxPch with advantage. 22 P*Kt4 would also 
have its drawbacks, for after 22 . . . R-Q5; 
23 B-K3 loses the KtP (23 . . . B-B6). 


22 

B-K3 

B-Q5 

23 

BxB 

PxB 

24 

B-B1 

Q-Q4 

25 

PxP 

KtxP 

26 

Q-B3 

P-B4 

27 

P-K13 

* ■ 


After a series of more or less forced moves, 
the situation has cleared somewhat. White's 
connected passed Ps on the Q side are a great 
advantage in themselves, but it. is difficult 
for him to exploit this advantage as long as 
the Qs are on the board. White's K side is 
exposed, giving Black the opportunity to op- 
erate with tactical threats. An objective 
judgment of this position is not easy to formu- 
late. 

27 ... , Q-R1 

B-B4 was threatened, 

28 P-QR4 R-Kt3 

29 QR-Q1 Q-R4?? 

A terrible blunder, which loses at once. 
After 29 . . . R-KtSch; 20 B-Kt2 (not 20 K- 
Rl? KtxP mate), Q-R4 the position would have 
been extremely interesting, 

30 BB4ch Resigns 

If 30 . . . K“R1 ; 31 RxKt wins a piece. 


Metropolitan Chess League Match 1940 
(Brilliancy Prize Game) 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 


Dr. J, Platz 


White 


1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K 3 

3 

Kt~QB3 

P-Q4 

4 

B-Kt5 

QK1-Q2 

5 

P-K3 

B-K2 

6 

K1-B3 

P-B3 

7 

Q-B2 

P‘QR3 

8 

R-Q1 

0-0 

9 

P-QR3 

p-m 

10 

P-KR4 

Kt-Kt5 

11 

B-B4 

P-KB4 

12 

B-Q3 

PxP 

13 

BxP 

Kt-Kt3 

14 

B-QR2 

Kt-Q4 

15 

P-K Kt3 

K-R 1 

16 

Kt-K5 

KKtxKt 


J. Korpanty 

Black 


17 

QBxKt 

B-Q3 

18 

Kt.K2 

BxB 

19 

PxB 

Q-K2 

20 

B-Ktl 

Q-KB2 

21 

R-Q4 

P-K Kt3 

22 

P-K Kt4 

B-Q2 

23 

Kt-B4 

QR-Q1 

24 

R-Ktl 

B-B1 

25 

Q-Q1 

P-B4 

26 

PxPl l 

PxR 

27 

KtxPch 

K-R2 

28 

KtxRch 

QxKt 

29 

PxPch 

K-R1 

30 

Q-Q3 

Q-K2 

31 

Q-Kt6 

Resigns 


P. Keres Dr. M. Euwe 

White Black 


1 

P-K4 

P*K4 

22 QxB 

Kt.BS 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-Q B3 

23 P-KKt3 

QR*KBt 

3 

B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

24 P-B3 

Kt-R4 

4 

B-R4 

Kt-B3 

25 Q-K3 

Kt-Kt2 

5 

0-0 

KtxP 

26 P-KB4 

R-K1 

6 

P-Q4 

P-QKt4 

27 Q-Q2 

R (2)-K2 

7 

B-Kt3 

P-Q4 

28 RxR 

RxR 

8 

PxP 

B-K3 

29 P-B5! 

PxP 

9 

P-B3 

B-K2 

30 Q-Kt5 

R-K4 

10 

QKt-Q2 

0-0 

31 Q-B6 

Q-Kl 

11 

Q-K1 

Kt-B4 

32 BxP 

KtxB 

12 

Kt-Q4 

Q-Q2 

33 RxKt 

RxR 

13 

B-B2 

P-B3 

34 QxR 

Q-K6ch 

14 

KtxB 

KtxKt 

35 K-Kt2 

P-B3 

15 

Kt-B3 

PxP 

36 K-R3 

Q-R3ch 

16 

KtxP 

KtxKt 

37 K-Kt2 

Q-Q7ch 

17 

QxKt 

B-Q3 

38 Q-B2 

Q.Q6 

18 

Q-R5 

P-Kt3 

39 K-R3 

Q-B5 

19 

Q-R3 

R-B2 

40 Q-B6 

QxRP 

20 

B-R6 

B-B5 

41 QxP 

Drawn 

21 

QR-K1 

BxB 





CORRECTION 



Myer Edel stein of Somerville, Mass,* sub- 
mits a valuable correction to one of the notes 
to the beautiful Euwe-Keres which appeared 
on Page 113 of the June-July issue. The note 
in question is to White's 31st mover "If 31 
Q-B2, R-KSch; 32 K-Kt2, R-KtSch; 33 K-B3, 
R-K 6 mate." Mr, Edel stein points out that 
this is incorrect, as White has 34 K-B2, but 
that "Black then wins with 34 , , . R-QB6ch; 
35 RxB, RxQch; 36 KxR, PxR," 


PENNSYLVANIA CHAMPIONSHIP 

The Pennsylvania State Chess Federation will 
hold its second annual state championship 
tournament over the Labor Day week-end at 
the Hotel William Penn, Pittsburgh's finest 
hotel, located on Grant Street in the "Golden 
Triangle," Prizes will be awarded upon com- 
pletion of the final round, and entry fees will 
not exceed $2.00, I. A. Horowitz, editor of 
The Chess Review, will be on hand to act 
as Tournament Director. Best games and tour- 
ney results will appear in our next issue. 

With entries expected from chapter dubs 
in all sections of the state, a large crowd of 
Keystone enthusiasts should be on hand at 
tournament time, 

The P. S. C, F., cooperating with the United 
States Chess Federation and the Correspondence 
Chess League of America, stands for the pro- 
motion of chess, and solicits the affiliation of 
all dubs in Pennsylvania. Secretaries of clubs 
are urged to get in touch with the P. S. C, F. 
secretary, W, M. Byland, 3244 Latonia Ave., 
Dormont, Pittsburgh, Pa, 


136 


The Chess Review 


NO CHESS COLUMN FOR CHICAGO 

It lias been something of a misfortune for 
American chess that Chicago, which is the 
second largest city in this country and has so 
many chess clubs, so many chess amateurs and 
such an excellent array of good players, lacks 
a chess column. Such a column would be more 
valuable than ever before, as it would re- 
inforce the efforts of the United States Chess 
.Federation to spread interest in the game. In 
a recent communication to the Chicago Tribune , 
one of its readers presented the case for chess 
very forcefully. 

From a Chess Devotee 

Melrose Park, 111., July 8.-— Just why is 
it that none of Chicago's newspapers has 
a daily article oil chess? New York and 
other American cities think it important 
enough to include a daily feature, yet. this, 
the second largest metropolis in the United 
States seems to be barren of chess de- 
votees I 

A game that has endured wars and the 
rise and fall of nations! A game whose 
greatest asset is that it is not a fad — but 
eternally popular because of its interest 
and the absence of luck in any outcome. 

Presumably, the greatest barriers have 
been its supposed difficult moves, plus the 
ill conceived fable that every chess game 
takes from a day to a week to finish. Ac- 
tually the moves are comparatively simple 
to learn, the game is as difficult as one 
cares to make it, and the game Rapid 
Transit is rapidly gaining foothold against 
the marathons that have perhaps helped 
to bring the game into its present disfavor. 

There is space for the daily crossword 
puzzle 87 % of your readers don’t work, 
and space* for the bridge problem 50% 
don't read — why not space for the chess 
lesson that might quite conceivably be 
read by 99% of your readers. It will be 
a feature that will interest the child as 
well as the adult. 

This is a call to arms, ye followers of 
Caissa! Long neglected, now may ye rise 
in revolt for what, is yours! Here is the 
move for a Ruy Lopez or a Reinfeld, 

Carl A, Pierson, 

This letter, admirable on the whole, contains 
one or two statements that require amplifica- 
tion. Thus, when the w f riter says that Chicago 
' seems to be barren of chess devotees, ” we 
take it that what he has in mind is that one 
would gather from the complete absence of 
chess matter from the Chicago newspapers that 
there are not enough chess players in that city 
to make a column worthwhile. If this is the 
view of Chicago newspapers, it is of course 
quite erroneous. 

Secondly, it is a bit optimistic to say that 
New York papers have a daily chess feature. 
The furthest advanced in that respect is the 
New York Post } which runs R. R. Bigelow’s 
splendid column three times a week. The Sun 


and the Brooklyn Daily Eagle have a column 
once a week, while the Times and Herald - 
Tribune have fairly thorough reports of large- 
scale tournaments and other important chess 
events. 


STEINER-WOLISTON MATCH 

Shortly before coming east to take part in 
the National Championship Tournament, Phil- 
ip Woiiston contested a match with Herman 
Steiner, The older and more experienced 
player had his hands full at the start ( 2-2 
after four games had been completed), but 
put on a spurt thereafter to win by 5-2 with 
no draws. 

Match 1940 
(Third Game) 

QUEEN'S COUNTER GAMBIT 
H- Steiner P. Woiiston 

White Black 


1 

P-Q4 

P-Q4 

12 Q-R4 

Q-K3 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K4 

13 R-Q1 

K-Ktl 

3 

QPxP 

P-Q5 

14 R-Q3 

P-KKt3 

4 

Kt KB3 

Kt-QB3 

15 P-R3 

P-B4 

5 

P-KKt3 

B-K3 

16 PxP e*p. 

KtxP 

6 

QKt-Q2 

Q-Q2 

17 KtxKt 

BxKt 

7 

B-Kt2 

B-K2 

18 B-Q2 

KR-Ktl 

S 

0-0 

B-KR6 

19 R-Kt3 

R-Q3 

9 

Kt-K4 

BxB 

20 P-B5 

R-Q4 

10 

KxB 

P-KR3 

21 Q-R6 

Kt-QI 

11 

P-QR3 

0-0-0 

22 RxPch 

Resig ns 


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THE CHESS REVIEW 

25 West 43rd Street : New York, N. Y* 


* 



Aug. — Sept. 1940 


Game Study 

An instructive ending with the heavy pieces. 

Marshall C« C* Championship 1939-1940 
SICILIAN DEFENSE 


(Notes by H h Seidman) 



E. Lasker 

H. Seidman 


White 


Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-QB4 

S 0-0 

P-QR3 

2 

Kt-KB3 

P-Q 3 

9 BxKtch 

BxB 

3 

P-B3 

Kt-KB3 

10 P-Q4 

0-0 

4 

P-K5 

PxP 

11 Kt-B4 

B-Kt4 

5 

KtxP 

QK1-Q2 

12 QKt-R3 

PxP 

6 

P-KB4 

P-K3 

13 QKtxB 

PxKt 

7 

B Kt5 

B-Q3 

14 KtxB 

QxKt 


15 B-K3 


Much better than 1o QxP, QxQ; 16 PxQ, 
R-R5 ; IT B-K3, Kt-Kt5; or 15 PxP, R-R5; 16 
B-K3, Kt-Q4 ; 17 B-B2, QxBP, 


15 4 . . . P-Kt5 

16 BxP PxP 

17 PxP KR-Q1 

IS Q-Kt3 Kt-Q4 

Or 22 K-Rl , Q-B3ch 

22 ... . 

23 QxP 

24 QFLKB1 

He prefers retaining 
RxP; 25 K-Kt2. 

25 P-Q R3 

26 Q-B3 

27 Q-R8ch 

28 P-QR4 


19 P-K13 R-R6 

20 Q-Kt2 KtxQBP 

21 BxKt Q-B4ch 

22 R-B2 

followed by . , . RxB. 

RxB 

R-B7 

P-R3 

the pressure to 24 . . . 

R(1)-Q7 

R-B6 

K-R2 

Q-K6 


Threatening . . . R(6)-B7. If then 30 Q-R3 t 
QxQ; 31 RxQ, R-Kt7ch and mate in two, or 
30 Q-Kt2, RxR; 31 RxR, R-E8ch winning the Q, 


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THE CHESS REVIEW 

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NEW YORK, N. Y. 


137 

29 Q-B3 

Q-Q5 

34 Q K3 

Q-Kt7 

30 Q-Kt7 

R (6)-B7 

35 Q- K4c h 

P-B4! 

31 Q-B3 

QxRP 

36 Q-B3 

RxP 

32 RxR 

RxR 

37 RxP 

R-QB7 

33 R.K1 

Q-Q5ch 

38 R-K1 

R-B6 

39 

Q-S2 

Q-Kt6? 



In time pressure Black was under the il- 
lusion that 40 K-KI.2 could not be played be- 
cause ol 40 . . . R-B7, overlooking the defense 
41 R-K2. 

Black should play 39 . , . R’E7; 46 Q-R3, 
Q-Q5ch! winning easily, e, g. 41 Q-K3, Q-Q4; 
43 R-K2, Q-QSch; 43 R-Kl (if 43 K-B2 all the 
pieces are exchanged with a won ending), 
Q-R4 ! and White is lost; or 41 K-Bl (41 K-Rl, 
Q~Q7), R-B6; 32 Q-B2, Q-Q6ch winning the KtP 
(43 K-Kt2, R-B7). 

40 K-Kt2 Q-Q4ch 

41 K-R2 Q-Q6 


Seidman 



Lasker 


White's best drawing chance is now 42 R-K2, 
R-B8; 43 R-Q3!! QK5; 44 Q-Kt2- h Q-K8; 45 
R-QB3! R-Q8 ; 46 R-K2, 

Notice that if here 45 R-K2 Black wins 
by 45 . . * Q-Q8 e.g + 46 K-R3, R-B7 3 47 RxR, 
Q-R4 male. Or 46 R moves, QR4 cli ; 47 Q-R3, 
R-RSch; or 46 P-Kt4, Q-Q5 (not 46 * * . PxP?? 
47 Q-K4eh with a draw); 47 Q-Kt3, R-E6 or 
47 R-KB2, PxP. 

There is a study like win after 45 R-QKt2 
or R-QR2; 45 . . . Q-Q8 ; 46 R K2, R-QR8 ; 
47 P-Kt4, Q-Q5; 48 Q-Kt3, Q-R5 ! I 49 R-KB2, 
Q-B3M White now has several defenses, all 
inadequate ; 

1 50 Q-Kt2, QxQch; 51 RxQ (51 KxQ, PxP), 

R-R5I 53 K-Kt3 (52 R-B2, PxP), R-R6ch; 53 
K-R4 t R-B6 winning another F* 

U 50 R-KKt2, Q-B8 ; 51 Q-KB3, QR8ch; 52 
K-Kt3, R-KKt8; 53 PxP (53 Rx;R, QxRch ; 54 
K-R3, PxPch; 55 QxP, QxQch and wins), RxR 
ch; 54 QxR, QxQch; 55 KxQ, K-Ktlj 56 K-B3, 
K-B2; 57 K-Kt.3, K-B3; 58 K-Kt4, P-R4ch; 59 
KxP, KxP winning. 

Ill 50 R-B3, Q-B8; 51 Q-K12, PxP; 52 R4B2, 
Q-K6 and wins. 

42 K-R3 R-B7 

43 Q-K3 

43 Q-Bl is the only drawing chance* 

43 , Q.Q4 

44 R-KKtl R.R7 

45 Q-QB3 Q-K5 


138 


The Chess Review 


46 Q-B5 R-QKt7 

Although 46 * * * P-Kt4 leads to a quick mate, 
Black planned the following finish; 46 * . * 
R-QKt7 ; 47 Q-QBS, R Q7 ; 48 Q-B5, R-QR7 ; 
49 Q-QBS, K-K13 and White is helpless against 
Q-B6 and Q^KT. On the 46th move it would 
not have been good to play * . . K-KL3 be- 
cause of 47 Q-QGch. K-R4; 48 Q-Q7 etc. 

47 Q-R5 Q-B7 

Resigns 


BRAZILIAN CHAMPIONSHIP 

The recent match for the Brazilian title 
between Dr. W. Cruz and O* Trompowsky 
resulted in a surprisingly easy victory for the 
former by the score of 5-1 and one draw. The 
sixth game, given below, was the best one of 
the match. 

Match 1940 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 
O. T rompowsky Dr. W* Q* Cruz 

White Black 


1 P-Q4 

P-Q4 

19 QxPch 

B-K3 

2 Kt-KB3 

Kt-KB3 

20 Q-R5 

B-Kt5 

S P-B4 

P-K3 

21 Q-R4 

P-B5 

4 Kt-B3 

B-K2 

22 P-R3 

BxKtch 

5 B*Kt5 

0-0 

23 KxB 

PxPch 

6 P-K3 

QKt-Q2 

24 PxP 

R-B7 

7 R-B1 

P*B3 

25 P“KKt3 

B-Kt5 

8 Q-B2 

Kt-K5 

26 KR-K1 

QR-KB1 

9 P-KR4? 

P-B3 

27 Q-B4ch 

K-R1 

10 B-B4 

P-K4 \ 

28 K-Q1 

6-K3 

11 B-R2 

KtxKt 

29 Q-B5 

Q-Q21 

12 QxKt 

P-K5 

30 K-Q2 

B-Kt5 

13 Kt-Q2 

P-KB4 

31 R-B2 

Q-KB2 

14 PxP 

PxP 

32 Q-B4 

Q-B6 

15 Q-Kt3 

Kt-B3 

33 R-B3 

P-KR3! 

16 B-K5 

B-Q3I 

34 K-Q1 

RxB! 

17 B-K2 

Q-K21 

Resigns 


18 BxKt 

RxB 




STATE CHESS MAGAZINES 

One of the most hopeful indications of a 
rise in chess interest is the appearance of 
magazines devoted to chess activity in specific 
states. Among these are Jersey Chess, whose 
managing editor is Walter Wooton (271 Ivy 
Street, Arlington, N. J.), with J, B, Snethlage 
and Harold Burdge as contributing editors— 
and the Wisconsin Chess Letter, edited and 
published by Fritz Rathmann (4124 South 
Austin St., Milwaukee, Wis.). 

Both magazines are written in a lively style, 
contain annotated games, and give particulars 
about chess activity throughout the state. We 
can therefore warmly recommend them to the 
attention of all chess players in their respective 
states. The subscription to each magazine costs 
$1.00 per year. 

If editors of other state chess publications 
will tell us about their magazines, we shall 
be glad to give details in The Chess Review. 


CALIFORNIA: NORTH vs. SOUTH 

For the fourth consecutive year, the North- 
ern cohorts carried off the palm of victory, the 
current score being the most decisive of the 
series. It's no small task,” Wallace H. Smith 
comments, "to get so many players to go so 
far (San Luis Obispo, site of the match, is 240 
miles south of San Francisco), and 1 think 
Leslie Boyette, captain of the North, deserves 
special credit for his efforts m getting out a 
strong team. 11 

Individual results; 


Bd. 

North 

South 


1. 

Barlow __ 

__ , Q 

Steiner 

1 

2. 

Fink 

1 

Kovacs 

0 

3. 

Simon 

1 

Spero 

0 

4. 

Clarke 

. 1 

Elliott. 

0 

5. 

Howland 

_______ 0 

Pobsevage, Jr. ___ 1 

6. 

Pafnutleff 

% 

Grab ill ...... 

a 

7. 

Vedensky 

1 

Syvertsen ... 

o 

3. 

McClain _ 

0 

Levitan 

i 

9. 

Lapikeu _ 

1 

P. D. Smith . 

0 

10. 

Lewis 

. 0 

Jaqua ... 

1 

11. 

Capps 

1 

Erickson .... 

0 

12. 

Ralston 

- — Ys 

G. Reinhardt 


13. 

Fawcett «. 

1 

Hall 

0 

14. 

Boyette ... 

— 0 

Keys 

1 

15. 

Christensen 1 

Spiller 

— 0 

16. 

Hendricks 

1 

Aronson 

0 

17. 

W. H. Smith 1 

Donnelly 

0 

IS. 

Robinson 

1 

Chernis 

0 

19. 

Ekoos 

1 

Dobsevage, Sr 

' o 

20. Ruys 

- — % 

Fuglie 

— % 

21. 

Falconer _ 

1 

Hufn agel 

.... 0 

22. 

Hong 

.. 1 

Cohen 

0 

23. 

Arvi neus _ 

1 

W. Reinhardt 

— _ 0 

24. 

Van Gelder 1 

Henderson 

.... 0 

25. 

Abrahams 

1 

Crofut 

0 



18*4 


6*4 


Simultaneous Exhibition, Tulsa 1939 


SICILIAN 1 

DEFENSE 



1. A. Horowitz 

Roddy 



White 


Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-QB4 

21 QxKt 

B-B4 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

22 Q-Q4 

KR.Q1 

3 

P-Q4 

PxP 

23 QxQ 

RxRoh 

4 

KtxP 

KUKB3 

24 Q-Ktl 

QxQch 

5 

Kt-QBS 

P-Q3 

25 KxR 

BxKP 

6 

B-K2 

P-KK13 

26 B-Q2 

RxP 

7 

0-0 

B-Kt2 

27 R-K1 

BxP 

8 

Kt-Kt3 

B-Q2 

28 BxP 

B-K3 

9 

P-B4 

0-0 

29 R-K3 

R-B5 

10 

B-B3 

R-B1 

30 B*Q6 

RxP 

11 

Q-K2 

KLQR4 

31 K-B1 

R-B5 

12 

R-Q1 

Kt-B5 

32 Kt-R5 

R-B8ch 

13 

K-R1 

P*QKt4 

33 K-K2 B-Kt5eh 

14 

P-QR4 

P-Kt5 

34 K-Q2 

R-QSch 

15 

Kt-Kt5 

Q-Kt3 

35 K*B2 

RxB 

16 

Kt(5)-Q4 

P-K4 

36 KxB 

R-Q7ch 

17 

Kt-Kt5 

P-QR3 

37 K.B3 

RxP 

18 

KtxP 

KtxKt 

38 P-R3 

BpK3 

19 

PxP Kt(B3)xP 

39 Kt-B6 

R-KR7 

20 

BxKt 

QxB 

Resigns 



Problem Department 

By Vincent L* Eaton 

Address all correspondence relating to this department to V.L< Eaton, 2237 Q Street f N.W. f Washington, D.C> 
Questions About Problem Matters Will Be Answered If Accompanied By Return Postage, 


In this month’s selection, Nos. 1636-1651 are 
originals, and Nos, 1652-1662 are illustrations 
for Mr, White's article, which continues below. 
Nos, 1636-1653, inclusive, will be scored on the 
Solver's Ladder, As explained before, the ini- 
tials “G," and "W” above a problem in- 

dicate that it was selected for publication by 
F. damage, Com ins Mansfield, or Alain White, 
respectively. 

Composers seem to be taking long summer 
vacations, and my stock of originals Is getting 
very low. All appearances to the contrary, 
notwithstanding, I don't very much like filling 
the diagrams with my own work, and I hope 
that composers will rally around to prevent 
a repetition of such a calamity * * . if not for 
my sake, at least, for the solvers’! 

No. 1647 brings back an old friend to the 
composing ranks, after several years’ absence* 
Veteran solvers will remember the fine prob- 
lems Mr, Mo wry submitted when the Review 
was considerably younger. Special attention 
is also called to Dr. Keeney's piquant self-mate, 
No, 1650 * , . the type of problem almost every- 
one likes, 

# # !# # # 

As we go to press, we learn that Geoffrey 
Mott-Smith has accepted the editorship of the 
Chess Correspondent problem department, suc- 
ceeding the Hochberg brothers. "Geoff' is an 
experienced editor and a fine composer, and 
it is hard to think of a better choice for the 
post. 

Miss Pauline Papp is conducting the problem 
section of the Mid-West Chess and Checker 
News, The first issue has just come to Grand, 
with a good selection of twenty-four original 
and quoted problems. 

He * * * $ 

SIXTY TWO-MOVERS OF THE 
PAST SIXTY YEARS 

Part III 

By Alain C. White 

The blending of two or more motives was 
taken up almost from the start of the period 
1915-1930, and many compositions of the great- 
est intricacy and beauty soon resulted* There 
were unpins with self-blocks, as in No. 1652, 
and unpins in combination with interferences 
and half-pins (No. 1653) ; and half-pins in every 
imaginable association, with crosschecks (No, 
1654), with unpins (Nos. 1655 and 1656), with 
interferences (No* 1657), and an endless se- 
quence of other multiplied effects. Problems 
of this general style became more and more 
entrenched without serious competition until 
the close of the 1920’s, when there suddenly 
flashed across the Chess sky a meteor of extra- 
ordinary splendor in the person of J, A, Schiff- 
mann* His problems were quite in the tradi- 
tion of the preceding ten years, if anything 
rather simpler in their materials. I-Iis No, 1634 
has already been mentioned. It is an example 
of mates by two unpinned White pieces; but 
there Is something about the key-move — 
changing the mate after a threatened Black 


check — and the open construction, that made 
his problem seem entirely personal. No. 1653, 
another of his unforgettable two-movers, de- 
pends on nothing more elaborate than a cross- 
check and a couple of White shut-off mates. 
No, 1659 involves mutual Black Rook and 
Bishop interferences. Nos, 1660 and 1661 each 
have two Black flight squares and two White 
Knight batteries, with a couple of Black self- 
blocks in the former, There is not an extreme 
effect in any of these problems, and yet it 
seemed as if they had expressed in a few vari- 
ations all that the composers of the entire 
period had dreamed of strategy and beauty. 
Death carried Schiffmann away at what seems 
to us the height of his creative powers and 
we shall never realize to what greater com- 
positions he might have advanced. But his 
passing seemed to foreshadow some change in 
the ideals of composition, if the two -mover 
were to continue in the universal popularity it 
had attained, 

Until 1930 the themes and blendings of 
themes we have been reviewing were in the 
main very direct* In the majority of cases 
Black made his thematic defense in response 
to a White threat and in doing so laid himself 
open to a mate, by reason of some direct in- 
herent weakness in his defensive move — 
which might involve an unpin, a self-pin, an 
interference, or what not. In so beautiful and 
complicated a problem as No, 1657, Black's 
defenses defeat the simple White threat in 
almost elementary manner. The key 1 Sd7 
sets us the threat 2 Sb6; and to defeat this 
the Black Queen, in one variation, captures 
the Pawn at f3, opening a flight at: e4, While 
making this simple defense. Black quite in- 
cidentally manages to self-pin both the Qf3 
(direct self-pin) and the Be5 (half-pin), per- 
mitting a beautiful double pin mate, 2 Sxf6, 
In the variations 1 . * * Bf4 and 1 . * , Bg3, 
there follow combined half-pins of the Black 
Queen and interferences in turn of the two 
Black Rooks, leading again to delightful mates. 
But the actual defeat of the threat ensues 
simply from the removal of the Black Bishop 
from e5, which would permit the Black King 
to escape by that square if White continued 
his threat. This problem well illustrates the 
beautiful effects rendered possible by intricate 
Black self-restrictions, arising quite inciden- 
tally in the attempt to defeat a White 
threat in a purely direct manner, Compara- 
tively few problems of this entire period had a 
defense as strategic in itself as the famous 
1 . * * Sg3 of No. 1622. 

But defenses of deeper significance were 
gradually being introduced, revealing new in- 
tricacies whose full possibilities were still 
hardly suspected. There is, for instance, a 
charming thought in No. 1652. Here, after the 
key, if the Black Queen should unpin the White 
Knight at b7* White might try to mate by a 
double-cheek at c5 or <16, if it were not that 
these moves would shut off the action of one or 
the other of the White Rooks, permitting the 


139 


140 


Thb Chess Review 


Black King to escape at e5 or d4. But if the 
Black Queen, while trying to defeat White's 
threat, were to self-block these squares, then 
indeed the unpinned White Knight could mate 
by one of the moves indicated. Especially in- 
teresting is Black's defense 1 , . . Qd4, because 
it cuts off the guard of the White Rook from dZ. 
This is a kind of "compensating” move, bring- 
ing thematic advantage and disadvantage si- 
multaneously. It is advantageous to Black 
to shut off the White Rook's guard in this 
manner, and it is disadvantageous to Black 
that the same move provides a self-block on 
the same line and permits the mate. In the 
companion variation, 1 , . , Qe5, there is no 
similar compensating play. Black moves his 
Queen in this case simply to defend directly 
against the threat, not to obstruct the White 
Rook. 

What the composers of the 1920's were work- 
ing towards and what those of the I930 j s have 
realized so brilliantly is the concept of com- 
panion variations with compensating play. No. 
1662 was a complete example of this, or very 
nearly so. The key is 1 Ra3, threatening 2 
PxP mate. Black can defend by moving either 
Knight, opening file guard of the Black Queen 
or Rook upon E3, but at the same time per- 
mitting a new contingent threat to come into 
operation — ■ 2 Bd5, To offset this, Black has 
two thematic "corrections,” 1 + , , SeG and 1 
* . . Sf6* These moves unpin the White Queen 
and at first glance seem to allow her to mate 
at either d5 and e5 or e5 and e7 accordingly; but 
now we see the compensating effect of Black's 
moves, which in turn shut off each of the two 
White Bishops, so that White must mate by 2 
Qe7 after 1 * . . ST6 and by 2 Qe5 after 1 + * . 
Se6 + The mates are further rendered effective 
by the half-pins which also result from Black’s 
moves. Thus in each variation there is a Black 
line-opening to defeat the original threat; plus 
shut-offs of the White Bishops to defeat the 
contingent threat and to make the White mates 
accurate; plus supplementary unpins of the 
White Queen and hall-pins of the companion 
Knight. 

(To be continued) 


INFORMAL LADDER 

(Maximum score for Nos. 1573-1590: 91 points; 
for Nos. 1600-1617: GO points). 

T. McKenna 897 f 50, 40; *W. Patz 852, 39, 40; 
fc,***p j_^ Rothenbcrg 798, 57, 50 (The Hoch- 
berg memorial idea is excellent; should like 
to feature it when the White articles end); 

H annus 731, 60, 33; A, Tauber 635^ 83, 50 
(Many thanks for the new original) ; G, Fairley 
643, 60, 50; K. Lay 639; A. A, J, Grant 509, 46, 
50; J. M. Dennison 503, 46, 48; ****Dr. G. 
Dobbs 531, 68 (Hope that you are now feeling 
hale and hearty); *1. Burstein 594; Dr. M. 
Herzberger 500, 42 (Let’s hear from you more 
often, Max); B, M. Marshall 443, 21, 30 (The 
new original is fine. \ thought you would enjoy 
the White articles); P, A, Swart 392, 57, 42; 

EL Daly 355, 63, 50; Dr, W, F. Sheldon 
423; *Or, P, G, Keeney 352; Korpanty 232, 
64, 50; R. Neff 246, 46, 44; I. Sapir 328; ****G, 
Plowman 205, 68, 50; J. Donaldson 218, 42, 46; 
C, E. Winnberg 143, 53, 50; Rivise 150, 

64, 48; E. Popper 239; B. L, Fader 109, 68, 50 
(Good work); S H P, Shepard 176, 35; A. Fortier 


197; --A, Sheftel 78, 62, 50; A. B. Hodges 103, 
59; J. Hudson 61, 40, 37; W. C, Dod 115, 51, 40 
(Thanks for the ideas for articles; will try 
to use some of them when the White essay 
ends. Will write about the other matters you 
mention); T. Lundberg 36, 48, 45; A. D. Gibbs 
76, 41; C. Lawrence 42, 46; J. Dub in 48, 37; 

Edelstein and T. F, Burke 45 (Welcome!); 
W, R, Ellis 36; R. W. Hays 29, 6; F. Grote 
28; T. L. Goddard 24; Claude Du Beau 16 
(Welcome to the Ladder, and many thanks 
for the originals. Shall feature the Barry mem- 
orial when space permits); I. Hart 15 (Wel- 
come!); t3! *F« Sprenger — ; O. Jens — ♦ 

+E ^ # Jfl # 

Congratulations to Tom McKenna, who 
reaches the summit of the Ladder this month, 
and Otto Wurzburg, whose beautiful echo 
three-er. No. 1579, was judged the best of last 
quarter's offerings. 


SOLUTIONS 
APRIL PROBLEMS 

No. 1573 by R, C. Beito: 1 Se4 (Two points) 

Mutate, with added mate- — Marshall. Fine 
mutate, with exceptionally nice key — 
Ro then berg. Three changed, 1 added 
mate, in a well -const rue ted mutate — 
Gibbs, 

No. 1574 by Will C. Dod: 1 Bd3 (Two points) 

Excellent. Meredith, showing almost com- 
plete White Knight wheel, with small 
force — Gibbs. Complete, delectable Knight 
wheel in economic setting, with cross- 
check and shut-offs — Ro then berg. 

No. 1575 by Dr. Gilbert Dobbs: 1 S(dfi)xe4 (Two 
points) 

Multitude of excellent pin -variations — 
Ro then berg. Complex Schiffmann task 
well executed— Fairley, Obscure key per- 
mits good, typically modern self- pinning 
defen ses — Gibbs, 

No. 157 ft by The Problem Editor: 1 Kel (Two 
points) 

No. 1577 by Dr. P. G. Keeney: 1 SbS (Two points) 
Delicate lightweight with surprising block 
situation— Gibbs. A sort of “smothered 1 ' 
mate — Marshall. Plenty of action for a 
Me r c d it h — R ot hen berg. 

NO, 1678 by Aurel Tauber: 1 Qh2 (Two points) 

Fine Meredith crosschecker, with the- 
matic flight-giving key and Tauber's 
familiar accuracy and economy— Gibbs. 
Two long-range crosschecks— Marshall. 

No. 1579 by Otto Wurzburg: 1 Sa3 (Three points) 
1 . . . Kc5; 2 Sxc2. 1 . P . Kd4 ; 2 S&4. 

1 ... Pci (Q); 2 RdSeh, 1 , , , Pol (S) 
or else; 2 Rh5ch, 

A masterpiece of economy and symme- 
trica] perfection — Rothenberg. Complete 
model motes. Very pretty — - Marshall. 
One of the most ingenious problems I 
have ever solved — Herzberger. Superb 
set of echoes — Fairley. (Hearty thanks 
to Mr. Wurzburg for a much -appreciated 
dedication— Editor.) 

No. 158(1 by Thomas S, McKenna: Intended 1 Ba5; 

2 Bel and 2 Rd2 r but the fact that the 
White King is free for waiting moves 
allows 9 cooks — hy 1 Bel- or IK to any 
square. 4 points for author’s intention; 
4 points for claim of 1 Bel; 4 points for 
claiming IK to a specific, square and 1 
point each for claims of IK to additional 
squares than the first one mentioned.) 
The author corrects by shifting the WK 
to b2, adding WP 18, BP f 1 . 

No, 1581 by Dr. Gilbert Dobbs: 1 Rd5 F Pe3; 2 Qf4ch, 
Rg4; 3 Sdl, RxQ ; A BdSch, RfG; 5 Rd2, 
(Five points) 

Original position hardly suggests the 
fin ale — -Rothen berg. Interesting maneu- 
vering of cumbersome White force — 
Fairley, 

No. 15S2 by P. L. Rot hen berg and the Problem 
Editor: 1 Pa8 (S) (Three points) 
l . . . Pb6; 2 Sbfi. In the. try 1 Pa 8 (Q), 
Black replies 1 . . . PbG and White has 
no waiting move* 


Aug. — Sept. 1940 


141 


No. 1636 
F. GAJVI AGE 
Brockton, Mass, 
(Contributed b y J.B. Sneth.lage) 



Mate in 2 


No. 1637 

DR, P, G. KEENEY 
Bellevue, Ky. 
Dedicated to Will C. Bod 



Mate in 2 


No. 1638 

GEOFFREY MOTT-SM I TH 
New York, N. Y. 



EITHER SIDE mates in 2 


Original Section 


No. 1639 

W. B, SUESMAN 
Cranston, R, I, 



Mate in 2 


No, 1640 

F, W, WATSON 
Toronto, Canada 



Mate in 2 


No. 1641 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 



Mate in 2 


No. 1642 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 



Mate .in 2 


No. 1643 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 



Mate m 2 


No. 1644 

CLAUDE DU BEAU 
Stockton, N. J. 


ASs 

ifl® 

■"■fi 

lf«® 

I \ 

!?■" 


sV; 


Mate in 3 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE SEPTEMBER 20th, 1940 















142 


The Chess Review 


Original Section (cont'd) 


No. 1645 No, 1648 

CLAUDE DU BEAU THE PROBLEM EDITOR 


Stockton, N. J. 



Mate i]i 3 Mate hi 4 



No. 1651 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 

(Suggested by No, 1650) 



SELF-mate in 5 


No, 1646 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 



Mate in % 


No. 1649 
L. W. WATSON 
Los Angeles, Cal, 


No, 1652 (G, M, W) 

A, ELLERMAN 
First Prize, Luigi Centurmi, 
Genoa, 1925. 



SELF-mate in 5 


Tn 



Mate In 2 


No, 1647 
H + CL IVTOWRY 


No, 1650 

DR, P, G, KEENEY 


No, 1658 (M.) 

A. MAR! 


Malden, Mass. 



Mate in ?/ 


Bellevue, Ky, El Ajedrez Argentine^ 1926, 



8ELP-mate in 5 Mate in 2 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE 


SEPTEMBER 20th, 1940 




















Aug. — Sept. 19 4 0 


143 


Quoted Section 


No. 1654 (M) 

G. GUIDELLI 

First. Prize, I/Fco Begli 
ScaecM. 1917. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1655 (G) 

G. GUIDELLI 
First Prize, Brisbane 
Courier, 1917. 



Mate in 3 


No. 1656 (M) 

C. w. SHEPPARD 

First Prize, Good Companions, 

1921 


gfyg 


ill 

Sif 

m & h 

UK jjg§ 


■ ■ i 


Mate in 3 


No, 1657 (M) 

A, ELLER MAN 

First Prize, Good Companions, 

1921 



Mate in 2 


No. 1658 (G, M, W) 

J, A, SCH1FFMAN N 
First Prize, Bristol Times 
and Mirror, 1927. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1659 CG) 

J, A, SC H IFF MAN N 
First Prize, Brisbane 
Courier, ,1.929. 



Mate in 3 


No. 1560 (G, W) 

J. A. SCHIFFMANN 

First Prize, London 
Observer, 1928, 



Mate in 2 


No. 1661 (G, M, W) 
J. A. SCHEFFMANN 
First Prize, British 


Chess Problem Society, 1930 



Mate in 2 


No, 1662 (W) 

G. GUIDELLi 


Good Companions., 1918. 



Mate in 2 


THESE PROBLEMS ARE NOT SCORED ON THE SOLVERS' LADDER 










144 


This Chess Review 


No* 1SS3 by P. Is. Rothonberg; i PhB (S) (Three 
points) 

1 * . * FgC; 2 KxgG. 

The new Knight. is necessary to capture 
I Si* at fi'ii and produce smothered mate. 
— Ra.tx, 

No, 1 s> S -1 by P. B. Rot hen berg: Intention 1 PaS (S) 
followed hy 3 \\ K 1 S or BxS. Cooked 
by 1 PaS (Q) or I PuN {R) r Sb6: 2 FxS, 
Also bv 1 Ku5 or Sd3 (Three points each). 
No. 15S5 by P. B. Rolhcnberg: 1 Pu£ (S) (Three 
points) 

1 , . , B moves; 2 P. S f or QxB. 

Good semi -grab of Black Bishop cleverly 
worked with underpromot ion— Fairley. 

No. 15SG by P. I,. Rot lumbers: 1 PfS (S) (Three 
points) 

1 . . . u moves: 2 B, or PxR 

The key, completing the “grab coverage” 
of the Black Rook, produces a fine effect 
— Gibbs. (Note the complete block effect 
of the position, and the many balanced 
tries — Bd U or. ) 

No. 1 587 by the Problem .Editor: Intended 1 PaS 
(S), but there arc cooks by 1 Kb7 and 1 
Kd7 (Pour i joints each). 

No, 1588 by P. Ij. Rot henberg : intended 1 PeS (S) 
but there is an unexpected cook by l 
Qe2 (Three point h each). 

No, 1589 by P r L. Rot hen berg: 1 Pd 8 (S) (Four 
points) 

X . . . Qa7: 2 Sb7. 1 . . . Q moves; 2 
K, R a li t uS or PxQ. 

No, 1590 by P. L, Ro then berg: X Pc 8 (S) (Three 
3 joints) 

3 . . . PbG; 2 Sd6. 

As the composer says, the clearance of 
the seventh rank is surprising’ — Gibbs. 
No, 1591 by Sam Boyd: 1 PxB (S), KxP; 2 SbG! 

No, 1 e 192 by Sain Boyd: 1 PxH (S), Ra.fl; 2 Sbfi] 

No. 1993 by Sam Boyd: 1 PhS (S), Ph4; 2 Sf7I 

No. 1594 by Stun Boyd: I QaS, BfG; 2 PgS (S) ; 8 

SxB or 3 SxQ. 

No. 1595 by W. A. Shi nk man: 1 Pb$ (SR Kxc6; 2 
SxS. 1 , , , S else; Z P or QxS. 

No, 15% by W. A. Shin k man : 1 PaS (S) + RgTch; 

2 SuG-o7* Rg2; 3 Sxb6. 1 , , . Pb5; 2 
SaS-e7, Phi: 3 Kxbl. 

No. 1597 by H. and J. Belt maim: 1 Pe8 (S), Be7; 
2 SdG. 1 * . . B(T7; 2 Sf6. 

No. 1598 by E. Kerb or: 1 Ph?S (S), Pg4; 2 Sf7. 

No. 1599 hy H. Wiuwer: 1 Pc 8 (S), Kcl; 2 Sa7! 1 
, „ , Bh 11; 2 SpK'h. 

Another enjoyable essay, which has my 
appreciai ton. The problems, while natu- 
rally eiifty io solve, show the high quality 
to be expected of Mr. Rothcnberg — Gibbs, 
Talk of "painting I he lily ” , , + Rothen- 
bev g has sur passed Boyd! I wonder if 
1 might have solved one or two of the 
studies in this inimitable net had they 
appeared singly and without the key— 
KcKemiii. This series is of considerable 
Interest — Pod, An excellent group of 
pr ob i e m s— Fa i r I ey . 

(MAY PROBLEMS) 

No. 1600 by Dr, Gilbert Dobbs: 1 Sf-ixd3 (Two 
points) 

T?x c to p ( i on ally a cc u ra i e c ro a sell e c k p 1 ay 
—Ro l h e n b e rg. 10 x t ;« 3 1 en t <■ h a n go d m at es 
and good crosschecks— Pate, Interference 
variety is most attractive— Marshall. 

No-. 1601 by Will C, Dod: 1 SdG (Two points) 

The line shui-off play 3 s very good— 
Patx. Fine Knight wheel In economic 
setting— Rot hen herg. A nice White wheel 
— Dn 13o.au, Pretty shut-offs accomplished 
by the White Knights — Marshall, 

No, 1602 by Claude Du Beau: 1 Qal (Two points) 
Opposition duel of White Queen and 
Black Rook— Rot hen borg. Waiter with 
good sacrificial key— Fair lev. 

No. 1603 by the Problem Editor: 1 Sfr> (Two points) 
Changed males from the Queen to the 
two Knights — -Marshall, Restrictive gift- 
horse key by an Indian giver should be 
looked in the mouth!— Dod, 

No. 1694 by Dr, P. O. Keeney: 1 Ku7 (Two points) 
Crosscheck and interference arc good— 
Pate, Double opening of valves — Mar- 
shall. 

No, 1605 by Burney Ml Marshall: 1 Rhl (Two 
points) 

The crosscheck is I he main feature— 
I ate, r mo key leading to a wealth of 


good variations — -Ro then berg. A well- 

hidden key — Du Beau, 

No. 1G0G by Geoffrey Mott- Smith; 1 Kb 6 (Two 
points) 

Triple Pawn-action in a. delectable mini- 
ature— Rot hen berg, Pretty models with 
the White Pawn as protagonist — F a ir ley. 

No, 1607 by Geoffrey Molt -Smith: For White, 1 
Bd5, For Black, 1 * , , Bc3, (Two jxjints 
each.) 

NieC““Dod. Good results from a dilhcult 
constructive t ask— Fairley. 

No. IGuS hy F. W. Watson: 1 Re2 (Two i>oints) 

Another nice crosscheck — Fate. Unpre- 
tentious imitate — RoLhenberg. Excellent 
mutate* changing the main mate — Mar- 
shall. 


No. 1GG9 by C, B. Cook: 1 KbG (Three points) 

1 . , . Kb3; 2 Kcf> 

Indian effect with tries galore — Rothen- 
berg. Perhaps the Pawn at di could 
have been dispensed with by placing the 
WK at. a7, thus making the problem 
a miniature — McKenna. Simplified In- 
dian p rob 1 a n \ — ■ M a rs h a t L 

No. 1619 by the Problem Editor; 1 1T8 (S) (Three 
points) 

1 . . , B moves; 2 K r B, f> or PxB, 

No. 1611 by A, J. Fink: 1 Qft (Three ]>oints) 

1 . , . Kb 6; 2 CRxPch. 1 . , , KxS; 2 
Qf2ch. 

Splendid key in typical Fink offering. 
The Queen sacrifice is a delight — Ro th- 
en berg, A fine problem. Interesting 
how l be models evolve from a heavy 
White force — Fairley, 

No. 1613 by Aurel Tauber: 1 Qf6 (Three points) 

I . , , BbS ; 2 QhS 

A hesitation switchback, in which the 
short male is apparently inevitable — 
Rot hen berg, 

No. 1613 by Claude Du Beau: 1 Ke2 (Four ]>ohits) 

I I , . . Kd 4 or TCdfi; 2 SltSch; 3 Sho. 
1 - - . KM or Nf(J; 2 Sh5ch; ^ *Sb5. 1 
, . . Pd -I; 2 Rc5ch f Kd6: 3 Sxe^ch. 1 
. . . PfR 2 UgGch; KfG; 3 Sxc4ck. 

Very nice echoes, unusual for a four- 
mover — Pal ft, Sy mmet rieal pleasantry— 
Rolhenberg. I found iliis somewhat dite 
ferent and enjoyed it very much — Fader, 

No, 16U by Thomas 8. McKenna: 1 SeG (Four 
points) 


Kcl>; 2 Rb8, Kd7; % Se5ch. A lovely 
primary mate— Rot hen berg. Pretty key 
and hid Id -up lor the final mate — Fairley. 
No. 1615 by An rcl Tauber: 1 RhJS (Four points) 

1 . . . KxP; 2 RxS, Pe3; 2 Rh8, 3 . . 
else; A Kbfs. 1 . , , Ka5; 2 Rb3. 

Novel switchback maneuvering— Rothen- 
berg. Tauber certainly is a. master of the 
s w i f. c b bac k — McKenna. 

No. 1616 by F. W. Will son : L Rb2 (Two points) 

l b> u- Q , x B ; 1 QbTch. 1 , , . RxR; 2 
KxReh. 1 , . . 8cS; 2 Sd6ch. 1 , , , 
RxQ; 3 Sf8-d4 eh, 

Excellent variations— Pa tz. The key is 
confining, but the strategy and variations 
are goo d— Ito I he ri b e rg. C o n gratu 1 at i on s 
to Mr, Watson for the two finest prob- 
lems of the issue— Marshall. 

No. 1617 by C, B, Cook: j PdJi (Four points) 

1 . . . PxP; 2 Qd4, PxP; 3 Se3 r PxP; 
4 feg2. 

A single hue, bid a good one— Pate, 
Jacob s ladder” play— Marshall. 


EMPIRE CITY CHESS CLUB NEWS 

A, Friedman (5^-2^) and Dr. Farber 0-2) 
have qualified in the Friday evening prelimi- 
nary group for the Bronx Championship Finals 
One more man is still due to qualify from the 
trio j. Sohneebanm. E. Scraly* and N f + Schwartz 
(4-3). In the Monday evening group* the qual- 
ifiers were J + Chassan (k-l), N, Eiger M 
Feldman and A, N, Towsen (all 7-2). 

At a meeting of the board of directors, the 
following motion was passed unanimously 
"Resolved, that we extend our hospitality and 
free membership tor the current year to Euro- 
pean refugees/’ 



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Official Organ of the 
United States of America 
Chess Federation 


rjhe 


CHESS 

REVIEW 


I. A. Horowitz 
Fred Rein feld 
Editors 


Yob VIII, No. 7 Published Monthly October, 1940 

Published bi-monthly June - September ; published 
monthly October -May by The Chess Review, 25 
West 43rd Street, New York, N, Y. Telephone 
Wisconsin 7-3742. Domestic subscriptions: One 
Year $3.00; Two Years $5,50; Five Years $12,50, 
Single copy 30 cents. Foreign subscriptions: $3,50 
per year except U. S. Possessions, Canada, Mexico, 
Central and South America, Single copy 30 cents. 

Copyright 1939 by The Chess Review 

"Reentered as second class matter July 26, 1940, at 
the post office at New York, N. Y., under the Act 
of March 3* 1879. 


World Championship 
Run Around 

By Fred Reinfeld 

Chess players will be delighted to hear that 
Dr, Alekhine’s whereabouts have now been 
ascertained, for the New York Times reports 
that he recently communicated with J. R. Capa- 
blanca regarding the world championship title. 
It almost sounds like the piping times of peace, 
however, to learn that a new act, no more 
entertaining than the previous ones, is being 
added to the already interminable ballet of 
match negotiations. 

On August 4 the Times headlined: 
"CAPABLANCA HERE READY FOR 

MATCH 

Cuban Chess Star Would Play for Title, 
but Lacks Word on Fate of Alekhine/’ 

On September 8, the headlines had changed 

to: 

"ALEKHINE IS SAFE; PROPOSES MATCH 
Chess Champion in Marseilles, Seeks a Pass- 
port to Cuba to Negotiate Terms 
CAPABLANCA IS DOUBTFUL 
Says Only Clubs in Argentine Are Interested 
in Backing Contest for the Title/ 1 

The August 4 item strewed buttercups all 
over the possibility of a match, as for example: 
,r The Cuban master is still hopeful that* when- 
ever Dr, Alekhine is available and amenable 
to a match, the committee of the Argentine 
Chess Federation will continue the negotiations 
for an encounter between these two experts 
which were begun in Buenos Aires immediately 
after the close of the international meeting/ 1 

But the real crux of the matter is expressed 
in a stray sentence from the September 8 ac- 
count: "They were both in Buenos Aires 

for the international meeting, but left there 
without an understanding/' Etc., etc,, etc., 
etc. 


One other aspect of the situation is worth 
noting: according to a Times interview, Capa- 
blanca stated that aside from himself" the 
most suitable candidates for a Championship 
Match w r ere Paul Keres and Mikhail Botvmnik. 
Having read this sort of thing more than once, 
I cannot avoid the suspicion that these two 
players are favored because of their geographi- 
cal unavailability. There is of course not the 
slightest question as to their preeminence and 
ability, but it has become quite the vogue to 
ignore Reshevsky and Fine ostentatiously when- 
ever World Championship possibilities are 
being discussed. 

This snootiness baffles the writer, because 
Reshevsky and Fine have very definitely held 
their own, to say the least, in the three great 
tournaments of recent years {Nottingham, Sem- 
mering and Avro) . Don't these lads even de« 
serve to he n?w? t toned?! What goes on? 

P. S, With European chess blacked out for 
the duration, and v/ith a superb array of such 
masters as Capablanca, Dr. Lasker, Marshall, 
Reshevsky, Fine, Horowitz and Kashdan (to 
mention no others) on hand, we have the mak- 
ings of a magnificent master tourney right in 
our own country. How about it f chess patrons 
and fans?! 


Slaughter! 

Kemeri-Riga 1939 
INDIAN DEFENSE 



M. Feigi 

in 

S, Szabo 


White 


Black 


1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

13 R-Q1 

Kt-Kt2 

a 

P-QB4 

P-KKt3 

14 P-QS 

B-Kt2 

3 

Kt-QB3 

P-Q4 

15 Q-K4 

PxP 

4 

Kt-B3 

B-Kt2 

16 KtxP 

Kt-K3 

5 

Q-Kt3 

PxP 

17 Kt-Kt5 

Q-Q2 

6 

QxBP 

0-0 

IS B-B3 

R-Q1 

7 

P-K4 

P-B3 

19 Q-KR4 

Kt-Bl 

8 

B-K2 

P-Kt3 

20 KtxRP 

Kt-B3 

9 

Q-Q3 

Kt-R4 

21 KtxKt 

RxKt 

ID 

0-0 

Kt-Q2 

22 B-Kt5 

Q-K3 

11 

P-K5 

Kt-Ktl 

23 BxP 

Resigns 

12 

P-KR3 

B-R1 




146 


The Chess Review 


Chess at Dallas 

By George Sturgis 

The 1940 Open. Tournament of the United 
States Chess Federation has just been held at 
Dallas, Texas. The games were played in the 
beautiful Adolphus Hotel which placed at our 
disposal for the Tournament a large room on 
the 21st floor, .high above the city, From the 
windows we enjoyed a magnificent view of the 
city of Dallas and the surrounding country, and 
contrary to the pessimism of many of my 
friends who predicted nothing but suffocating 
heat in Dallas in August, I found the climate 
truly delightful — warm but not humid and with 
fresh breezes which kept the air circulating most 
of the time. 

Twenty. seven players entered the tourna- 
ment. Ten states and Canada were represented. 
Under the able direction of Messrs, Thompson 
and McKee of the local committee every detail 
was handled to the satisfaction of everybody. 
Upon Mr* McKee devolved the duties of tour- 
nament director as Mr, Thompson, Chairman 
of the local committee and one of the strongest 
players in the south, had elected to compete 
in the tournament. 

Three sections were formed of nine players 
in each section, Reuben Fine, famous inter- 
nationalist, was seeded in one section; Herman 
Steiner of Los Angeles in another; and Weaver 
Adams of Dedham in the third. Two games 
were scheduled each day, afternoon and eve- 
ning. Adjourned games were completed on 
the next following morning. 

During the course of the tournament many 
splendid games were played. In the prelimi- 
naries Thompson, Roddy, and Eio each suc- 
ceeded in drawing their games with Fine who 
did not actually lose a game during the tour- 
nament. The first three players from each 
section qualified for the final round in the 
Masters' Division; the second three for the 
Consolation Masters; and the last three for 
the Class A. Those who qualified for the final 
round in the Masters' class were Fine, Steiner, 
Adams, Marc hand, Thompson, Kendall, Oil- 
man, Burdge, and Eio* Weaver Adams, W. 
M. P, Mitchell and I represented New England, 
Mitchell and I both qualified for the Consola- 
tion Masters Final, but both of us finished 
rather down in the final standing in that class. 

The tournament was won by Fine with a 
perfect score of 8-0 with Steiner finishing 
in second place in spite of the fact that he 
dropped three of his first four games! Adams 
and Marchand shared third-fourth place, and 
Thompson, Kendall, Oh man, Eio and Burdge 



WEAVER ADAMS 


followed. The games of Adams were fol- 
lowed with particular interest by many, since 
he is the well-known author of "White to 
Play and Win" and the spectators were curious 
to see if his theories would work against strong 
competition. Curiously enough, in the final 
round of play, Adams won all his games with 
the black pieces and failed to win a single 
game with white, although he succeeded with 
white in drawing against Flo. How do you 
account for that, Weaver? 


7 he P ro v e) ' bud T wo B is hop , 1 / 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 



A. 

Eio 


A. Roddy 



White 


Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-QB4 

22 

Kt-K2 

Q-R5 

2 

Kt-K 83 

K1-QB3 

23 

P-Kt3 

Q-R3 

3 

P-Q4 

PxP 

24 

R-QB1 

Rx R 

4 

KtxP 

Kt-B3 

25 

KtxR 

B-B6 

5 

Kt-QB3 

P-Q3 

26 

R-B1 

B-R6 

6 

B-K2 

P- K Kt3 

27 

R-B2 

B-Kt7 

7 

0-0 

B-Kt2 

28 

KLK2 

Q-K6 

a 

Kt-Kt3 

0-0 

29 

Kt-Ktl 

QxR 

9 

P-B3 

B-K3 

30 

KtxB 

Q-Q5 

10 

Kt-Q5 

R-B1 

31 

Q-K2 

B-R6 

11 

P-QB4 

P-QKt4 

32 

B-B4 

P-K3 

12 

KtxKtch 

BxKt 

33 

KLB4 

K-Kt2 

13 

PxP 

Q-Kt3ch 

34 

K-Kt2 

P-Kt4 

14 

K-R 1 

Kt-KtS 

35 

BxP 

R-B6 

15 

B-Q2 

Kt-B7 

36 

Kt-R5ch 

K- Kt3 

16 

R-Ktl 

Kt-K6 

37 

B-B5ch 

KxKt 

17 

BxKt 

QxB 

38 

P- B4ch 

K-R3 

18 

Kt-BI 

R-B2 

39 

PxPeh 

K- Kt2 

19 

R-K1 

G-Kt3 

40 

Q-R5 R-B7ch 

20 

P-Q Kt3 

KR-B1 

41 

K-R3 

K-B1 

21 

B-Q3 

Q-B7 


Resigns 



October, 1940 


147 


A curious situation, developed in one of the 
games in which one player announced a mate 
in three, forgot to push his clock, his time ran 
out, and his opponent claimed the game on 
time forfeiture! Shortly thereafter the players 
agreed upon a draw. But this agreement was 
subsequently nullified by the tournament dL 
rector because the game was of vital conse^ 
qnence to a third player. The final decision 
of the referee upheld the claim to time for- 
feiture In spite of the announced mate in three. 
Moral: better complete your move in time 
even though you have mate on the move. 

Following the tournament a delightful bam 
quet was held at the Y.M.CA., a truly pleasant 
ending to the first Open Tournament held 
under the new banner of the United States 
Chess Federation, 


A Bitter Battle All The Way, 

BISHOP'S OPENING 
W. W. Adams W. N* Kendall 

White Black 


1 P-K4 

P-K4 

27 KtxBP 

RxR 

2 B-B4 

B-B4 

28 Kt-R5ch 

K-Kt3 

3 Kt-QB3 

Kt-KB3 

29 PxR 

KxKt 

4 P, 03 

P-Q3 

30 P- K R4 

P-KR3 

5 P- B4 

B-KKt5 

31 PxB 

PxP 

6 Kt-B3 

Kt-B3 

32 K-B3 

R-Q2 

7 Kt-QR4 

B-Kt3 

33 K-K3 

R-K2 

8 P-K R3 

BxKt 

34 P-Q4 

PxPch 

9 QxB 

Kt-QR4 

35 KxP 

K- Kt5 

10 PxP 

PxP 

36 R-K5 

RxR 

11 B-Kt5 

Q-Q3 

37 KxR 

KxP 

12 0-0-0 

Q-B3 

38 K.B5 

P-K15 

13 KR-B1 

KtxB 

39 P-K5 

K-&6 

14 PxKt 

0-0 

40 P-K6 

P-Kt6 

15 Kt-B3 

B-Q5 

41 P-K7 

P-Kt7 

16 BxKt 

QxB 

42 P-K8(Q) P.Kt8(Q) 

17 QxQ 

PxQ 

43 Q-K4ch 

K-B7 

18 Kt-Q5 

P-B3 

44 Q-Q4ch 

K-Kt7 

19 KtxPch 

K-Kt2 

45 QxQch 

KxQ 

20 R.Q3 

QR-Q1 

46 K-K5 

K-B7 

21 P-B5 

BxP 

47 K-06 

K-K7 

22 Kt-Q7 

B-K6ch 

48 K-B7 

K-Q7 

23 K-Q1 

KR-K1 

49 KxP 

K-B7 

24 K-K2 

B-Kt4 

50 KxBP 

KxP 

25 R*B5 

P-B3 

51 P-R4 

K-B6 

26 P-KKt3 

R-K2 

Drawn 


QUEEN’S GAMBIT DECLINED 


A, 

EIo 

H. Burdge 

White 

Black 


1 P-Q4 

P-Q4 

13 Kt-B5 

BxKt 

2 P-QB4 

P-K3 

14 BxB 

P-KKt3 

3 Kt-QB3 

Kt-KB3 

15 B-Q3 

Kt-K3 

4 B-Kt5 

QKt-Q2 

16 R-R3 

P-B4 

5 P*K3 

P-B3 

17 PxP 

P-Q5 

6 PxP 

K PxP 

1& BxKt 

BxB 

7 B-Q3 

B-K2 

19 Kt-K4 

B-Kt2 

8 G-B2 

o-o 

20 P-R5 

P-B4 

9 0 0-0 

R-K1 

21 Kt-Q6 

R-K2 

10 KKt-K2 

Kt-Bl 

22 PxKtP 

RPxP 

11 Kt-Kt$ 

B-K3 

23 B-B4 

Resigns 

12 P-KR4 

P-QR3 




SECTION I 

Player W L 

W. W H Adams, Dedhams, Mass 
E, W. Marchand, Clayton, Mo, . 

W. N. Kendall, San Antonio . . 

Daniel Mayers, Tucson, Ariz. , . 

George Sturgis, Boston, Mass, , 

Walter F, Brown, Houston . , , „ 

C B. Cook, Fort Worth 

Albert Meyer, Dallas ......... 

Robert Potter, Edinburg, Texas , 

SECTION II 

Reuben Pine, New York ...... 

J. C. Thompson, Dallas 

Arpad E. EIo, Milwaukee ..... 

Albert Roddy, Jr., Tulsa ...... 

Joseph Rauch, Montreal 

Edgar Hartsfield, Dallas 
Kirk D. Holland, Fort Worth . 

R. S. Underwood, Lubbock .... 

R. D. Allentharp, Austin 

SECTION III 

Herman Steiner, Los Angeles . 7 -1 

Harold Burdge, Ventnor City, N, J. . .6 -2 

Howard E. Ohman, Omaha, Neb. . . . 

J. W, Stapp, Dallas . . . 5^-2l/ 2 

C W. HrissikopouJos, Corpus Christi.4 -4 

Bela Rosza, Waco 3 -5 

W. M. P, Mitchell, Brookline, Mass.. 

Edwin L. Sanger, Dallas 1 y 2 -6V 2 

A. D. McNabb, Dallas .1 *7 


6l/ r ii/ 2 
6 .2 
5 *3 

4y 2 -3y 2 
4^-3 1/ 2 

iy 2 -6y 2 
0 -8 


7 4 

6 * 4 - 11/2 

5 -3 

4y 2 -3y 2 

2y 2 - 5 y 2 

i Vi^Vi 
1 -7 


CONSOLATION TOURNAMENT 


Player 

W L 

J. Rauch, Montreal 

.5 -2 

Edgar Hartsfield, Dallas 

.4y 2 -2y 2 

Chas. Hrissikopoulos, Corpus Christ! . 

. 4 J2 

Daniel Mayers, Tucson 

A -3 

Albert Roddy, Jr., Tulsa 

A -3 

Bela Ro 2 sa, Waco 

.3 A 

George Sturgis, Boston 

.3 A 

W. M, P. Mitchell, Brookline, Mass.. 

p 

■ V2-6V2 

CLASS A TOURNAMENT 


Player 

W L 

A. D. McNabb, Dallas 

.7 ^0 

Kirk D. Holland, Fort Worth ...... 

,6 -1 

R. S. Underwood, Lubbock 

A -3 

R. B. Potter, Edinburg 

A -3 

Edwin Sanger, Dallas 

.3 A 

C. B. Cook, Fort Worth 

.2 -5 

R, iD. Allentharp, Austin ..... s t 

.1 -6 

Albert Meyer, Dallas 

.0 .7 


148 


The Chess Review 


A. C. F. TOURNAMENT— FINALS 

Fine 

Steiner j 

Adams 

£ 

Sd 

s 

ns 

ins 

c 

<v 

Thompson 

o 

s 

G 

£ 

JZ 

O 

u 

taO 

T7 

i— 1 

0 

CQ 

Won 

Lost 

1. 

Reuben Fine, New York . * 


L 1 i 1 | 1 j 1 1 1 

1 8 -0 

2* 

Herman Steiner, Los Angeles 

0 

— 0 L j 0 1 j 1 j l 1 |j 5 -3 

3,-4,|W, W. Adams, Dedham, Mass . . . . . 

0 

1 

0 j 1 

1 Wz\ 1 1 o|| 4i/ 2 -3i/ 2 

3.-4. |E. W. Marchand, Clayton, Mo 

0 

0 

< - i mm\ i i j / 2 1 Wi-Wi 

5.-6.JW. N. Kendall, San Antonio 

0 

1 

> 

o 

o 

1 W 2 W 2 W 31 / 2 - 41/2 

5,^6. ]J, G Thompson, Dallas 

0 

0 0 

| | ! * J - 1 

31 / 2 - 41 /. 

7.-8. A. E. Bio, Milwaukee 

0 

o l /2 Vz 0 

0 

W 2 

1 

2 / 2-5 y 2 

7,-8. |H, E. Ohman, Omaha 

0 0 | 0 0 

Vi 

y 2 

/> 

- — — 

1 

2 / 2 - 5 % 

Burdge, Ventnor City, N. J 

0 

0 

1 l/ 2 

1/ 2 |0 

0 

VD 

1 1 

1 

rN 

I 

O 


Roddy covered himself with glory with the 
following sensational draw against Fine: 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 

A* Roddy R. Fine 

White Black 


26 . . , . 

27 K-B3 

28 QxRch 

29 QxB 

30 B-B4 


QxPch 
RxKt 
R-B2 
K Kt2 
R-B3 


Drawn. A very creditable game by ’White, 
who was not afraid to '"mix it" with his for- 
midable opponent 


Sixty moves are not enough! 

QUEEN'C GAMBIT DECLINED 


H, Steiner 

White 


B, Rosza 
Black 


1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K3 

3 

Kt-KB3 

P-Q4 

4 

Kt-B3 

B-Kt5 

5 Q-Kt3 

P-B4 

6 

B-Kt5 

Kt-B3 

7 

QPxP 

0-0 

a 

P-K3 

P-KR3 

9 

B-R4 

P-KKt4 

10 

B-Kt3 

Kt-K5 

11 

B-K2 

Q-B3 

12 QR-B1 

P-KR4 


13 

P-KR4 

P-Kt5 

14 

Kt-Q4 

QKtxKt 

15 

QxB 

KtxQB 

16 

PxKKt 

Kt-B4 

17 

PxP 

KtxKtP 

18 

R-Ktl 

PxP 

19 

KtxP 

QxRP 

20 

Q-KB4 

B-K3 

21 

Kt-K7oh 

K-R2 

22 

B-Q3ch 

P-B4 

23 

K-Q2 

QR-K1 


1 

P-Q4 

P-Q4 

2 

Kt-KB3 

P-K3 

3 

P-B4 

Kt-KB3 

4 

KtB3 

P-B3 

5 

B-Kt5 

B-K2 

6 

P-K3 

P-KR3 

7 

B-R4 

0-0 

8 

Q-B2 

QKt-Q2 

9 

P-QR3 

P-QKt3 

10 

R-Q1 

B-Kt2 

11 

B-Q3 

R-B1 

12 

0-0 

P-B4 

13 

BPxP 

KtxP 

14 

BxB 

QxB 

15 

KtxKt 

BxKt 

16 

Q-K2 

P-B5 

17 

B-Ktl 

P-B6 

18 

KR-K1 

BxKt 

19 

PxB 

PxP 

20 

QxP 

P-B4 

21 

K-R1 

Kt-B3 

22 

R-Ktl 

R-QB2 

23 

R-Kt2 

Q-Q3 

24 

Q’R-Ktl 

KR-B2 

25 

R-Kt6 

K-B1 

26 

B-R2 

0-03 

27 

Q-Kt4ch 

KR-K2 

28 

P-K4 

PxP 

29 

P.Q5 

PxQP 

30 

PxP 

P-QR4 

31 

PxP 

PxQ 


32 

PxQ 

RxP 

33 

PxP 

KR-QB2 

34 

P-B3 

Kt-R4 

35 

RxR 

RxR 

36 

B-Q5 

R-Q3 

37 

B-K4 

R-Q7 

38 

R-QB1 

K-K2 

39 

P-Kt5 

Kt-B5 

40 

P-R4 

Kt-K3 

41 

R-R1 

Kt-B4 

42 

R-R7ch 

R-Q2 

43 

RxRch 

KxR 

44 

B-B6c h 

K-Q3 

45 

K-Kt2 

Kt-K3 

46 

K-Kt3 

Kt-Q5 

47 

B-K8 

K-K2 

43 

B-Kt6 

KtxKtP 

49 

K-B4 

Kt-Q3 

50 

K K5 

P-Kt4 

51 

K-Q5 

P-Kt5 

52 

B-B2 

Kt-B2 

53 

P-B4 

Kt-Ql 

54 

K-K5 

Kt-B3ch 

55 

K-Q5 

Kt-R4 

56 

K-B5 

P-Kt6 

57 

B-K4 

P-Kt7 

58 

K-Kt4 

Kt-B3eh 

59 

K-B3 

K-Q3 

60 

KxP 

Drawn 


Black can win with 
60 i i & Kt-Q5 etc. 


Fine 



Roddy 


How is White to salvage the errant Knight? 
He hits on the combination of a lifetime: 

24 R-KR1M1 KtxR 

25 RxKt QxR 

26 Q-Kt5 . . . . 

The point White's mating threat forces 
the draw. 



October, l 9 4 o 


14S> 


Things I Never Knew 

By Fred Reinfeld 

We chess players are often saddened by the 
scant attention given to chess; we are always 
hoping that the game we love so much will 
be given favorable publicity of the kind that 
appeared in a recent chess article in Life (see 
The Chess Review, April issue, P, 49), The 
few Items on chess that do appear, however, 
are usually characterized by such corny humor 
and such preposterous attempts at ridicule that 
one must desperately conclude that no publi- 
city at all is preferable. 

These melancholy thoughts were induced by 
reading an article on the recent American 
Championship Tournament in The New Yorker 
of June 15. The author is one Robert Lewis 
Taylor, whom The New Yorker describes (with 
unnecessarily brutal frankness) as A Reporter 
at Large. Mr. Taylor's style is compounded 
of breathless inanities smothered in pixillated 
whimsy. What matter-of-fact detail he pre- 
sents is vitiated by a slick and phony innocence 
which forever seems to be saying, ‘'Terribly 
quaint, my deah!" One's irritation is increased 
by the numerous errors which are liberally 
strewn over every page. Presumably it is a 
sign of sophistication to hash up even the 
simplest set of facts, and such elementary ac- 
curacy as might he found in the Penmanship 
lesson of a 1A class, is beyond the powers 
of A Reporter at Large. 

Mr. Robert Lewis Taylor begins with an 
inaccurate description of the merging of the 
two former federations. He then tells us of 
Mr. Stephens’ fondness for saying "Gadzooks," 
— not important, of course, but also not true. 
But perhaps Mr, Robert Lewis Taylor can hear 
what ordinary mortals miss; perhaps he can 
even hear grass grow. 

He then learns from Mr. Stephens that a 
Grand Master "is a master who has either won, 
placed, or showed in a major tournament or 
been named a Grand Master by Czar Nicolas 
II of Russia. The Czar, it seems, was a 
rather arbitrary chess fan who enjoyed watch- 
ing matches, and when he saw a player he 
liked the looks of, he just slapped the title 
on him/" 

It Is difficult to see why Mr. Robert Lewis 
Taylor didn’t supplement this double talk 
(which obviously doesn't stem from Mr. Ste- 
phens) with the story of The Three Bears. 
As everyone knows, there was a Papa Bear, 
a Mama Bear, and a Baby Bear, and none 
of them, to my knowledge, ever established 
a criterion for defining the term Grand Master. 
Perhaps Mr. Robert Lewis Taylor will even 


tell us how Grand Masters were determined 
before the birth and after the death of Czar 
Nicholas II! 

According to Mr. Taylor, "most of the 
players looked to be in their thirties— thin, 
nervous, bespectacled men with tense faces 
and quick hands." The concoction of this 
cliche didn't require a trip to the Astor; it 
could have been written in the office of The 
New Yorker without the bother of actually 
observing chess masters. "When play started, 
the Masters bent forward, placed their heads 
in their hands, and stared gloomily at the 
boards in front of them." Later, Mr. Taylor 
found them "muttering, and looking at the 
ceiling beseechingly/" More cliches, 

Now he begins seeing things again: Resh- 
evsky "drumming irritably on his knee with 
a captured Pawn." An imaginative touch 
worthy of Shakespeare! Another vision: "Resti* 
evsky picked up his Rook, blew on it, and 
shoved it across the board." Shame on you, 
Mr. Taylor! Don’t you know that blowing on 
pieces is forbidden by the International Chess 
Code?! See Rule 297, Paragraph III a 6, And 
"just before five o’clock the word got around 
that Reshevsky had lost the tempo'/' 

Mr. Taylor's description of the Fine-Resh- 
evsky game, and his analysis of the imaginary 
motivations which he attributes to their pur- 
ported actions, form a delightful chapter in 
the history of make-believe. Let me (if I were 
Mr. Robert Lewis Taylor, I'd refer to myself 
only as "we” and "us"— known as the pixil- 
lated ''we") give you the most delicious sample: 
"Noticing an abnormal fixity in the stare of 
several persons who were leaning over the 
rope, I hunted up the girl who had told me 
about the women players and asked her if it 
meant anything. Oh, yes,' she said, 'Some 
of the more rabid rooters look at their favorite's 
opponent and try to beat him by telepathy. 
They concentrate on a bad move and try to 
think him into making it’," Think of the 
brain that could hatch an idea like that! It 
reminds me of the man who suggested putting 
cats on torpedoes in order to steer them ac- 
curately! 

Gadzooks! — — — — 

Marshall C. C. Intra-Club Match 1 940 
ALEKHINE’S DEFENSE 
T, Angel Dr. A. Buschke 

White Black 


1 P-K4 

Kt*KB3 

9 B-QB4 

BxKt 

2 P-K5 

Kt-Q4 

10 QxB 

KI-KB3 

3 Kt-KB3 

P-Q3 

11 Kt-B3 

Kt-B3 

4 P-Q4 

B Kt5 

12 Kt-Q5 

Q-Q1 

5 B-K2 

P-GB4 

13 QxKt! 

PxQ 

6 0-0 

Q-Kt3? 

14 KlxPch 

K-B1 

7 KPxP 

KPxP 

15 B-R6 mate 


a R-K 1 

B-K2 

■ 



More Games From The Championship 


The driving force of Black's logically built L 
up phalanx on the King-side ultimately de- 
cides the issue * 


DUTCH DEFENSE (in effect) 


(Notes by S. 

D, Polland 
White 

1 P-Q4 

2 P-QB4 

3 Kt-KB3 

4 B~Q2 

5 P-QR3 


, Bernstein) 

S, N. Bernstein 
Black 

K1-KB3 

P-K3 

B-Kt5ch 

Q-K2 


Losing a tempo, since Black would eventu- 
ally exchange anyway, 5 Kt-R3, BxKt etc. 
gives Black a .favorable form of the Dutch De- 
fense. On the other hand, the best square for 
his QKt is QB3, hence White rejects the line 
5 F-KKt3, BxBch ! 6 QxB, Kt-K5 ; 7 Q-B2, Q- 
KtSchl leaving White with an unpromising posi- 
tion (8 QKt-Q2, KtxKt; 9 KtxKt, Kt-B3 etc.). 

5 , , . ♦ BxBch 9 B-Kt2 P-Q3 

6 QxB Kt-K5 10 Kt-B3 KtxKt 

7 Q-B2 P-KB4 11 QxKt Kt-Q2 

8 P-KKt3 0-0 

11 . . . Kt-B3 allows 12 P-Q5, after which 12 
. . . PxP gives White pressure on the QB file, 
while 12 . * * Kt-Ql; 13 PxP gives White's 
B a strong diagonal. 


12 

0-0 

P-K 4 

13 

PxP 

PxP 

14 

QR-Q1 

R-K1 

15 

P-Q Kt4 

KLB3 

16 

KLK1 

R-Ktl 


An important move, since an attempt of 
White's Kt to reach QB6 will simply be met 
by * * . F-QKt3, 

17 Kt-Q3 P-K5 

18 Kt-B4 P-B3 

. , 19 P-B5 P-K Kt4 [ 


Quite logical* Black’s whole setup is based 
on the chances for a K side attack, 

20 R-Q6 K-B2 

Not 20 , * * R-Bl; 21 Q.-B4ch, K-Rl; 22 Kb 
K6, R-Ktl ; 23 KR-Q1 etc* 

21 Q-B4ch K-Kt2 

22 Kt-R3 

There is nothing in 22 RxKt, KxR etc. 

22 , P-KR3 

23 KR-Q1 B-K3 

24 Q-Q4 B-Kt6 S 

A valuable “intermezzo/' White is now re- 
luctant to play 25 R-Q2, not only because of a 
possible , . , P-K 6 later on, but also because 
by leaving the first rank unguarded, he will 
be forced to exchange Qs after , , . Q-K4 (ii: 
Black so desires!), 

25 R-QB1 B^Q4 

26 Q-K3 Q-K4 

Realizing that White is only bluffing in his 
threat to sacrifice a piece. 

27 R-Q1 .... 

Note the time gained by 24 , . . B-Kt6, 

27 . * * * R-K2 

28 P-B4 .... 


Absolutely forced, to meet the threat 28 . . , 
Kt-Kl, since White cannot afford 28 R-Q-l (so 
as to answer 28 . . . Kt-Kl with 29 P-B4), Kt- 
KtS! 29 Q-E3 (29 Q-Q2, P-K6; 30 PxP, RxB; 31 
KxB, KtxPeh etc,), P-R5 ! with a murderous 
attack. 


23 * ■ ■ * 

29 QxQ 

30 RxP 

31 R-Q3 


PxP e,p. 
RxQ 
B-Kt6 
B-B5 


32 R-B3 

33 Kt-B2 

34 B~Kt2 

35 P-R3 


B-Kt4 

P-Kt5 

RxP 

P-KR4I 


35 . , . QR-K1 was good enough (threat: 30 
« . . R-K8ch followed by 37 . . . R(l)-K7, like- 
wise doubling Rs on the 7th rank; but Black 
was intrigued by the idea of somehow opening 
up the KR file for a mating attack* 

36 P-Q R4 BxP 

37 R.R3 B*Kt4 

38 RxP .... 


Bernstein 



Potland 


38 ... . P-R5! 

The winning move* If 39 BxP, BxB; 40 RxB, 
PxKtP; 11 Kt-Rl, PxP! 42 KtxP, R-Kt7ch; 43 
K-Rl, RxKt; 44 R-ETeh, K-Kt3; 45 QRxP, RxR; 
46 RxR, Kt-KtS and 47 . . * P-R7. 

Or 39 Kt-Rl, P-B5! etc. Finally if 39 Kt-Q3, 
PxKtP; 40 R-Rl, BxKt; 41 RxB, P-B5 etc, 

39 RPxP RPxP 42 B-B1 P-B5 

40 Kt-Q3 BxKt 43 R-KB3 Kt-Q4 

41 RxB R-K8ch 44 R-R2 QR-K1 

White resigns. An. odd ; position; there is 
no defense to the threat (among others) of 
15 . , . R(l) -K6 3 

If 45 K-K12, K-B3 (or 15 . . . Kt-KSch; 46 
K-Ktl, P-Kt7) and White is paralyzed: 43 
E-Q3, KbK6ch; 47 K-R3, R R1 mate, 


$h din sunt comments: :: During the recent 
Championship Tournament, the greatest buga- 
boo. as far as 1 was concerned , was the time- 
clock. Witness the effects of the time element 
in my games with Tine and Re s he v sky!! In the 
following game / solved that perplexing prob- 


150 



October, 1940 


151 


lem by the truly beautiful idea of repetition of 
moves f thus paining vital seconds /' 

INDIAN DEFENSE 

(Notes by G. Shainswit) 


G. Shainswit 
White 

1 P.QB4 Kt-K B3 

2 KLKB3 P-K Kt3 

3 P-Q4 B-Kt2 

4 P-K Kt3 P-B3 


P. Woliston 

Black 

5 B-Kt2 0-0 

6 0-0 P-Q4 

7 Q-Kt3 QKt-Q2 

8 PxP . . 


This exchange gives White a slight positional 
edge. 


PxP 

Q-R4 


13 

14 

15 

see 


Q-Kt3 

Q-R3 


Q-Kt4 
Q-R4 
Q-Kt3 . . , , 

the introductory 


is important 


not to 
or the 


8 . * . . 

9 Kt-B3 

Not a good idea. 

10 B-Q2 R-Q1 

11 KtQKtB Q-Kt3 

12 Q-R4 Q-R3 

Repetition the First; 
comment. Of course it 
repeat, the same position three times, 
wary opponent would claim the draw. 

15 ... . Q-Kt3 

16 B-B4 R-B1 

17 Kt-B7 QxQ 

18 PxQ R-Ktl 

19 Kt-Kt5 1 

Repetition the Second(i) and "obviously” 
superior to the immediate RxP. 

19 , , , . R-R1 22 KR-R1 R-Kt2 

20 Kt-B7 R-Ktl 23 Kt-K5! RxR 

21 RxP P-Kt3 24 RxR P-K3 

25 Kt B6! .... 

White’s pieces infiltrate on all weak points. 

25 ... . K-R1 

To save the exchange. 


26 B-Q6 R-KKtl 

Forced, 

27 Kt-K7 R-B1 

Now comes Repetition the Third! 


28 Kt-B6 R-Ktl 

29 Kt-K7 R-B1 

30 P-K 3 P-R3 

31 P-B3 KtR4 

Removing the means 

35 ... . 

36 R-R8 


32 P-K Kt4 KKt-B3 

33 B-B1 Kt-R2 

34 B-Kt5 KKt-B3 

35 B.B6 

of escape for Black’s B f 

K-R2 


Under the time limit — and by virtue of the 
new technique with four minutes to spare! ! 
Black resigns. 

Final Position: 


Woliston 



Shainswit 


White's King is smoked out of his lair . 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 


W, Adams 

D. Polla 

nd 

White 


Black 


1 P-K4 

P-QB4 

20 P-Kt5 

B-R8 

2 Kt-KB3 

P-Q3 

21 K-Ktl 

PxKt 

3 P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

22 KxB 

PxP 

4 Kt-B3 

PxP 

23 R-QKtl 

PxP 

5 KtxP 

P-KKt3 

24 RxP 

Q-R2ch 

6 B-K2 

B-Kt2 

25 K-Kt2 

Kt-K4 

7 B-K3 

Kt-B3 

26 Q-Kt4 

Kt-B5ch 

8 Q-Q2 Kt-KKt5 

27 K-B1 

K-B2 

9 BxKt 

BxB 

28 Q-B3 

Kt-K4 

10 P*B3 

B-K3 

29 Q-K3 

Q-RSch 

11 KtxB 

PxKt 

30 R-Ktl 

RxPch 

12 B.R6 

B-B3 

31 KxR 

R-BIch 

13 Kt-K2 

R-QB1 

32 K-Q2 

Q-R7ch 

14 0-0-0 

Kt K4 

33 K-K1 

QxRch 

15 P-QKt3 

P-QKt4 

34 K=B2 

R-B7ch 

16 Kt-Q4 

Q-Q2 

35 K^Kt3 

QxR 

17 P-K Kt4 

Kt-B3 

36 Q-B4ch 

K-K1 

18 KtxKtP 

Q-Kt2 

Resigns 


1 9 P-QR4 

P-R3 




A gruelling war of nerves ■ which had a vital 
bearing on the final distribution of prizes « 

RUY LOPEZ 

(Notes by Fred Reinfeld) 

L Kashdan S. Reshevsky 

White Black 


1 P-K4 

P-K4 

5 0-0 

B-K2 

2 KLKB3 

Kt-QB3 

6 Q-K2 

P.QKt4 

3 B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

7 B-Kt3 

P-Q3 

4 B-R4 

Kt-B3 

8 P-QR4 

B-Kt5 

As In his game vs. 

Pinkus, (New York 1939 

— but not 

quite the 

same position), 

this de* 

velopment 

evsky. 

later leads 

to difficulties 

for Resh- 

9 P-B3 

0^0 

19 Kt-B5 

Kt-Kt2 

10 P-R3 

B,R4?I 

20 RxR 

RxR 

11 P-Q3 

Kt-R4 

21 KtxBch 

QxKt 

12 B-B2 

P-B4 

22 KtrR4 

Kt-B4 

13 PxP 

PxP 

23 Kt-B5 

BxKt 

14 P-KKt4 

B-Kt3 

24 KPxB 

P-K5 

15 QK1-Q2 

Q-B2 

25 R-Q1 

R-K1 

16 K1-R4 

P-Q4 

26 R-Q4 

P-R3 

17 QKt-B3 

PxP 

27 B-K3 

Kt-Q6 

18 PxP 

P-B5 

28 BxKt 

BPxB 


Kashdan has characteristically played for 
the Bs, but the Kt was too strong. He is 
replaced by a venomous passed P which must 
always be watched. White now wins the weak 
QKtP r but Reshevsky resourcefully creates 
counter play by removing White’s B, thus mak- 
ing the QP more potent than ever. 


£? w -dr r 

Kt'-CTi 1 

$4 F-S€ 

PxP 

30 K-Kt2 

Kt-Kt3 

35 QxP 

R-Q1 

31 Q-Kt3 

Kt-B5 

36 Q-R5 

RxR 

32 QxP 

KtxBch 

37 BPxR 

Q-Kt2 

33 PxKt 

P-R4 

38 Q-Q8ch 

K-Kt2 

39 

P-Kt5 

P-B4! 



The play now becomes very delicate and 
tricky. If in reply 40 Q-B6ch, K-Ktl ; 41 QxP? 
P-Q7 ; 42 Q-Bl, QxP and wins. 


40 K-B2 QxPeh 

41 K-Kt3 Q-Kt2 

42 K-B2 K-R2 

Black’s difficulty is that a perpetual check 
is unavoidable ; but this seemingly barren po- 
sition still has possibilities. 




L 52 


The Chess Review 


43 P-R4! P-B5I 46 Q-B6 K-Ktl 

44 PxP P-Q7 47 Q-Q8ch K-R2 

45 K-K2 P-K6 48 Q-B6 Q-B2! 

The crisis: Black seems to be able to con- 
tinue guarding against a perpetual check with 
* , , Q-B5ch* which will also produce a new 
Queen, How is White to save himself? 

Reshevsky 


Simonson 



K ash dan 


49 P^Kt6chi 

50 P-R5 


PxP 


Another drawing method as 50 P-QG1 Q- 
B5ch; 51 KxP, P“Q8(Q>; 52 Q-K7ch and the 
perpetual check is unavoidable, neither Black 
Q being of any use!! Or if 5G . * , Q-B5ch; 

51 KxP, QxP; 52 Q-K7 ch and draws, for if 

52 . , 


Q-B5ch 

P-Q8(Q) 

K-R3 

K-Kt2 


K-R3; 53 Q’KtSCh etc. 

50 ... . 

51 KxP 

52 Q-K7ch 

53 Q-Kt5ch 

54 QxPch?? 

A fatal blunder brought on by fatigue and 
time pressure. The drawing line was 54 Q- 
K7ch, Q-B2; 55 P-R6ch, K-Ktl ; 55 F-R7ch! etc. 

54 ... . K-B1 

55 Q-Q6ch K-K 1 

White resigns, A heartbreaking finish for 
him, but the game is a good example of Resh- 
evsky's superb fighting qualities. Those extra 
half “points win tournaments! 


One of the best games of the tournament . 
Black wins a Pawn by a neat combination, and 
■makes his material advantage tell by means of 
forceful and exact endgame play. 

BISHOP'S OPENING 


A. Kupchik 

White 


A. C. Simonson 

Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

9 Kt-B3 

P-QR3 

2 

B-B4 

Kt-KB3 

10 Kt-KKt5 

B-QB4 

3 

P-Q3 

P-B3 

11 KtxB 

PxKt 

4 

Kt-KB3 

P-Q4 

12 Q-K2 

0-0 

5 

PxP 

PxP 

13 Kt-QI 

Kt-Q5 1 

6 

B-Kt3 

Kt-B3 

14 QxP 

QxQ 

7 

0-0 

B-KS 

15 RxQ 

Kt-Kt5 

a 

R-K1 

Q-B2 

16 R-K1 

W ^ -f ■ 



Kupchik 


16 ... . 

RxP! 

32 P-KKt3 

P-K Kt4 

17 KtxR 

KtxB 

33 R-R8 

Kt-B3 

18 RPxKt 

BxKtch 

34 P-QKt4 

P-K5 

19 K-B1 

BxR 

35 B-B2 

P-K6 

20 KxB 

KtxP 

36 B-K1 

R-R2 

21 R-R4 

R-KB1 

37 R-Q8 

Kt-Q2 

22 K-K2 

P-KR4 

38 K-B3 

P-R5 

23 B^K3 

Kt-Kt5 

39 PxP 

PxP 

24 B-Ktl 

P-K4 

40 K-Kt2 

P- R 6c h 

25 R,R5 

R-Q1 

41 K-R2 

K-B5 

26 R-B5 

R-Q2 

42 P-B5 

K-B6 

27 P~Kt4 

K-B2 

43 P-Kt5 

Kt-K4 

28 P-Kt5 

PxP 

44 R-B8ch 

K-K7 

29 RxKtP 

K-K3 

45 B-Kt3 

Kt-B6ch 

30 P-B4 

P-Q5 

46 K-R 1 

R-Kt2 

31 R-R5 

K-B4 

Resigns 



INDIAN 

DEFENSE 


F. Reinfeld 

S. Reshevsky 

White 


Black 


1 P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

20 BxP 

KtxP 

2 P-QB4 

P-KKt3 

21 BxKtP! 

Q-K2 

3 Kt-QB3 

P-Q4 

22 B-K4 

R-Q7 

4 Kt-B3 

B-Kt2 

23 R-B2 

KR-Q1 

5 B-B4 

P-B$ 

24 KR-QB1 

KtxB 

6 P-K3 

0-0 

25 QxKt 

Q-B3 

7 B-Q3 

PxP 

26 Q-B3 

QxQ 

8 BxBP 

QKLQ2 

27 PxQ 

RxR 

9 0-0 

Kt-Kt3 

28 RxR 

R-Q6 

10 B-QKt3 

K Kt-Q4 

29 K-K12 

R-R6 

11 B-K5 

KtxKt 

30 P-R4 

R-R5 

12 PxKt 

B Kt5 

31 K-Kt3 

R-R3 

13 BxB 

KxB 

32 P-B4 

PxPch 

14 P-KR3 

BxKt 

33 KxP 

R- R 5c h 

15 QxB 

Q-B2 

34 P-K4 

R-R4 

16 P-B4 

Kt Q2 

35 P-B3 

K-B3 

17 P-B5 

QR-Q1 

36 R B6ch 

K-Kt2 

18 QR-B1 

P-K4 

37 R-B2 

K-B3 

19 P-Q5?! 

PxP 

Drawn 



PHILADELPHIA AMATEUR CHESS 
TOURNAMENT 

By a half-point advantage, Milton S. Logan 
nosed out Don W Usher for the championship 
of the seventh annual Philadelphia Amateur 
Chess Tournament. Third place was won by 
Dale Schrader, who held a score of three wins 
and two losses. , 

T ■ ^ 1 

Games were played at the International In- 
statute, and the tournament was directed by 
Irving Goldstein. 



The Case of the King’s Shadow 

By L, R, Chauvbnet 



I knew I was going to do something dumb 
that night, and as I stared moodily at the White 
QRP and his surplus Knight, I realised I had 
more than lived up to expectations. Well, it 
was getting too late to go to a movie and I 
hadn't anything better to do that evening, so 
I played R-B7. If onlyK-M5 should become 
possible, 1 might — but now he answers with 
R-K5, ch. Oh, oh. If 1 retreat, the QRP 
wins easily, so I might as well play K-N5 
anyway. I do. He continues with R-.Nxh, 
and there goes a rook, And yet — hmm? I 
confound the expert kibitzers by continuing 
K-R6, rather than resign, N-K5 dis. ch., he 
replies triumphantly, leaning back in his chair 
to enjoy a well-earned win. I gloomily cap- 
ture the pawn. With no hesitation he slaughters 
my trusty rook, and now surely 1 am sunk. Rut 
I quickly play P-R3, and he does not refuse 
to collect my KNP J $ scalp. Hah! I think, 
this looks better, and hastily I move P-R4. 
Now if only he concentrates on thinking about 
his en prise Knight, and does not notice that 
— -AH! He plays N-K53 And now as .1 re- 
spond with R-B5ch, an expression of chagrin 
drives the triumph from his face. He is sold! 
He is swindled! His king has acquired a loyal 
shadow, which will dog his footsteps wher- 
ever he goes, and there is no escape. The 
game's a model draw, for after the most plaus- 
ible attempt, 1 K-Q5, R-Q5ch; 2 K-B6, R-E5 
ch; 3 K-Q7 ? R-R2ch; 4 K-K6, R-K2ch; 5 K-B5, 
R-B2ch; 6 R-B6, Black continues merely RxReh! 
and White cannot avoid a draw, since after 
K-K4, R-R5cbJ either d raws immediately or 
wins the last White pawn, and, of course, 
thanks to the White Knight, KxR. at once 
draws! Ah, chess is a wonderful game — and 
so I go home happy! 


DOES THE CAP FIT?! 

d watched a game of chess in a Belfast Club 
the other night, and was interested in, and 
somewhat amused by, the behaviour of the 
players. Their opening moves were accom- 
panied by bantering remarks, but soon, as the 
issue was joined, their faces became set and 
grim, and stolid silence w J as maintained to the 
end. One player initiated a sharp attack which 
promised well. The reaction of his opponent 
to this, as he made the answering moves which 
he hoped would ward off looming disaster, was 
to shuffle about in his chair as if in acute dis- 
comfort. His hands made strange gestures. 
Well-groomed hair became rather disheveled. 
A pipe from a pocket was hastily returned 
there after a brief but dazed inspection. In- 
stead a handkerchief was brought forth to mop 
a fevered brow. Legs were crossed and un- 
crossed, and occasionally a tentative finger was 
nervously thrust between collar and throat as 
though strangulation was imminent. Mean- 
while, the attacking player's behaviour took the 
milder form of gently patting the back of his 
head with the palm of one hand and tapping 
the table with the fingertips of the other. When 
his attack seemed assured of success he sat back 
in his chair, looking like a crusader in a just 
cause. His opponent, faced with mate on the 
move, looked at the board in utter dejection. 
He had apparently reached the nadir of despair, 
and it would almost have been fitting if a black 
cap or a coffin had made a magical appearance. 
At: fast he reluctantly resigned, then remarked 
that he thought he should have won! The 
winner, with feigned magnanimity, and with 
a trace of pity in his voice, said that he him- 
self had had all the luck!" 

— f( Roamer } In the Belfast Newsletter, 


WAR ENDS A CHESS MATCH 

A. J. Souweine sends us a clipping from "The 
New York Times” with the above heading, 
It tells of the untimely conclusion of the great- 
est correspondence match that has ever been 
held: “The European war has put an end to 
the American-Brittefi chess match by mail. S. 
B. Schinneer of Williams ville, Ilk, -one of the 
American team members, said today that the 
match, which was begun ■ two years ago with 
players reporting their moves by mail had 
been forfeited by the British because of the 
war. The match was to have been completed 
in 1942. Arthur Lind of Cheyenne was Amer- 
ican team captain,” . 


154 


T h )■ Chess Revie w 


Harold M. Phillips 

By LA. Horowitz 

It’s a long time between tournaments, 38 
years in fact, in the case of Harold M. Phillips, 
well known New York attorney and President 
of the Manhattan Chess Club of which he 
became a member in 1899 and continued as 
such without interruption to the present day. 
In 1902 he played for, and won, the Champion- 
ship of the club against a sterling field in- 
cluding such stars as Eugene Delmar, Major 
Hanham, J. Halpern, Gustave Koehler, D, G. 
Baird, 1. W. Baird, and Louis Schmidt. 

Business and social duties allowed him little 
time for chess play in the intervening years. 
He did take part, however, in the Metropolitan 
Chess League matches, and in the annual series 
of dub matches between the Manhattan Chess 
Club and Philadelphia, and in the Cable 
Matches against Berlin and Buenos Aires. 

This year Mr + Phillips cast aside temporarily 
the sterner calls of duty, figuratively took off 
his coat, and was once again in the thick of the 
fray for the club title. His play today is as 
rich in ideas as ever. He produced some fine 
specimens of chess, as will be seen in the 
appended examples, He scored seven points 
defeating Boris Blum in erstwhile champion of 
Canada, and Oscar Tenner, among others. 

Mr. Phillips has always been identified as 



HAROLD M. PHILLIPS 


Manhattan Chess Club Championship 1939-40 

RUV LOPEZ 


H. JVL Phillips 
White 


B . B I u m i n 

Black 


a patron and promoter of chess activities. As 
chairman of the International Team Tourna- 
ment Committees, he organized and sent abroad 
three United States World's Championship 
teams. He was mainly instrumental in getting 
under way the present system of tournaments 
for the American Chess Championship; he was 
the chairman of the committee that organized 
the first such tournament in 1936, 


Manhattan 

C* G, Championship 

1 939-1940 


RUY 

LOPEZ 


0. Tenner 

H. M. 

Phi Hips 

White 


Black 

1 P-K4 

P-K4 

20 R-RG 

B-B4 

2 Kt~KB3 

Kt-Q83 

21 BxB 

QxB 

3 B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

22 B-B1- 

KR-K1 

4 B-R4 

Kt-B3 

23 R x R c h 

RxR 

5 0-0 

KtxP 

24 P-R3 

Kt-K4 

6 P-Q4 

P-QKt4 

25 B-K3 

KtxKtch 

7 B-Kt3 

P-Q4 

26 PxKt 

P-Q5 

8 PxP 

B-K3 

27 PxP 

PxP 

9 P-B3 

B-K2 

28 B-B4 

P-Q6 

10 QK1-Q2 

KtxKt 

29 P-Kt3 

R-Q1 

11 QxKt 

Kt-QR4 

30 B„Q2 

P-Kt5 

12 B-B2 

P-QB4 

31 R-B6 

B-B6 

13 Q-B4 

0-0 

32 Q-R4 

Q-Q4 

14 Q-Kt3 

P-B4 

33 R-B5 

Q-Q5 

15 PxP e.p. 

BxP 

34 QxQ 

RxQ 

16 R-K1 

Q-Q2 

35 R-B8ch 

K-B2 

17 B-K3 

QR-B1 

36 R~B7ch 

K-K3 

18 P-QR4 

Kt-B5 

Resigns 

19 PxP 

PxP 

* 



1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

36 

P-Kt3 

Kt-Kt3 

2 

Kt-K. B3 

Kt-QB3 

37 

R-Q1 

P-B4 

3 

B~Kt5 

P-QR3 

33 

B-B3 

KLB1 

4 

B-R4 

KLB3 

39 

R-K5 

R-R3 

5 

P-Q3 

P-Q3 

40 

QxQ 

KtxQ 

6 

P-B3 

B-K2 

41 

R-Q7 

KtxP 

7 

0-0 

P-QKt4 

42 

B-Q5 

R-KtSch 

8 

B-B2 

0-0 

43 

K-B 1 

K-R2 

9 

R-K 1 

B-Q2 

44 

P-K 7 

KtxP 

10 

QKt Q2 

Kt-KI 

45 

R (7) xKt 

K-R3 

11 

P-Q4 

PxP 

46 

B-K4 

R-Q3 

12 

PxP 

B-Kt5 

47 

Rx BP 

R-Q7 

13 

P-KR3 

B-R4 

48 

P-B3 

P- Kt3 

14 

P KKt4 

B-Kt3 

49 

P-R4 

PxP 

15 

Kt-BI 

P-K R4 

50 

Px P 

R-QR7 

16 

Kt-Kt3 

PxP 

51 

P-R5 

R-R5 

17 

PxP 

Kt B3 

52 

R-B6 

K-R4 

18 

KLR4 

B-R2 

53 

R-R7ch 

K-Kt4 

19 

K Kt-B5 

R-K 1 

54 

R-B5c h 

K-B5 

20 

B-Kt5 

K1-Q2 

55 

K-B2 

R-R7ch 

21 

Ktx Boh 

KtxKt 

56 

B-B2 

R-B4 

22 

B-K13 

K-B1 

57 

R-R4c h 

K-Kt4 

23 

Q-B3 

B-Kt3 

58 

R-Kt4ch 

K-R3 

24 

P-K5 

Px P 

59 

R-B6 

K- Kt2 

25 

PxP 

Kt-Q B4 

60 

R ( Kt4) xPch K-B2 

26 

B-Q5 

R-Ktl 

61 

R-R6 

K-Kt2 

27 

P-K6 

P-KB3 

62 

R ( R6)-Q6 

K-B 1 

28 

BxP 

K-Ktl 

63 

K-Kt3 

R-B2 

29 

BxKt 

QxQB 

64 

R-B8ch 

K-K2 

30 

Kt-B5 

BxKt 

65 

RxP 

R-Kt2ch 

31 

PxB 

R-KB1 

66 

K-B4 

R-B2ch 

32 

Q-R5 

R-B3 

67 

B-B5 

R-Q7 

33 

R-K 3 

R-Q1 

68 

R-R7ch 

K-B3 

34 

B-Kt2 

QR-KB1 

69 

R xRch 

KxR 

35 

Q-Kt5 

Kt-R5 

70 

P-R6 

Resigns 


The New York State Tournament 

By Robert F. Brand 


The annua! meeting of the New York State 
Chess Association was held at Colgate Uni- 
versity, Hamilton, from August 17 to 24. Forty- 
four entrants participated in the individual 
championship tourneys while foursomes from 
five counties sought the custody of the Genesee 
Cup, 

Robert Will man won the New York State 
championship, leading one of the strongest 
fields which has ever competed for the honor, 
One point; behind and tied for second and 
third places were Anthony Santasiere and Jack 
Soudakoff. Fourth place went to Dr, Walter 
Cruz, champion of Brazil in 1940 and 1938, 
who is now on leave in this country doing 
medical research work in a Rochester hospital. 

Wi liman thus gains custody for the coming 
year of the Binghamton Chess Club silver 
trophy, which was awarded last year to Arnold 
Denker. This is Wi liman’s first win of the 
New York State championship. The trophy 
becomes the permanent possession of the first 
man to win it three times, Denker and 
Isaac Kashdan have each won it twice, yet 
neither player was on hand this year to get 
in the final leg. 

The County Team Contest was divided into 
two sections this year, a Class A section and a 
Class B section. Only those counties repre- 
sented in Class A played for the state county- 
team championship, while Class B was for 
' second teams” and for any other teams not 
considered strong enough to enter in Class A, 


The Class A contest, and with it possession for 
one year of the Genesee silver trophy, was won 
by Onondaga County (Syracuse Chess Club), 
Onondaga also won the cup in 1938, 1935, 
1934, 1915 and 191.4. 

Robert Wiilman was bom in New York 
City in 1908, A resident of that city all his 



C. HAROLD KING 

President of the N. Y. State Chess Association 


NEW YORK STATE 

CHAMPIONSHIP 

c 

pi 

B 

% 


Soudakoff 

JN 

2 

i U 

& 

V 

d 

Ci 

•u 

-C 

u 

d 

Ti 

■rt- 

pH 

pn;s3A!Q 

c 

■ H — 4 

g 

■4— J 

s 

0 

n 

X 

I 

d 

0 

v; 

u 

Phillips 

Kolin 

Totals 

Rank 

IjRobert Wiilman (N.Y.C.) j -\y 2 11 

Vi\ J- \Vi 

1 

y 2 

1 

1 

1 

I||9 -2 

1 

2 1 Anthony Santasiere (N,Y.C) . , . . * . . \ y 2 

-1 0 

1 /"2 ¥2 

‘/ 2 |1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

|8 -3 

II-III 

3 1 Jack Soudakoff (N,Y,C) 

0 

1 


0 

1 

1 

1 

¥2 

yy 2 

1 

l 

8 -3 j 

inn 

4 

~ 5 

| Walter Cruz, (Rio dc Janeiro, Brazil) . . y 2 

0 

1 


0 l|l/ 2 

1 

1 0 

l 

1 

|7 -4 ||IV 

Irving Chernev (Brooklyn) , 0 

Vi 

0 

1 


Vi\Vi i 

0 

1 

l 

1 1 

|6y 2 -4y 2 ||v 

6 1 Harry Fajans (N.Y.C) 


0 

0 y 2 —| 0 

y 2 

ii|y 2 

i 

jo' 

1 1 

T 

|5W-3W||VLVI1 

|5i /2 -5vy[vrvn 

7 1 Ola-f Ulvestad (Plainsfieid, Mass) .... 0 \y 2 

j c 
~ — - 

hJ 

T 

tj 

— W 2 

yy 2 

8 Boris Biumin (N.Y.C.) i/ 2 

0 

Vz 

0 

0 |i/ 2 

y 2 

— 

0 

1 

1 

1 j; .6 jjvm 

9 Martin Hago (N.Y,C) . . , 

0 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

“ — - 

1 

1 1 0 

i 4 1 

■IX-X 

10(E. S. Jackson (N.Y.C.) 

0 

0 

y 2 

1 

0 

y 2 

y 2 

0 

0 

j 1 

y 2 | 

1 4 -7 

IX-X 

lljHarold M. Phillips (N,Y,C) 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 -L 

[2 -9 1 

|XI 

12|Henry Kolm (N.Y.C.) 

0 

o_ 

0 

0 

0 

oj 0 

0 

1 

y 2 

0 

(~fxi/ 2 -9y 2 |)xii 


155 








156 


T h e C h e s s Review 


life, he makes his living as a claim agent. He 
has earned two college degrees, an A,B. from 
the City College of New York and an A.M. 
from Columbia University* A member of the 
Manhattan Chess Club, he tied for first place 
in the club championship in 1932 with Abra- 
ham Kupchik, losing in the playoff. In 1933 
Will man won the Manhattan Club champion- 
ship outright. Also in 1933 he played a match 
with A. C Simonson and won by a score of 
5^ to 11/2* In the 1939 N. Y. State Assn, 
championship, he tied for 6th, 7th and 8th 
places with K. O. Mott-Smith and Joseph 
Plata* 

At the annual meeting of the N.Y.S.C the 
following officers were elected for the coming 
year: President, C. Harold King of Hamilton; 
Vice-Presidents, Robert If Brand of Cazenovia, 
Lynn Bryant of Binghamton and Paul Giers 
of Syracuse; and Secretary-Treasurer, George 
H. Wilson of Union, 

The 72-y earmold veteran, Dr* Emanuel Las- 
ker, graced the Congress with a simultaneous 
exhibition against 20 boards on the evening 
of Aug. 23, winning 18 and drawing 2. The 
tournament was under the able management 
of L. Walter Stephens of New York, 


COUNTY TEAM SCORES 
C L ASS A (County l earn cha m p to ns hi p ) Pot nts 


Onondaga (Syracuse) 15 — 1 

Broome (Binghamton) ........ iy 2 — 8 14 

Monroe (Rochester) . , 6 y 2 — 9]/ 2 


Dutchess (Poughkeepsie) . 41/2-1 H/2 

Class B (for second lea nts) Points 

Madison (Cazcnovia, Hamilton 

and Sherrill) l \/ 2 — 4b 2 

Monroe (Rochester) 7 — 5 

Broome (Binghamton) . * 6y 2 — 5 l / 2 

Onondaga (Syracuse) . 3 — 9 


CLASS A TOURNAMENT 

T-2. Mrs. Mary Bain (N.Y.C) 4y 2 _2y 2 

1,-2. Clarence W. Hewlett, Jr, 

(Schenectady) „ . 

3.-4. Arthur Fox (Albany) 4 -3 

3.-4* D. Francis Searle (Rome) . .... A -3 
5. Clarence W. Hewlett, Sr., 

(Schenectady) 3 1 /^-3 1 /^ 

6.-8. Mrs. Gisela Grcsscr (N.Y.C.) .. 2*^-4^ 
6.-8. John W. Barnhart (N.Y.C.) ... 2^-41^ 
6.-8. Max Herzberger (Rochester) *.. 2y 2 Ay 2 

CLASS B. TOURNAMENT 

1.-2. Stephen Osley (Little Falls) . , . .6^-21^ 

1,-2. Frank Valvo (Albany). 

3.-5* Frederick Ekstrom (Brooklyn) .* 5^~ 3y 2 



Doughty Warrior: LASKER 


3-5* Charles Helms (Brooklyn) 5 14.314 

3.-5* Steven Shaw (Hamilton).. 5 I / 2 -3 1 /2 

6* Robert B. Brand (Cazenovia) . . A -5 
7* Charles A, Graves (Nelson) . . , , 3^-5^2 
8.^9. Walter Froehlich (Syracuse) * . * .3 -6 

8.-9- George Mundt (Hamilton) .... 3 -6 
10. Mrs. Ethel Harrison (N.Y.C.) . . .2 -7 

CLASS C TOURNAMENT 


1 * Ralph B. Marshall (Perry) .6 -1 

2. .Louis Pcrsingcr (N.Y.C).. 5 -2 

3. A. Bertram Davis (Oneonta) ^/i- 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 /i 

4. Frank Baldwin (Brooklyn) ...... .4 -3 

5. George A. Donohue (Hastings- 

on- Hud son) 314 .. 3 I 4 

6 . R i c h a rd D owning ( Sy r acu sc ) 2 y 2 A V 2 

7. Samuel Abbuhl (Cazenovia) . . * . , 1 y 2 -5y 2 

8 . Francis Kingsland-Smith (New" 

Brunswick, N. J.) . . . 1 A 


AMATEUR TOURNAMENT 


1. Hermann Helms (N.Y.C ) 5 -0 

2, George Wilson (Union) 2l /2- 2l /2 

3 -5. C Harold King (Hamilton) . * , .2 -3 

3-5* Gerald Shaffer (Canaslota) .,*.2 .3 

3 -5* Allen Williams (Canastota) ... .2 -3 

6. Barton Gifford (Canastola) .... V/ 2 -3^ 


A game which exemplifies that ever- fascinat- 
ing phenomenon: the attack without Queens * 

INDIAN DEFENSE 

(Notes by A. TO. Santaslere) 

B* Blumin A. E* Santasiere 

White Black 


1 P-Q4 

2 P-QB4 

3 K1-QB3 

4 Q-Kt3 


Kt-K B3 
P-KKt3 
P Q4 


Premature, in my opinion. 


PxP 




October, 19 4 0 


157 


5 QxBP 

6 Q-R4ch 

Q-Kt5ch is usually played. 

B3; 7 Kt-B3, Kt-Q4 ; 8 QxKtP; 

() Kt B3, Kt-Q4; 7 P-K4E P-QR3 \ 


well. 

6 . . , . 

More effective is , 
P-QK14 etc. 

7 QxQch 

8 P-K4 

9 B-KB4 
10 Kt-B3 


B-K3 

a i i i 

After 8 . . . Kt- 
9 KKt-Kt5 or 
Black stands 

Q-Q2 

. P-B3 followed by . * , 

QKtxQ 

Kt-Kt3 

P-B3 


With passive opposition. White will soon 
complete his development and sit snugly be- 
hind his strong center. Therefore Black strives 
to upset White’s plans by immediate, it un- 
conventional, counterplay, 

10 , . , , Kt-R4 

11 B-K5 P-B3 

12 B-B7 B-R3 


13 B-K2 Kt-KB5 

14 BxKt BxB 


Now, at least, he has 2 Bs. 

15 P-GKt3 

To forestall the annoying . . . Kt-B5; but the 
prophylaxis is worse than the consequence of 
invasion, for now Black has the target for 
attack. 


15 ... . K-B2 

16 0-0 KR-Q1 

. 17 QR-Q1 

Unsuspecting — else he would have played 
KR-Q1, Bui, as the text indicates, Rlumin Is 
intent on his own plans, which include a for- 
ward thrust with the KBP, Actually, the idea 
proves too slow, as Black's attack gathers 
momentum quickly. 

17 , . . . P-QR4! 

18 Kt-KI B-B2 

19 P-B4 P-R5 

20 P-B5 .... 


The only alternative was P-QKt4— leaving a 
bad hole at his QB4. 

20 ... . KtPxP 

21 KPxP B-Q4 

22 KtxB KtxKt 

23 R-B3 .... 

Still under the delusion that he has the initi- 
ative* I expected B-B4, and intended the reply 
. * , P-Kt4. 


23 ... . 

PxP 

24 PxP 

R-R7 

25 R-B2 

m * * ft 

Threatening B-R5eh. 

25 ... . 

K~Kt2 

26 B-B4? 

■ m ■ v 

A blunder — but the 

position was certainly 

beyond redemption. 

26 ... . 

BxPch 

27 K-B1 

Kt-K6 mate 

These upstate tournaments are nightmares 

— only fanatics should 

attempt them I On the 


day following this game, for instance, my 
worthy opponent played a four hour game in 
the morning, eighteen rounds of a rapid transit 
tournament in the afternoon (finishing second), 
and a four hour game at night! 


Incidentally, I won every game when I had 
black, Perhaps I should begin to play blackly 
with white! 


Black upsets ins opponent's positional plans 
very cleverly , 

INDIAN DEFENSE 


(Notes by X Soudakoff) 


O. Ulvestad 

White 

1 P-Q4 

2 Kt-KB3 

3 P-KKt3 

4 B-K12 

5 Kt-R3 


J. Soudakoff 
Black 
Kt-KB3 
P-KKt3 
B-Kt2 
0-0 
I i i i 


One of those departures from the conven- 
tional for which Ulvestad is w T ell-known; it is 
instructive to watch the movements of this Kt, 


5 

V ■ i i t 

P-Q4 


6 0-0 

P-B4 


7 P-B3 

Kt-B3 


8 Kt-B2 

Kt-K5 


9 B*K3 

PxP 


10 QKtxP 

P-K4 


11 Kt-Kt3 

■i ■ i ■ 


White has succeeded in provoking 

Black’s 

center Ps, which 

he hopes will prove 

weak* 

11 ... . 

Kt-R4 


Better was the 

developing move * * 

* B-K3* 


SENSATIONAL OFFERl! 

A complete set of five bound volumes 
of The Chess Review (covering the years 
1935, 1936, 1937, 1938 and 1939), whose > 
regular value ia $3:50 apiece or $17,50 
per set* is now available for only $ 7 . 50 ! 
Individual volumes may be had at $2*00, 
The extraordinary character ..of this bar- 
gain offer may be seen from the follow- 
ing features: "" : J ■ " "" ■ 

• Attractive bindings 

* More than 1200 games of high t 

quality i 

• Annotations by Euwe, Fine, 
Reshevsky, Kashdan, Horowitz, 
Reinfeld and many other noted 
analysts 

• 1500 choice problems supple- 
mented by critical comments 
from noted problem authorities 

• Descriptions of important tour- 
naments which are of lasting 
historic value 

* Analysis of important opening 
innovations of permanent worth 

# Biographical studies and other 
articles of general interest 

* Cartoons, photographs, anec- 
dotes and jokes. 

The greatest value in the history 
, of chess! 1 

This offer will expire December 31, 1940. 

Take advantage of ; it at once to be 

certain of getting your set. 


158 


The Chess Review 


As played, Black loses valuable time and sue- 

ceeds merely in exchanging a 

piece* 

12 KtxKt 

QxKt 

13 Kt-Q2 

KtxKt 

14 QxKt 

B-K3 

15 B-R6 

KR-Q1 

More accurate was * * * RxB. 


16 BxB 

KxB 

17 KR-Q1 

R-Q2 

18 Q-K3 

Q-B2 

19 R-Q2 

P-QR3 

To release the QR* 


20 P-KB4 

i i ■ ■ 

More pressure on Black's KP, but the move 

creates some weaknesses in 

White's position. 

20 ... * 

P-B3 

21 QR-Q1 

QR-Q1 

22 P-KR3 

vail 

This turns out to be had. 


22 , 

B-B2 

23 P-R3 

P-Q5 

24 PxQP 

PxQP 

The QP is immune from capture. If 25 RxP, 

Q-Kt3 wins (but not 25 * . . 

Q-E4 ; 26 Q-QB3 

nor 26 ... . RxR; 26 RxR, Q-Kt.3; 27 R-K4). 

25 Q-Q3 

B-B5 

26 Q-Ktl 

„ . . . 

If 26 Q-B2, P-Q6; 27 PxP. Q-Kt3ch: 28 K-R2, 

B Kt6 winning the exchange* 


26 * * . . . 

Q-Kt3 

. .27 K-R2 

R-K2 

23 &-B3 

R (1 )-K1 

29 R-K1 

R-K6 

30 Q*B1 

Q-K3 


With the double threat of - * . RxB and . 


F-Q(L 

31 P'B5 

32 B.R5 

33 RxP 

34 R-KR4 

35 RxB 


PxP 

R-K2 

BxP 

Q-K4 

RxRch 


The obvious . . , QxFch would have won as 

well. 


36 BxR QxBch 

37 K-Ktl Q-B6 


White resigns. If 38 Q-Rtich, simply , , , 
K-Ktl. If 38 Q-B3, Q-Q8ch. If 3K R-KB4, 
QxPeh; 39 K-B1 P QxPch; 40 K Ktl {or 40 K-B2, 
Q-R7ch), R'K7 ; 41 Q-B7ch, K-Kt3 etc. 

By the way, 37 * . * R-Q2 was even simpler 
and more conclusive. 


Fine posit urn play is topped off' with a neat 
finish. 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 


(Notes by Fred 

Dr. W, Cruz 
White 


Reinfeld) 

M* D* Hago 
Black 


1 P-Q4 P-Q4 

2 P-QB4 P-K3 

3 Kt-QB3 P-QB3 


4 Kt-B3 PxP 

5 P-K3 P-QKt4 

6 P-QR4 B-Kt5 


Since White regains the gambit P in short 
order, it would doubtless be better to plav 6 
. . . P-KtS; 7 Kt~R2* Kt-KR3; 8 BxP, BKt2 
followed in due course by , . , P-B4 etc. 

7 B-Q2 Kt-B3 

The once popular variation 7 . . , P-QR4 ; 



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G CT o B E R , 19 4 0 


159 


8 PxP, BxKt; 9 BxB, PxP; 10 P-QKt8, B-Kt2; 
11 PxP, P-Kt5 is effectively avoided by 10 P- 
Q5! giving White a beautiful game. 


li 27 . 

re capture. 

Ill 27 . 


It-KtT ; 28 BxB and Black cannot 
R-Kt3; 28 B-B5, R-Kt7 (if 28 . , , 


B 

PxP 

BxKt 

R-Ktl: 29 

BxB P KtxB: 30 

9 

BxB 

PxP 

Kt-B6ch) ; 

29 BxB ? KtxB; 

10 

P-QKt3 

0-0 

forced; 30 BxKtch and wins. 

11 

PxP 

PxP 

28 

BxR 

12 

BxP 

Q-B2 

29 

R-B7 


13 

14 

15 


There is not much point to this, as it is 
clear the Q cannot remain indefinitely on the 
open file. White now devotes his energies 
to placing his pieces to good advantage and 
setting up a strong center— made possible by 
Black's early surrender Of the center. White's 
Bs are also bound to put a word in later on. 

Q-Kt3 Kt-B3 16 Q-R3 Q-Q1 

0-0 B-Q2 17 Kt-Q2 Q-K2 

KR-B1 KR-Ktl 18 QxQ KtxQ 

li' Black expected to improve his prospects 
with the exchange of Qs, he Is soon disill u- 
sioned. The combination of White's Bs and 
strong center soon proves very troublesome. 

19 P-K4 ICB1 

20 P-B3 B-Kt4 

Futile. 

21 B.KtS 

22 B-Kt4 

23 Kt-B4 

24 Kt-R5! 

A fine move which 
latiom 

24 ... « RxRch? 

Suicidal. . . . K-Kl should have been played. 

25 RxR B-Q2 

26 B-Q6! R-Kt4 

26 . * . R-B1 is met by 27 RxRch, BxR; 28 
B-R4 ! Kt-Ktl (29 , . * B-Q2? loses a piece after 
29 BxB, KtxB ; 30 Kt-B6) ; 29 B BS followed 
by B-Kt7 and the QRP soon goes lost. 

Strangely enough, the exchange is lost by 
force after the text! 

Mago 


R-B1 
P-QR3 
QR-Ktl 
* * ■ ■ 

requires careful calcu- 



Cruz 

27 B-R4 ! K-K1 

White's Bs are all over the pi ace , and Black 
must surrender to the inevitable, as the fol- 
lowing proves: 

I 27 . , . RxKt; 28 BxR, P-Kt.4 (if 28 . . . 
KtxB?? 29 R-B8 mate): 29 R~E7 followed by 
B-B6 and P-QG with a winning game. 


Or 81 


U 32 


29 B-R3, R-Ktl 

BxB 
Kt(3)-Kt1 
B-B5 P-B3 

Kt-Kt7 B-Q6 

. . . K-B2; 32 Kt-Q6ch and wins. 

32 Kt-Q6ch Resigns 

. . K-Ql; 33 B l<t(i etc. 


30 

31 


Deciding game in the last round! 

RUY LOPEZ 


R. Wi liman 


J. Soudakoff 


White 


Black 


1 P-K4 

P-K4 

22 KR-KB1 

P-&3 

2 Kt-K B3 

Kt-QB3 

23 K-K3 

P-QB4 

3 B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

24 R-B2 

R-Q3 

4 BxKt 

QPxB 

25 R-KKtl 

R (3) -K3 

5 Kt-B3 

B-KKt5 

26 P-B5 

R{3)-K2 

6 P-KR3 

BxKt 

27 P-KKt4 

PxP 

7 QxB 

B-B4 

23 RxP 

R-KR1 

& P-Q3 

Kt-K2 

29 R (2)-Kt2 

R-R2 

9 Q-Kt3 

Kt-Kt3 

30 K-B3 

K-Q3 

10 P-KR4 

P-KR4 

31 K-K3 

R-Q2 

11 Kt-QI 

Q-Q2 

32 R-R2 

R-B2 

12 B-Kt5 

B,K2 

33 P-R5 

K~K2 

13 Kt-K3 

0-0-0 

34 R-Kt6 

K-Q2 

14 Kt-B6 

BxB 

35 K-B3 

K-K2 

15 QxB 

Kt-B5 

36 K^Kt4 

R-R3 

16 P-K Kt3 

Kt-K3 

37 R-Kt2 

R-R2 

17 Q-K7 

Kt-Q5 

38 P-R6 

K-B1 

18 QxQch 

RxQ 

39 K-R5 

K-Ktl 

19 KtxKt 

RxKt 

40 R-R2 

K-B1 

20 K-K2 

K-Q2 

41 K-Kt4 

K-Ktl 

21 P-KB4 

R-K1 

42 K-B3 

« B fe b 


Soudakoff 




Willman 


42 


Lulled by the interminable 
regroupings. Black falls into 
Simply . . . R-R1-R2 etc., 

PxPch ! 

R-R8ch 
R (8)-R6 1 

in Zugzwang! 


K-B1 ? 

groupings and 
a. lost game, 
was in order. 


43 

44 

45 


R (R2)xP 
K-K2 

■ ifl k ■ 

is m z.ugzwang ! He cannot move his 
R moves are likewise out (45 . . , R- 
RxP), Pawn moves by Black would 


Black 
K, and 
R2; 46 

Of course only postpone the evil hour. 



160 


The Chess Review 


If 49 


45 * . , . RxR 

46 PxR R-Kt2 

47 K-Kt4 K-K3 

48 K-R5 P-B4 

49 K-Kt5 Resigns 

♦ , F-B5; 50 R-R7 wins. 


After winning t.he exchange by means of a 
clever finesse cm the fortieth move, Santa- 
siere found himself confronted with a blocked 
position which seemed impassable. Finally, 
after eight hours of play, he undertook the 
break-through — but, as Soudakoffs hen dish 
counterplay proves, it was still too soon!! 

Soudakoff 












4 






i 





t 
















Santasiere 

79 P-Kt4? 

A mistake, but surely a very plausible one, 

79 P-Kt4[ 

The moment Black has been praying for, 

80 BPxP PxP 

Black’s cooped-up pieces suddenly come to 
life, and are all the more violent for the re- 
pression they have been subjected to in the 
previous play. If now 81 BxP, BxB; 82 RxB, 
Q-R8 and wins. 

81 R-R1 Kt-QG 

Threatening mate on the move. 

82 Q-BG Q-K1 [ 

Still maintaining the attack, what with the 

threatened , . „ R-B2 followed by a Queen ir- 
ruption beginning with . + , Q-QB1-B4ch. 

83 P-Kt6 , . . . 

"ThaFll keep you busy, my boy!” But it 
doesn’t 

83 ... . Kt-K4J 

84 P- Kt7 R-B2 

85 Q-Kt5 Q-QB11 

Calmly lighting a Murad. If the Pawn 
queens, he mates in a few moves. 

86 R (4) - R2 QxPl 

Likewise. 

87 R-Q2 Q-B6ch 

88 KxP Kt-B6E 

89 BxKt RxB 

What a man! If now 90 R-Kl, Q-B5ch; 91 
R-Q4, Q-B7ch etc. 


90 R (1 )-R2 B-B4ch I 

White resigns, for if 91. QxB, Q-KS mate, 
A tough break for Santasiere, but the handy 
way in which Soudakoff smoked out White’s 
smug King merits high praise. — F.R T 


Dfdwhh 

variations 

don't always 

lead to a 

draw. 





FRENCH 

DEFENSE 


O. Ulvestad 

M. D. 

Hago 

White 

Black 

1 P-K4 

P-K 3 

21 B-Q2 

Q-K2 

2 P-Q4 

P-Q4 

22 Kt-BI 

P-KKt4 

3 PxP 

PxP 

23 Q-B5ch 

Q K3 

4 B-K3 

B-KB4 

24 BxP 

QxQ 

5 K1-QB3 

P-QB3 

25 PxQ 

K-Q2 

6 B-Q3 

BxB 

26 P-K Kt4 

P-B3 

7 QxB 

B-Q3 

27 B-Q2 

R-K2 

8 K K t - K 2 

KPQ2 

28 Kt-Q3 

P-Kt3 

9 Kt-Kt3 

BxKt? 

29 Kt-B4 

K-K1 

10 RPxB 

K Kt-B3 

30 B-Kt4 

KR-R2 

11 P-B3 

P-K Kt3 ? 

31 BxR 

RxB 

12 G-0-0 

Q-R4 

32 K-B1 

Kt-R2 

13 R-R6 

0-0-0 

33 Kt-K6 

Kt-Kt4 " 

14 P-KKt4 

QR-K1 

34 KtxKt 

BPxKt 

15 K-Ktl 

R-K3 

35 K-Q2 

K-B2 

16 B-Q2 

Q-Q1 

36 RxP 

KtxR 

17 QR-R1 

KLB1 

37 RxKt 

P-B4 

18 Kt-K2 

Kt-Ktl 

33 R-R7oh 

K-B3 

19 KR-R3 

R-K1 

39 RxR 

KxR 

20 B-Kt4 

P-KR3 

40 P-83 

Resigns 


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O c; T O ft Ji R , 1 9 4 0 


161 


Superior position play triumphs neatly , 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 


H* M* Phillips A. E. Santasiere 

White Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-QB4 

16 

P-QR4 

P-R4 

2 

Kt-KB3 

P-Q3 

17 

KR-Q1 

P-R5 

3 

P-04 

PxP 

18 

B-B3 

P-B4 

4 

KtxP 

Kt-KB3 

19 

P-B4 

Kt (4)-Kt5 

6 

B-Q3 

KLB3 

20 

P-B5 

P-K5 

6 

P-QB3 

P-K4 

21 

B-Kt2 

R-Q6 

7 

Kt-Kt3 

P-Q4 

22 

R-R3 

KR-Q1 

8 

PxP 

QxP 

23 

R-QB1 

Rx Kt(7) 

9 

0-0 

B-K 3 

24 

KtxR 

RxKt 

10 

B-K2 

R-Q1 

25 

PxP 

Kt-Q5 

11 

B-K Kt5 

B-K2 

26 

P-Kt7 

Kt-K7ch 

12 

QxQ 

KtxQ 

27 

K-R1 

Kt-R3 

13 

BxB 

KxB 

28 

R-QKtl 

B-Q4 

14 

P-Kt3 

P^QKt3 


Resigns 


15 

QKt-02 

P-QR4 






Boll from 

the 

blue! 



QUEEN’S PAWN OPENING 


A. E* Santasiere 


E. S* Jackson 


White 



Black 

1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

10 

QKt-B3 

P-R3 

Z 

P-K3 

P-Q4 

11 

B-Q2 

P-Q Kt4 

3 

Kt-KB3 

P-K3 

12 

B-K1 

Kt-QR4 

4 

B-Q3 

P-B4 

13 

B-R4 

Q-B1 

5 

P*B3 

Kt-B3 

14 

Q-K2 

B-B3 

6 

Kt-KS 

B-Q3 

15 

PxP 

BxKt 

7 

P-KB4 

E-Q2 

16 

KtxB 

Kt-Q2 

S 

Kt-Q2 

Q-K2 

17 

Kt-Kt6 1 

Resigns 

9 

0-0 

P-QR3 





PENN STATE TOURNEY 

The Second Annual Congress of the Penm 
sylvania State Chess Federation was held in 
the sumptuous quarters of the William Penn 
Hotel in Pittsburgh over the Labor Day week- 
end, Main event on the program was the 
tournament for the State title, which attracted 
sixteen entrants from almost as many sectors 
of the Keystone State. 

With three days allotted for play, the en- 
trants were divided into two sections for a 
round-robin, with leaders in each group to 
play off for the championship. In Section I, 
William Steckei of Allentown, former title- 
holder, had things all his own way, drawing 
with Johnson of Pittsburgh, and winning every 
other game* The runner-up was Liggett of 
Washington, Pa., 41^-21/^, and third and fourth 
prizes, at 3*4-314, were shared by Johnson 
and McCready of Pittsburgh* 

In Section II, the struggle for supremacy 
was much more exciting* L, W. Gardner, 
now leading chcssist of Pittsburgh, equalled 
Steckel's score of 6 14 - 14 , his draw being 
against Anton Linder of Erie. But right on 
his heels, with the issue undecided until the 
final round, was Firestone of Pittsburgh, who 
lost only to Gardner in the decisive game of 
the section, and wound up with 6-1. Bolden 


of Philadelphia was third, 4^-2^ and A. N* 
Towsen of Harrisburg fourth, with 4-3. 

Other scores were: 

Section 1 

Wilkinson, Philadelphia, 3-4; Erdeky and 
Stevenson, 2y 2 Ay 2 ; Seiter, 2-5* 

Section II 

Linder, 3 *4 -3 *4; Larsen, 2-5; Beck, 1-6; 
Dolde, i/ 2 -6i/ 2 * 

Thus it was Steckei vs. Gardner, one game 
to a finish, with the title at stake* After a 
quiet enough beginning, in the exchange vari- 
ation of the Queen's Gambit Declined, the 
game took a sudden turn when Gardner sacri- 
ficed a Knight at his 26th turn* He obtained 
three Pawns for the piece, but might have 
encountered much more resistance except for 
an error by Steckei (29 Kt-K5?), which lost 
quickly* 29 RxR was correct at that point* 

Gardner, former North Carolina champion, 
participated for the first time in this event. 
He will undoubtedly be heard from frequently 
in Pennsylvania chess* 

The Tournament Director was I* A. Horo- 
witz of the Chess Review f especially invited 
from New York for the task* He found every- 
thing so ably arranged that his duties were but 
slightly more arduous than those of the many 
interested spectators at the event. Horowitz 
opened the proceedings with a stimulating lec- 
ture on chess. 

At the business meeting of the Federation, 
W. M. Byland of Pittsburgh was elected Pres- 
ident, to succeed W. M. Hart, Jr*, now residing 
in Wilmington, Del. Other officers elected 


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THE CHESS REVIEW 

25 W. 43rd STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y, 


162 


ThK ChKSS RhVU’W 



W. M. BYLAND 


were Harry Cooke of Pittsburgh, Vice- Presi- 
dent, and Anion Linder, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Much of the credit for the success of the 
Congress was due to the indefatiguable efforts 
of the newly elected President and Vice- Presi- 
ded, and W. P, Holbrook of the tournament 
committee, Anton Linder will be the guiding 
spirit of the next P. S, C. F. Congress, which 
will be held at brie, Pa,, over the Labor Day 
week-end, 1941. 

An innovation was an elaborate program 
book issued by the Federation. It contains 
articles by Horowitz and Dr. Albrecht Buschke, 
and an inspirational message by Byland, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer of the .Federation, until his 
elevation to the highest office. We quote: 

' The lights have gone out on all chess ac- 
tivities in a great portion of the world. We, in 
this country, do not know when or in what 
form these lights will ultimately shine forth 
again, but until they do, America must assume 
the position and the responsibility of leader- 
ship in the world of chess. We can all do our 
part — by supporting individually our state 
chess associations, which in turn lend support 
and give meaning to our national organization, 
the United Stales Chess Federation/' 


QUEEN'S GAM BIT DECLINED 



W. H. Steckel 

L. W, Gardner 


White 


Black 


1 

P-Q4 

Kt KB3 

5 PxP 

PxP 

2 

P-QB4 

P-K3 

6 P-K3 

B-K2 

3 

Kt QB3 

P-Q4 

7 B-Q3 

P-B3 

4 

B-K16 

QKt-Q2 

S Q-B2 

0-0 


9 

Kt-B3 

R-K 1 

10 

Kt-K5 

Kt-BI 

11 

0*0 

Kt-Kt5 

12 

BxB 

QxB 

13 

KtxKt 

Bx Kt 

14 

QR-K1 

QR-Q1 

15 

K-R 1 

Q-R5 

16 

P-B3 

B-R4 

17 

P-K Kt3 

Q-R6 

IS 

Q*B2 

R-K2 

19 

Kt-K2 

Q-Q2 

20 

Kt-B4 

B-Kt3 


21 

BxB 

RPxB 

22 

Kt-Q3 

QR-K1 

23 

R-K2 

Q.B4 

24 

R-Q1 

Kt-Q2 

25 

K-K12 

Kt-03 

26 

P-KKt4 

KtxP 

27 

PxKt 

QxPch 

£S 

K-B1 

RxP 

29 

Kt-K5 

QxRch 

30 

QxQ 

RxQ 

31 

KxR 

P-B3 


Resigns 



THE WILDEST GAME AT VENTNOR! 

Once more U 7 vest ml shares the prize for the 
most interesting game for the spectators. 

INDIAN DEFENSE 


1 

/Y. 

<i 

3 

4 

5 

6 
7 
S 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 


O. U] vesta d H, Morris 


White 



Black 


P-Q4 

Kt-K B3 

17 

KtxKt 

PxKt 

Kt-K B3 

P-Q Kt3 

IS 

BxP 

Q-B2 

P-KK13 

B-Kt2 

19 

R-K3 

0-0 0 

B-Kt2 

P-B4 

20 

P-B4 

R-R6 

B-B4 

P-Q3 

21 

Q-Kt2 

QR-KR1 

P-B3 

P-Kt3 

22 

BxBch 

QxB 

0-0 

Q Kt-Q2 

23 

QxQch 

KxQ 

Q-Kt3 

P-KR3 

24 

RxP 

R-R8ch 

QKt-Q2 

B-Kt2 

25 

K-Kt2 

RxR 

KR-K1 

P-K Kt4 

26 

RxKtch 

K-B3 

BxKtP 

PxB 

27 

Rx BP 

RxP 

KtxP 

P-Q4 

28 

P-K 16 

RxPch 

P-K4 

P-B5 

29 

K-83 

R-KKtl 

Q-B2 

B-KR3 

30 

P-Kt7 

R-B7 

P-KR4 

BxKt 

31 

P-85 

RxPeh 

PxB 

KtxP 

32 

K-B4 

R-Q6 


M or 

ris 





Ulvestad 


33 P-B6 

RxPch 

37 

K-K16 

P-B7 

34 K-B5 

ft ( 5 ) -Q 1 

33 

RxR 

P B8(Q) 

35 RxP 

P-B6? 

39 

P-B7 

Q-QB5 

Black 

misses a win 

40 

PxR(Q) 

QxQ 

here by 

35 . . . P-Kt i ! 

41 

R-KB3 

Q-KIch 

36 R-R3 

R-Q6 

42 

K-Kt5 

Drawn 


REMEMBER TO . . * . 

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 


Problem Department 

By Vincent L, Eaton 

Address all correspondence relating to this department to V.L. Eaton, 2237 Q Street, W ashtngton, D.C, 

Qi jestions About Problem Mahers Will Be Answered Ip Accompanied By Return Postage. 


For any who have been so un fortunate as to 
miss the preceding installments of Mr. Alain 
White’s article, I should explain that the ini* 
tials “G," "M,” and il W” above a problem in- 
dicate that it is an example selected for 
publication by F, Gamage, Coming Mansfield, 
or Mil White, respectively. Nos, 1 C C 3-1 674 are 
originals for the “Review”; and these, with 
Nos. 1 675-16 SO, make up this month’s quota 
for the Solvers' Ladder. 

SIXTY TWO-MOVERS OF THE 
PAST SIXTY YEARS 

By Alain C. White 

In the 1930’s problems of the intricate “com- 
pensating’ 1 style of strategy have become in- 
creasingly numerous and interesting. Flaws 
in purity of motives have been eliminated and 
new thematic advances have been introduced. 
OS special depth are the combinations in Nos. 
1681-1689, inclusive. My only regret is that 
more examples could not be fitted into our 
brief selection. The strategy of these problems 
is not fully understood in some places, notably 
in the United Stales, and they deserve careful 
study* M is not possible to analyze them all, 
but No, 1686 furnishes a specially good ex- 
ample to study, and its fine play atones for 
the unhappy key (1 PxP). This key intro- 
duces two threats, 2 Bc5 and 2 Pe7. To defeat, 
both of these Black moves his Knights, In 
this problem there is no contingent threat, as 
in No. 1622, and Black must move carefully to 
defeat the original threats, playing either 1 
. . . Se3 or 1 , . , S1'3, These moves defeat the 
threat 2 Bc5 by shutting off the White Bishops, 
and they defeat the threat 2 Pe7 by opening the 
defensive lines of the Black Rooks, but these de- 
fensive results of Black's moves are compen- 
sated by the new opportunities they at the same 
time present to White. The interference of the 
Black Knights with the pinning action of the 
Black Queen frees the White Knight and al- 
lows him to threaten two new mates, at e4, 
and 15, these mates to become effective in turn 
when Black's guard upon each of the two 
squares by the Black Rooks is shut off. Thus, 
in each of the two thematic variations, two 
lines are affected in a manner advantageous 
to Black and two others in a manner advanta- 
geous to White, and the whole set forth with 
a simplicity of execution which amuses a deep 
sense of charm. 

Among the line-opening and line-closing mo- 
tives, which the composers of the 1 930's have 
balanced so cleverly one against another, the 
possible obstruction by Black or by White of the 
White lines of guard or attack has in particular 
been used to produce new compensating effects, 
Some of the results achieved have excelled by 
the depth of their thought, at a cost in poor econ- 
omy which sometimes appears to be some- 
what high: others happily have overcome all 
obstacles and captivated the solver by their 
extraordinary clarity and charm. Note* for 
example* now Black s pins by the Queen in No. 
16X4, 1 . . . Qb7 and 1 . . * Qd7, guide White's 


choice 01 Knight mates; or again how the un- 
pinned White Bishop in No. 1637 must choose 
his moves according to the way In which the 
Black Knights effect the unpins; or finally 
how the Black Knight determines the mate by 
the White King battery in No. 16X8 by shutting 
off the White guard alter 1 , . . Scti and 1. , * , 
Sf3. 

There would seem to be no end to the way 
in which ihe choice of related moves can be 
guided by the intricate give-and-take elements 
of the defensive and mating moves, and dual 
avoidance becomes one of the great motives 
in the two-movers of the 1930 J s. It is quite Impos- 
sible even to touch upon all these different em- 
bodiments of compensating strategy. One of the 
most pleasing involves the opening and closing 
o S' White lines of guard by the White mating 
move, as illustrated in No. 1683. If White should 
play 1 Sb4-d5ch in the initial position, the White 
guard of the Pe4 from the BaX would be shut 
off, while a new guard from the Ha4 was 
being opened up. So far there is neutralization 
of effort, but at the same time the guard by 
the Ra5 of the Pe5 would also have been shut 
off. Or if White should try playing 1 Sc7-d5 
ch, there would be neutralization of the guard 
over the Pe5, but a shutoff of the guard of 
the Pel. It Is only after Black’s self-blocking 
defenses that these neutralizing moves finally 
become converted into effective mates, 

In reviewing the changes that have taken, 
place in the two-move problems of the past 
sixty years very little has been said about the 
merit of key-moves, and yet it is often the 
key that makes or breaks the ultimate des- 
tiny of a problem* Composers become so inter- 
ested in the substance of their themes that the 
key-moves receives less attention than might 
be expected, and if a “thematic key" is found, 
one that opens one of the principal lines of 
action or the like, little thought is given to 
the question whether the key is actually a good 
one. In the present selection stress has been 
laid in most cases on the key as well as upon 
the afterplay. Some keys have proved good 
because they have to be picked out with care 
from a number of apparently equally valid 
tries, as in Nos. 1675-1678; some because they 
consist of such unexpected withdrawals of a 
major piece, as in Nos. 1629 and 16X5; some 
because they provide the Black King with 
one or more flights, as in Nos. 1630 and 1661; 
some for a striking unpin, as in No, 1679; and 
some because they surrender an apparent 
thematic position, as when in No. 16SG the 
White Queen moves out of an apparent line 
oi half-pin. 

{To be concluded) 

£ ^ # »H 

A CHALLENGE TO COMPOSERS 

Every now and then your Editor takes a few 
hours off from his other arduous duties and 
tinkers with the Chessmen, trying to make up 
a problem on a task that the books say is 
theoretically impossible. He invariably fails, 
but sometimes the pleasure that comes from 


163 


164 


The Chess Review 


Betting Chess pieces in motion is compensation 
tor the mental contortions he has to go through 
to keep them Irom bumping into one another. 
This is a brief note on such a failure, offered 
in the hope that other composers may get 
some fun out of trying to break through the 
same stone wall, 

The Grimshaw theme derives its name from 
the author of the first known version— a rough 
three-mover— published in 1850, Its ideal ex- 
pression. is in two-move form, Briefly, it con- 
sists of ‘‘mutual interference” by Black pieces 
that have different motions geometrically. The 
following is a simple example; 

(By Gr. Guidelli, Third Prize, Good Com- 
panions, Feb., 1916) 3rkt3, blp5, 8, 5RR1, 
4k£p # 6pl, KQ4rq, 3SS2B, Mate In two by 
1 RC1 + 

Here the "Grimshaw” occurs alter the de- 
fenses 1 , ♦ * Ed4 and 1 . . * Rd4. By the 
first move, the Black Bishop interferes with 
the Black Rd8* allowing 2 Qc2 mate, and by 1 
, ■ * Rd4 this Rook in turn interferes with the 
Bishop* so that 2 Qe2 mate can be played. 
U will be observed that the defense 1 . . . 
Bf2 must be classed as an "interference” only, 
not as part of a Grimshaw, because there is 
no complementary interference of the Bishop 
by the Rg2, In other words, the interference 
is not "mutual," 

Grimshaws are most frequently illustrated 
with a Black Pawn that is placed on the second 
rank, as in the following: 

(By H. Weenink, Good Companions, Oec M 
1917) b2K4, 2p5, .3k4, 1Q6, 5P2* 1B6, 8, 8. 
Mate in two by 1 Qc4, with Grimshaw vari- 
ations after 1 . . , Bc6 and 1 . . . PcG. 
Actually, of course, the Black Pawn in such 
cases is equivalent of a Black Rook with ab- 
breviated motion, 

"Double" Grimshaws, with two sets of mu- 
tual interferences, are not uncommon. This 
is an example with a single pair of Black 
pieces: 

(By F + F + Blake, First Prize, The House, 
1898) Q7, 3b2BK, SrlpBl, lp6, !Plk1P2 T 
KtR4Ktl, 2p2kt2* 2r3ktl. Mate in two by 
1 Bf7, with Grimshaws after 1 . . , B or 
Rc6 and 1 . , . B or ReG. 

Two separate pairs can also be used, as in: 

(By Dr. E. Palkoska, First Prize, Good 
Companions* March* 1914) 3rb3, 2KI;5, 

lFRpp3* KtKG* 3kp3, BRpSQl, 8, br6. Mate 
in two by 1 Bel, with thematic variations 
after 1 ... B or Rb2 and 1 , . . B or Rd7, 

A different arrangement of the same task 
is shown in last month's No, 1643; and in 
Schiffmanfs beautiful No. 1659, 

To those interested in carrying things to 
extremes, the question may occur; Is a com- 
plete "triple" Grimshaw possible in an ortho- 
dox two-mover? So far as I have been able 
to determine, no example has yet been pro- 
duced. Yet the fact that many doublings of 
the theme manage to achieve much additional 
byplay and some ot them do not even use all 
of the major White and Black pieces leads one 
to hope that some setting can be evolved which 
will use this potential force to create a third 
pair of mutual interference variations. 

Should anyone manage a complete tripling 
of the theme* he would either have to use a 


single Black Rook and Bishop, or two Rooks 
and two Bishops. (Obviously he could not use 
three separate pairs of pieces, because this 
would bring in promoted men). 

With a single set of theme pieces, five vari- 
ations involving mutual interference have been 
achieved in; 

(By J, Hartong, Fourth prize, Good Com- 
panions, March, 1919) 2Kt5, qlpr4, 2R5, 
rlbSkpl, RB6, 2p2P2, BGQ, 3Kt2kt.K, Mate 
in two by 1 BxP, with thematic play by I 
. . , B or Rd4 p 1 ... B or Rdf?, and 1 . . . 

Be7. 

If somehow a final interference of the Bishop 
by 1 . + , He? could be attained, this would 
be a complete triple Grimshaw. But this does 
not seem possible, and Hartong’s effort must 
remain (in Alain White’s words) "a brilliant 
attempt." 

With two pairs of theme pieces, the cleverest 
attempt at a multiple Grimshaw seems to have 
been the famous "Organ Pipes" mechanism, 
originated by Sam Loyd. A classic example is: 

(By Otto Wurzburg, American Chess 
Magazine, 1898) 2brrbBl, 7Kt, 2Q5, lpR5, 
lplk2pl J 4p1 Ktl, 4K2B, 8 . Mate in two by 
1 Rcl. 

Here the Black Rooks and Bishops inter- 
ior e mutually with one another on four dif- 
ferent squares — d7, d6, e7, and eft. By verbal 
definition, this can be called a "quadruple” 
Grimshaw; but actually there are only lour 
distinct mates, and the net effect is the pro- 
duction of interferences on only four lines of 
action — c8-f5, dS-d5, e8-e4, and f8-c5 + Conse- 
quently the problem would ordinarily be classi- 
fied as a double Grimshaw, despite the recur- 
rence of the theme Interferences. A pure mul- 
tiple Grimshaw, if it can be completely 
achieved, will have three or more sets of dis- 
tinct mutual interferences leading each to 
distinct mates. 

I now offer my small contribution: a sug- 
gestion for tripling the theme by having one 
pair of Black pieces perform a double Grim- 
shaw, and another pair execute a single set of 
mutual interferences independently in another 
sector of the board: 

(By V. L. E,, original) 2 bR4, 2rlplP1, 
plKtpktp2, 3k1p2> Tp4pl, lr5Kt, IktQbSP, 
4RBBK. Mate in two by 1 P-g8 (Q or B), 
with thematic variations after 1 ... B or 
Rc3, 1 . , . B or Re3, and 1 . . * B or Rd7. 

Purists will point out that the problem is 
technically "cooked" because the key Pawn 
can become either a Queen or a Bishop, but a 
more serious defect is the fact that a pro- 
moted White piece (created by the first move) 
is required to set up the variation I . . . Rd7* 
In the brief time I have been working on the 
task, I have not been able t.o overcome this 
difficulty; but in No. 1664 I present the same 
matrix, with a double Grimshaw as the base, 
and with two interferences by a Black Knight 
occurring independently in another part of the 
board, without the use of a promoted piece. 
Can some ingenious composer finish the job 
properly? Or can the triple Grimshaw be done 
in some other way? The question is still open* 
gentlemen. 


* * * * $ 


O C XOBER, 19 4 0 


165 


No. lt>63 
Covington, K y. 

EDWARD L. DEISS 



Mate in 2 


No. im 
V. L, EATON 
Washington, D, C, 



Mate in 2 


No. 1665 

NICHOLAS GABOR 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



Mate in 2 


Original Section 

No. 1666 
F, GAM AGE 


Brockton, Mass. 



Mate in 2 


No. 166? 

B, M. MARSHALL 


Shreveport, La, 


®*f* B 

8 ! 

ill i 

1 Hi 


■: : L S.J J fewife-S + ¥ + + * 

i® ■ ^ 


Mate in £ 


No. 1668 

GEOFFREY MOTT-SMITH 
New York, N. Y. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1669 

FRED SPRENGER 
New York, N, Y t 



Mate in 2 


No, 1670 
M, EDELSTEIN 
Somerville, Mass. 

In Memoriam: John F. Barry ' 



Mate in 3 


No- 1671 
H, C. MOWRY 
Malden, Mass, 



Mate in 3 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE NOVEMBER 15th, 1940 
















166 


The Chess Review 


Original Section (cont'd) 


No, 1672 

H. C. MOWRY 
Malden, Mass- 



Mate in 3 


No, 1675 (G) 

E, G, SCHULLER 

First Prize, Brisbane 
Courier, 1928, 



Mate in 2 


No. 167S (G) 

A, MARI 

First Prize, Bristol 
Times and Mirror, 1930, 



Mate in 2 


No, 1673 

FRED SPRENGER 
New York, N, Y, 


No. 1676 (G) 

V, L, EATON 

First Prize, Cleveiand- 
Cincinnati Solving Match, 1934, 


No; 1679 4a W) 

F. GAMAGE 
Honorable Mention, 

North American Tourney, 193S + 



No. 1674 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N, Y, 



Mate in 4 


No. 1677 CM) 

A r ELLER MAN 

Bristol Times and 
Mirror, 1928. 



Mate in 2 


No, 1.680 (W) 

, PI M EN OFF and E. UMNGFF 

First Prize, Western 
Morning News, 1930, 



Mate in 2 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE NOVEMBER 16th, 1940 

















October, 1940 


No* 1681 (W) 

K. A. K. LARSEN 

First Prize, Tijdsefrrift 
v. d* N. Scbaakbond, 1930- 



Mate in 2 


No, 1682 (G) 

S. S. LEWMANN 
P ir s t ' P r iz e , M agyar 
Sakkvilag, 1936. 



Mate in 2 


No, 1683 (G) 
M. M. BARULIN 

First Prize, II 
Problem a, 1933. 



Mate in 2 


THESE PROBLEMS 


\. V 

Quoted Section 


No. 1684 (-G) 

M* J. ADABASCHE FF 
Second Prize, "64/' 1934, 



Mate in 2 


No. 1685 (Gr, W) 

M „ SEGERS 

First Prize, Munkasakk, 1934. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1686 (W) 

DR. G. PAROS 

First Prize, Magyar 
Sakkvilag, 1935; 



Mate in 2 

ARE NOT SCORED ON TH 



No. 1687 (M) 

0. STOCCHE 


(Circa 1936). 



Mate in 2 


No, 1688 (W) 

S. JONNSON 

First Prize, Vart 
Hem, 1938, 



Mate in 2 


No. 1689 (G) 

R, BUCHNER 

First Prize, De 
Maasbode, 1938, 




m a m m m 

m m m 

§§ §§■•■. b 

§gfl 




Mate in 2 


SOLVERS' LADDER 


















168 


T h ii Chess 


Rev i e w 


SOLUTIONS 

(Maximum score for Nos. 1618-1635: 36 Two 
points for correct solution to each problem.) 

No + 1618: 1 Qa7* No, 1619; 1 Sb7. No. 1620; 
1 Bh3. No, 1621: 1 B15. No. ;1G22: 1 RhT. No* 
1623: 1 Ite2-c2. No. 1624: I Qh5. No, 1625: 
1 Rcl-c7. No. 1626: 1 Ke5. No. 1627: 1 SdL 
No. 1628: 1 Rg7-g5. No. 1629: 1 Rh4. No. 
1630: 1 Kd6. No, 1631: 1 Be4. No. 1632: 1 
Se4. No, 1633: 1 Bc7. No. 1634: 1 Ba6. No. 
1635: 1 Qe7, 

Solvers have been unanimous in praise of 
Mr. White's articles. Many interesting; com- 
ments have been received, and if space per- 
mits we shall publish some of them in our next 
issue* 

He $ ft $ 

INFORMAL LADDER 

*W. Patz 931, 34; L* Rothenberg 906, 

36; *J, Harmus 824, 32; A, Tauber 768, 36; G. 
Fairley 753, 36; K. Lay 639, 26; A. A. J. Grant 
605, 36; J. M. Dermison 602, 28; *1. Burstein 
628; * a * * D r. G« Dobbs 599; Dr. M, Herzberger 
542; B, M. Marshall 494, 36; P* A. Swart 491 T 
24 ; B. Daly 468, 36; Dr. W, A. Sheldon 

423; *Dr. P. G, Keeney 352, 36: ^E. Korpanty 
346, 36; R. Neff 336, 34; Plowman 323, 

36; J. Donaldson 306, 30; !, Sapir 328; G. E + 
Winn berg 246, 34; Rivise 262, 36; B. L. 

Fader 227, 34; W. C. Dod 206, 36; E. Popper 
239; **A, Sheftel 190, 32; S. P. Shepard 211; 
A. Fortier 197; A. B, Hodges 162; T. Lund- 
berg 129, 3£; J. Hudson 138; C, Lawrence 88, 
36; J. Dubin 85, 34; A. Gibbs 117; M. Edelstein 
and T. F, Burke 45, 36; G. Du Beau 16, 32; W. 
R. Ellis 36; J. F. Meyer 36 (Welcome!) R, W, 
Hays 35; F. Grote 28; Bill Clubb 19, 8; *T. 
McKenna 26; T. L. Goddard 24; L Hart 15; 
*W. O. Jens — % 

Congratulations to Tom McKenna, whose 
miniature four mover (No. 1614) was judged 
the best long-range problem of the quarter, and 
to W. Pat&, who tops the Ladder this month. 



PHILIP WOLISTON 


VENTNOR CITY 1940 

Here is the recipient of the best played gan/e 
prize. 

KING'S GAMBIT DECLINED (in effect) 

P* Woliston M. Hanauer 


White Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

18 B-Q2 

QR-Q1 

2 

B-B4 

KLKB3 

19 QR-Q1 

QxKP 

3 

P-Q3 

B.B4 

20 B-K3 

P-QB3 

4 

K t-Q B3 

Kt-B3 

21 QR-K1 

P-Kt3 

5 

P-B4 

P-Q3 

22 B-R6 

KR-K1 

6 

Kt-B3 

0-0 

23 R-K2 

H-Q2 

7 

Kt-Q R4 

B-Kt5 

24 QR-KB2 

KLQ1 

8 

KtxB 

PxKt 

25 R-K2 

KLK3 

9 

P-KR3 

BxKt 

26 P-R3 

KR-Q1 

10 

QxB 

Kt-Q 5 

27 QR-KB2 

R-K1 

11 

Q-B2 

P-QKt4 

28 P-KR4 

R (1 )-K2 

12 

PxP 

KtxKP 

29 B-K3 

R-K1 

13 

PxKt 

PxB 

30 B-R6 

R (1 )-K2 

14 

0-0 

Q-K2 

31 B-K3 

R-K1 

15 

P-B3 

Kt-K3 

32 P-QKt4 

PxP 

16 

Q-K2 

Q-R5 

33 RPxP 

Q-Kt6 - 

17 

QxP 

Q-Kt6 

34 QxP 

R (1 )-Q1 



Hanauer 





Woliston 


35 R-B3 

QxP 

51 RxP 

P-R4 

36 RxP 

RxR 

52 R-R7 

R-Kt4ch 

37 QxKt 

Q-K2 

53 K-B6 

K-K4 

38 QxQ 

RxQ 

54 R-Q7 

P-R5 

39 B-Kt5 R(1)-K1 

55 R-Q5ch 

K-B5 

40 BxR 

RxB 

56 R-Q1 

P-R6 

41 R-R1 

R-QB2 

57 P-Kt5 

P-R7 

42 R-R3 

K-B£ 

58 R-KR1 

R-Kt7 

43 K-B2 

K-K3 

59 P-Kt6 

R-Kt7 

44 K-K3 

K-K4 

GO P-Kt7 

K-Kt6 

45 R-R5ch 

K-K3 

61 K-B7 

P-Kt4 

46 K-Q4 

R-Q2ch 

62 P-Kt8(Q) 

RxQ 

47 R-Q5 

R-KB2 

63 KxR 

P-Kt5 

48 P-B4 

R-B7 

64 P-K5 

K-B5 

49 R-QR5 

R-Q7ch 

65 RxP 

Resigns 

50 K-B5 

RxP 



Played 

by Correspondence, 1940 

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 


Amateu r 

Miss E. Saunders 

White 


Black 


1 P-Q4 

P-Q4 

7 0-0 

Kt-K5 

2 Kt-KB3 

P-K3 

8 B-Q2 

Kt-Q2 

3 P-K3 

B-Q3 

9 R-B1 

P-KKt4 

4 B-Q3 

P-KB4 

10 Kt-KI 

P-Kt5 

5 P-B4 

P-B3 

11 P-B3? 

BxPchl 

6 Kt-B3 

Kt-B3 

Resigns 





•X. • 






REVIE 


HONOR PRIZE PROBLEM 

DR* G. DOBBS 
Carrollton, Ga, 








3c2E3 




V 




WHITE MATES IN TWO MOVES 


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CHESS 

REVIEW 


I. A, Horowitz 
I. K ASH DAN 
Editors 


Vol. VIII, No: 8 Published Monthly November, 1940 


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Chess Tourists 

The best news of the month, to us, is that 
L A. Horowitz is ready to resume his chess 
activities. Since his siege in the hospital at 
Carroll, Iowa, after the accident last February, 
he has concentrated on a thorough recuperation, 
missing the United States championship tour- 
nament and other events in which normally 
his presence would have been felt. 

Like the baseball player who, after a bean- 
mg, strives to return to action at the earliest 
moment, to avoid any appearance of bat- 
shyness, Horowitz has been eager to enter 
the playing arena, but his friends have urged 
caution until his recovery could be pronounced 
complete. 

Which leads up to our announcement. On 
or about January 1, Horowitz expects to em- 
bark upon probably his longest tour through 
the United States, Canada and Mexico. Sev- 
eral clubs at which he and Morton were to 
have appeared have already reengaged him, 
Other dubs wishing to secure his services for 
simultaneous exhibitions, lectures, consultation 
games, etc,, are urged to write to him in care 
of The Chess Review . Watch our December 
issue for details concerning the route and dates 
of his itinerary. 

FINE PERFORMANCE 

Reuben Fine, after his splendid victory in 
the Open Tournament of the U. S, C F. at 
Dallas, moved West to begin a quick circle 
of exhibition stops. He had remarkable suc- 
cess, losing only 5 of a total of 274 simul- 
taneous battles. In addition he found time to 
compete in two tournaments, at Salt Lake City 
and Hollywood, winning each handily. Details 
of his tour follow: 


W L D 

Denver, Colo, (blindfold) .... 4 1 I 

Sacramento, Calif. 13 0 1 

San Francisco, Calif 18 0 3 

Carmel, Calif 23 0 1 

Los Angeles, Calif, . . . 29 0 3 

Hollywood, Calif ,14 0 4 

Santa Barbara, Calif 15 1 1 

Albuquerque, N. Mex. 11 0 1 

San Antonio, Tex. 19 0 2 

Baton Rouge, La .12 0 0 

Springfield, Mo 20 0 0 

Omaha, Neb , , 16 0 1 

Sioux City, la 13 1 0 

Winnipeg, Man ... 29 1 2 

Minneapolis, Minn, . 13 1 o 


249 5 20 


George Koltanowski, no mean tourist him- 
self, has been active in Eastern chess circles, 
mixing blindfold play, at which he is the ultra- 
specialist, with the more usual group simul- 
taneous displays. Results of his recent stops 
are: 



w 

L 

D 

Hazleton, Pan 

13 

1 

2 

Hazleton, Pa. (blindfold) ..... 

4 

0 

0 

Boston, Mass. 

15 

7 

5 

Boston, Mass, (dock games) . 

3 

1 

1 

Wellesley, Mass, (blindfold) . . . 

6 

0 

4 

Portland, Me 

11 

1 

I 

Portland, Me. (blindfold) 

3 

0 

0 

Wilmington, Del 

15 

1 

4 


louring is going on in the European chess 
world as well, though not always voluntarily. 
We are living in times when a man can move 
from Austria to Germany, or from Romania 
to Hungary to Russia, while standing perfectly 
still! 


170 


The Chess Review 


Utah State Tourney 

The fourth annual Congress of the Utah 
Chess Federation assumed unusual importance 
through the presence in the title competition 
of Reuben Fine, The noted internationalist 
stopped over for the Labor Day week end, and 
emerged with the title of Utah chess champion 
to add to his long string of laurels. 

Five of the outstanding Utah players par- 
ticipated, including Richards Durham, cham- 
pion in 1938 and 1939, L. N, Page, 1937 
title-holder, and Dale L. Morgan, champion 
of Salt Lake City. Douglas Graham of Boze- 
man and George F. Girard of Pocatello were 
also in the main event. In the words of Mr, 
Morgan, who sends us the report: 

“Mr, Fine packed too many gun a lor the 
Utah players in their first competition against 
a grandmaster, and won easily; Durham and 
Morgan won all their other games except 
against each other to wind up in a tie for 
State honors, but Morgan won in a special 
playoff. In the master event, Fine’s most 
spectacular game, involving a double rook sac- 
rifice, was against Morgan, who got into a 
hopeless position, and when Fine offered the 
first sacrifice, accepted, I a die gloriously rather 
than dismally. 

"The major town ament was won by 14 year 
old Philip Neff of Salt Lake City in his first 
important tourney competition, Leon Fonnes- 
beck of Logan taking second. The minor 
event went to Edward F, Pederson of Woods 
Cross, Gunnar Newman of Kaysville carrying 
off second place, 

“Team play in the annual Utah Chess Fed- 
eration team tournament will start, in the late 
autumn, with Provo expected to enter a squad 
to play against Ogden, Logan and Salt Lake, 
which have comprised the league during the 
past three years/' 

STATE TITLE TOURNAMENT 




J-n 


* 

ifi 

4-1 



o 

■37 

•re 

A 



£ 

w 

>A 

Q 

w 

PL: 

R* 

Fine 

7 

O 

0 

7 — U 

D. 

Morgan — 

5 

1 

1 

— 1 

R* 

Durham 

5 

1 

1 


I, 

W. Taylor „ 

4 

3 

0 

4 -^3 

D, 

Graham 

3 

4 

0 

3 4 

L. 

N. Page 

3 

5 

0 

3 5 

H. 

Davis 

1 

6 

0 

1 6 

G. 

F, Girard 

0 

7 

0 

0 —7 


VENTNOR TOURNAMENT BOOK 

A hook of the 1940 Ven trior City Invitation 
Tournament is in preparation, and will soon be 
ready. It will contain complete scores of the 
6f> games played, all of them annotated by 
participants in the tournament. The price 
will he $1*25, but the publisher, Roy Dessauer 
of Ventnor City, informs us that advance sub- 
scription orders will be accepted at $1.00 per 
copy. 


BOSTON BUSY 

With six teams in the “A >p and seven in the 
“B” section, the Metropolitan League of Boston 
has begun its annual series. In the major 
division are: Lynn Chess Club, Bay State, 
Boylston (Y. M. C. Union), Harvard Univer- 
sity, Boston City Club, and City Club Indepen- 
dents. In the “B" section are: Lynn, Harvard 
Club, Harvard University, Boylston, Cambridge 
Y.M.C.A,, Commonwealth, and Wells Memorial. 

“Sammy” Reshevsky visited Boston recently, 
playing 30 games simultaneously at Dorchester 
Manor, winning 28 and allowing only two 
draws, which were achieved by two of the 
talented younger players of the Boylston Club, 
Fliegel and Jaffee. 


ENGLISH OPENING 


D. L. Morgan 

White 


R. Fine 

Black 


1 

P-QB4 

P-QB4 

15 

B-B3 

Kt(Kt)-B3 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-KB3 

16 

Kt-B4 

KR-Q1 

3 

P-KKt3 

P-Q4 

17 

Q-Kt2 

B-Q4 

4 

PxP 

KtxP 

18 

KtxKt 

KPxKt 

5 

B-Kt2 

Kt-QB3 

19 

B-Q2 

R-K1 

6 

0-0 

P-K4 

20 

R B2 

BxB 

7 

P-Q3 

B-K2 

21 

KxB 

P-Q Kt4 

a 

QKt-Q2 

0-0 

22 

Kt-R3 

P-QR3 

9 

Kt- B4 

P-B3 

23 

B-B4 

B-B1 

10 

P-Kt3 

B-K3 

24 

R-K1 

Kt-Kt5 

11 

B-Kt2 

Q-Q2 

25 

QR-B1 

Kt-Q4 

12 

Q-Q2 

QR-B1 

26 

B-Q2 

R-K4 

13 

QR-B1 

Kt-Qb 

27 

R-B2 

QR-K1 

14 

Kt-K3 

Kt-Kt5 

28 

B-B1 

R-R4 

After all t he manoevering, 

White’s 

forces are 

way offside, 

and his King is left pretty much 

to 

his own 

resources. 

Fine takes 

ad van tage 

by some pretty give-away tactics. 

29 

P-R4 

RxRPI 

33 

BxR 

KtxB 

30 

PxR 

Q-Kt5eh 

34 

PxKt 

Q-Kt6ch 

31 

K B1 

Q-R6ch 


Resigns 


32 

K-Ktl 

R-K6! 





MISSOURI CHAMPIONSHIP 

Upon his return from the Dallas Tourna- 
ment, Erich Marchand participated in the first 
annual Missouri State Championship and won 
first prize. He was followed closely by H, M, 
Wesenberg, Wilson Reilly and W. E T Campbell, 
all of Kansas City. 

Mr. Marchand writes us that “Missouri play- 
ers are attempting to work out. a system where- 
by each locality will hold preliminaries so 
that the expense of a. large number of repre- 
sentatives at. the final tournament will be 
avoided* In the preliminary tourneys, entry 
fees will he used to help the representatives 
go to the state finals/* 

This seems to us a very sensible arrange- 
ment, and should he copied in other states; it 
will undoubtedly he a great influence for stimu- 
lating increased participation and closer or- 
ganizational ties. 


Correspondence Chess Tournament 


Many of our readers, from time to time, 
have urged us to sponsor a correspondence 
chess tournament- Interest in that field has 
been soaring to the stage of a boom, as evi- 
denced by the reports of several active and 
enterprising organizations catering to the play- 
by-mail fiends. 

In recognition of this situation, and in the 
belief that our subscribers will welcome the 
service, we are commencing a regular corres- 
pondence chess department. In it we shall 
have news of various competitions, lists of 
entries and results, and a fair selection of the 
best games played. 

Our first tournament will be open to all. 
Entries may be sent in at any time. Players 
will be divided into sections of five. Each 
section will contest a double round- robin, every 
entrant playing two games with every other, 
or eight games all told. 

The entrance fee is 31.00 per section. 
Players may enter as many sections as they 
choose, and will have different sets of oppon- 
ents in each section. It is not necessary to 
subscribe to The Chess Review. However, as 
a special inducement, we are offering one free 
entry to all new subscribers to the magazine. 
This offer also applies to our present sub- 
scribers on their next renewal date. 

The prizes in each section will be orders 
on The Chess Review, $4-00 for first prize 
and $2.00 for second. These orders may be 
applied towards the payment of subscriptions, 
or towards the purchase of books or merchan- 
dise advertised by us, at current rates. 

Complete scores of all games must be sub- 
mitted to us by the winners, in order to obtain 
credit. In case of a draw, the player of the 
White pieces is responsible for sending the 
score of the game. It is advisable that scores 
be signed by both players, to avoid any dis- 
pute. 

The rules of correspondence chess are simple 
enough. Replies must be sent within 48 hours 
of the receipt of a move. A total of 10 ad- 
ditional days is allowed during the course of 
a game, for any contingencies that may arise. 
Undue delay may lead to forfeiture. 

Moves should be written carefully, to avoid 
error or ambiguity. As an example, if B-B4 
is sent, in a position where either Bishop 
could move to that square, the opponent can 
select whichever move he prefers. We suggest 


that players always send the previous move, 
as well as their reply, on each card. 

Any questions or disputes regarding the 
rules or conduct of play are to be submitted to 
us. Our adjudication must be accepted as 
final. 

Correspondence chess has given entertain- 
ment to generations of chess players. Its de- 
votees claim there is nothing like it for stimu- 
lating interest in the game. It is an excellent 
method for improving one's knowledge of 
chess, as the incentive is created to do the 
requisite study and thorough analysis required 
to meet the experts in this field on an equal 
basis. 

Eor the player who has little opportunity 
for good competition over the board, or who 
can find no opponent in his vicinity, corres- 
pondence games are a welcome outlet. If it 
takes several days for a move, and several 
months for a game, there is an even greater 
satisfaction in the execution of a well-planned 
strategem. Success must he earned on a sound 
basis, since there is little hope that the op- 
ponent will make a gross oversight, or that 
he will fall for a shallow trap that might serve 
in over-the-board play. 

Eldorous Dayton of New Rochelle, who has 
long been interested in correspondence chess, 
sends us a number of the finest games played 
in this country- Two of them are appended, 
with his notes. 


SICILIAN 

(Notes by 

J. W, Brurmemer 
White 

1 P-K4 P-QB4 

2 Kt-KB3 Kt-QB3 

3 P*Q4 PxP 

4 KtxP Kt-B3 

9 B-B3 

Igel-BeuBmi, Vienna 
P-QT 

10 Q-Q3 


DEFENSE 

13. Dayton) 

W. H* Failing 

Black 

5 Kt-QB3 P-K3 

6 B-K2 B-K15 

7 0-0 BxKt 

8 PxB KtxP 

,KtxQBP 

1928, continued 9 , . . 


Kt.Q4 


Krause-Norling continued 10 * . . KtxP, but 
Black's hara-kiri is already patent* What fol- 
lows is a post-mortem executed with surgical 
precision. 

11 BxKt PxB 

12 R-KIch K-B1 

13 Kt-B5 P.Q3 


171 


172 


The Chess Review 


Failing 



Brunnemer 


14 KtxKtPl .... 

To say this must have been startling is an 
understatement 

14 .... . Kt- K4 

Natural enough, If 14 . . , KxKt; 15 Q-Kt3 
eh. 

15 Kt-R5I ! 

An old friend in new Easter clothes! If 
IS . . . KtxQ; 16 B-RGch, K-Ktl ; 17 R-KSchl ? 
and IS Kt-B6 mate. 

15 , , . . B-K3 

16 RxKt! PxR 

17 B-R3ch .... 

Monseigneur finds the fatal focus, 

17 ... . K-K1 

IS Q-Kt5ch Resigns 

For if 18 ... . B“Q2; 19 Kt-Kt7 mate, or IS 
. . . Q Q2; 19 Kt-BGch. 


DANISH GAMBIT 


(Notes by E. Dayton) 


Dr. R. S, 

. Davis 


P. J. Walker 

White 



Black 


1 P-K4 

P-K4 

5 

B-Q B4 

Kt-B3 

2 P-Q4 

PxP 

6 

Kt-B3 

B-Kt5 

3 P-QB3 

PxP 

7 

0-0 

BxKt 

4 KtxP 

Kt-QB3 

8 

PxB 

P-Q3 

9 P-K5 


# * V ■ 


The move 

Alekhine 

did 

not make 

against 

Is&akoff. Dr. 

Davis and 

[ I have used the van- 


at ion with uniform success, 

9 . , . * PxP 

10 Q-Kt3 0-0 

11 Kt-Kt5! .... 

The sharpest continuation. 

11 ... . Q-K1 

Better than Kt-QRL A game Daylon-Gibbs 
continued 11 . . . Kt-QR4; 12 BxPch, K-R1 ; 
13 Q-Kt5, P-KR3; 14 QxKL. PxKi; 15 B- 
KtS* KLQ2; 16 P-KB4 ! P-QIU3; 17 Q-Q5, 

R-QKtl; 13 B'R3 > R-Kl; 19 Q-B7, Kt-B3; 20 
PxKtP, Kt-R2 ; 21 QRQL, Resigns. 

12 B-R3 Kt-QR4 


13 Q*Kt4 P-QKt3 ! 

Neat! If now 14 QxReh, QxQ; 15 BxQ, 
KtxB! and Black, wins two pieces for a Rook. 

14 B-Q3! .... 

White swiftly switches to the vulnerable 
K side. 


14 ... , P-B4 

15 Q-KR4 P-Kt3 


If P-KR3; 1G Kt-K4 ! 

16 Q-R6 

17 B-K41 

18 PhKB4E 

19 PxP ! 

20 R-B3 1 


wins the exchange. 

Q-R5 

B-Kt2 

BxB 

Q-B7 


Not 20 R-B2? QxReh! 21 KxQ p Kt-KtSeh. 
20 ... . BxR 


It seems as if Black can now force perpetual 
check. 


21 PxB KR-Q1 

22 PxKt R-Q8ch 

23 RxR QxReh 

24 K-Kt2 3 .... 

The pattern of the King moves must be 
just so to escape perpetual check, 

24 . . . , Q-K7ch 

25 K-R3! Resigns 

Black runs out oT checks. If 25 ... Q- 
B8ch ; 2G K-Kt3! Q-K8eh; 27 K-K14. Q-KtSch ; 
28 K-B4 ! 


PUT NEW MEANING AND 
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THE CHESS REVIEW 

25 West 43rd Street : New York, N. Y, 



NOVJEMB 3j r , 19 4 0 


173 


Correspondence Star 

Several of the greatest masters owe their 
start to correspondence play. Paul Keres of 
Estonia is an outstanding example. He first 
appeared in international chess play at the 
Team Tournament at Prague in 1935. As a 
lad of nineteen, he was leader of the Estonian 
forces, and compiled one of the best scores 
in the competition. Shortly thereafter he com- 
menced a series of impressive victories in 
tournaments, climaxed by his successes at 
Margate, 1937 and 1939, Semmering, 1937, 
and AvrOj 1938. 

When players began to look up Keros' 
record, to attempt to trace the source of his 
genius, they found dozens of games he had 
played by mail, which exhibited the flair 
for combination and uncanny resource which 
has marked his play, 


Here is an example from a correspondence 
tournament played in 1934. 

MGLLER ATTACK 


P. Keres 
White 


F. Sachsenmaier 
Black 


1 P-K4 

2 Kt-K R3 

3 B-B4 

4 P-B3 

9 


P-K4 
Kt QB3 
B-B4 
Kt-B3 

P-Q5 [ 


5 P-Q4 

6 PxP 

7 Kt-B3 

8 0-0 


PxP 

ELKtSch 

KtxKP 

BxKt 


The sparkling M oiler Attack. The continu- 
ation in the game is considered the best play 
I’or both sides. 


9 

10 R-K 1 

11 RxKt 

12 B-K Kt5 


B-B3 

Kt-K£ 

P-Q3 

BxB 


13 KtxB 

14 KtxRPJ 

15 R-R4ch 

16 Q- R5 


0-0 
KxKt 
K-Ktl 
P-K B4 


17 R-K 1 


In later games Keres experimented with 17 
R-K3, t.o avoid the defense , . . Kt-Kt3. But 
Black can still equalize with 17 . . , P-B5! IS 
P-KKt4, PxP e.p. ; 19 Q-R7ch, K-BS; 20 Q-R5 
eh, K-Ktl b and White must take perpetual 
check. 

17 ... . Kt-Kt3 3 

IS R-R3 R-B3 

19 Q-R7C h K-B2 

20 R K6J P-B3? 

This gives White too many chances. Best 
was 20 . . . RxR ; 21 PxEch, RxP f 22 RxRch, 
KxB; 23 QxKtch, Q-B3, with a probable draw. 

21 KR-K3 B-Q2' 

And here better was 21 . . . PxP; £2 R-K8 P 
QxR, though White obtains a lasting attack 
alter 23 RxQ, KxR; 24 BxP. 

22 RxRch KxR 25 QxP PxP 

23 R K Kt3 B-K1 26 BxP Q-B1 

24 Q-R5 K-K2 27 Q-Kt5ch K-Q2 



PAUL KERBS 


23 R-QB3 .... 

Beginning the final attack. Black is given 
no chance to draw a free breath. 


Sachsenmaier 



Keres 


28 ... . Q-Ktl 

29 R-QKt3J P-Kt3 

30 R-K3 [ 

The exchange will wait. White’s threats are 
too numerous Lo parry. 


30 > . . . P.R4 

31 Q-B5ch Resigns 

After 31 . > . K-B2; 32 Q-B2ch. K-Ql; 33 
RxBch! KxR; 34 QxKtch, K-Ql ; 35 Q-KtSch, 
K-B1 ; 36 Q.xP, with an easy win. It 35 . . . 
K-Kl; 36 R-Bf>ch, K-B2; 37 Q-R5ch, K-K2; 
38 Q Klctli wins the Rook, or 37 . . . K-Ktl ; 
38 B-Q5ch and mate next move. 






Backwash from Buenos Aires 


The American team which did not go to 
Buenos Aires in the Summer of 1939 missed 
not only the team tournament, but also a meet- 
ing of the Federation International des Echecs, 
which apparently produced some stormy de- 
velopments. The following letter is self-ex- 
planatory. 

Dear Mr, Sturgis: 

Relative to the matter oi' the F. L D. E, 
which you instructed be laid before the Judi- 
ciary Committee, the undersigned as members 
of such Committee report as follows: 

A Congress of the F. I. D. E. was called for 
September 13, 1939, at Buenos Aires, Argen- 
tina, An agenda of the business to be trans- 
acted at such Congress had been submitted in 
advance by Dr. A. Rueb, the President of the 
Ft I. D. EL inasmuch as he could not be in 
personal attendance, Such agenda made no 
provision for an election of officers, and under 
the existing circumstances there was no oc- 
casion for an election, as the terms of the 
acting officers would not expire until 1941, 
Notwithstanding that no election of officers 
was scheduled to be held and that there were 
no offices to be filled, the delegates in at- 
tendance at the Buenos Aires Congress pro- 
ceeded to hold an election oi officers, They 
thereupon elected SCnor Auguste deMuro as 
President, Mr, M. S. Kuhns as Vice-President, 
and Senor Joaquin Gomez Masia as Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

The United Stales of America was not 
represented at such Congress, having no dele- 
gates in attendance, although Miss May Karff 
of Boston, Mass, was there in the capacity of 
a contestant in the Women’s Tournament 
which was held in conjunction with the In- 
ter national Team Tournament. Miss Karff, 
however, was in no sense a representative of 
the United States unit of the F. I. D. E, with 
respect to the business of the Congress, her cred- 
entials being expressly limited to the status 
or Woman Champion of the United States. 
So far as is known, Miss Karff made no at- 
tempt to assume any authority io act as a 
delegate on behalf of the United Slates unit 
or to take part in the business of the Con- 
gress, and in the absence of any evidence to 
the contrary, the Judiciary Committee is as- 
suming that Miss Karff did not act or attempt 
to act in any official capacity other than as an 
entrant in the Women's Tournament, 

A written report which was later circulated 
by the deMuro administration stated, however, 
that the United States had participated in the 
business of the Congress, including the elec- 
tion of officers. 

The first information received by M. S. 
Kuhns, the Vice-President of the F. I, l), E. and 
the President of the National Chess Federa- 
tion, was a letter from Senor deMuro stating 
that he had been elected as President of the 
F. I. D. E. Mr. Kuhns thereupon wrote a 
congratulatory letter to Senor deMuro stating 

174 


that he had not known an election was to have 
been held and that he assumed that Dr. Rueb 
had overlooked writing him about it. Mr. 
Kuhns was later informed by Dr, Rueb that 
the election had not been authorized and that 
he, Dr. Rueb, was still the President of the 
F, L D. E. Upon receiving this word from 
Dr, Rueb, Mr. Kuhns wrote a further letter 
to Senor deMuro disavowing his earlier letter 
of congratulation. 

The newly elected Secretary -Treasurer has 
called upon Prof. M. Nieolet, the old Secretary- 
Treasurer, to turn over the records and funds 
of F. 1. D. E, This Dr. Rueb has refused to 
permit, not recognizing the deMuro admini- 
stration as having any authority to receive 
them. The matter now stands with conflicting 
claims of authority between the old admini- 
stration, whose terms of office will not expire 
for another year and the deMuro administra- 
tion who were elected at the Buenos Aires 
Congress. 

An official printed report of the business 
transacted at the various sessions of the 
Buenos Aires Congress has been published 
by Dr. Rueb over his signature and in his 
capacity as President. In such report no 
mention is made of any election and the old 
officers still appear. 

Mr, Kuhns has made a request that the 
United States Chess Federation be designated 
as the United S tales unit of the F. I. D. E. 
in accordance with the instructions given to 
him pursuant to Article 4 of the Agreement of 
Consolidation of September 5, 1939, The ne- 
cessary change has been made and the United 
States Chess Federation is now recognized 
as the official United Slates unit by both the 
Rueb and the deMuro administrations, both 
of whom incidentally have requested payment 
of dues from the U. S. C, F. 

A factual situation which must be recognized 
irrespective of the question of who are the 
legal officers ofF.I.D.E. is that that organization 
is a decimated body. Many of the strongest 
and most active units are no longer indepen- 
dent nations by reason of the war. 

All of the facts hereinabove set forth are 
substantiated by documents in the possession 
of Mr. M. S. Kuhns, who stands ready to turn 
them over to you or Mr, 01 fe when you come 
here. 

Without expressing any opinion as to which 
set of officers are entitled to be legally recog- 
nized, it is the opinion of your Judiciary 
Committee: 

1. That the entire question of action by the 
United States Chess Federation with re- 
spect to F. I. D. E, be held in abeyance; 

2. That until the affairs of F. I, D. E. are de- 
termined, no dues be paid by the United 
States Chess Federation to either Treas- 
ure i\ 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELBERT A. WAGNER, JR. 

M, S, KUHNS 


November, 19 4 0 


175 


Selected Games 

Annotations, unless otherwise credited, are 
hy l. Kashdan . 


QUEEN’S GAMBIT DECLINED 


M, Luckis 

White 


1 

P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

2 

P-QB4 

P*K3 

3 

Kt*QB3 

P-Q4 

4 

Kt B3 

B-K2 

5 

B-Kt5 

QKt-Q2 

6 

P-K3 

0-0 


I. Raud 

Black 


7 

R*B1 

P-B3 

8 

B.Q3 

P-QR3 

9 

PxP 

KPxP 

10 

Q-B2 

R-K1 

11 

0*0 

Kt*B1 

12 

Kt*K5 

BliP 


This allows Black to free his game by a 
favorable exchange. In this variation White's 
basic play is on the Q side. Plans to be con- 
sidered are 12 R-Ktl, with P-QKt4, P-QR4 and 
P Kt5 as objective, or 12 P-QR3, followed by 
P-QKM, Kt-QR4 and KI.-B5. 


24 PxKt 


There is no choice. If 24 K-Rl, Q-B7 ! 25 PxKt 
(Kt-KtS allows a smothered mate by Q-Kt8ch! 
25 RxQ, Kl-B7) t R-Kt3 ; 26 Kt-Kt3, BxPch; 27 
BxB, QxQ, winning easily, 

24 ... . R-Kt3ch 27 K-Bl QxRPch 

25 Kt-Kt3 RxKtchl 28 K-Ktl Q-Kt6ch 

25 PxR QxPch 29 K-B1 Q-R71 

Not 29 . . , B-B4 ; 3ft B-Q1, and White es- 
capes. Now the threat is B-B4 or BxP, as 
well as R-K3, 


30 PxB 

31 Q-Q1 

32 R-B2 

Stronger than 32 . . 
ch?? 34 QxR! and Whi 

33 K-Ktl 

34 B-Kt4 

35 QxR 

36 R-Kt2 

The preponderance 


R-K3 

PxP 

Q*R6ch 

. R-R3ch ; 33 B-B3, RxB 
e wins. 

R-Kt3ch 

RxBch 

QxQch 

Q-B4 

or Pawns now assures 


12 

■ "i + ■ I ■■ 

Kt*Kt5 15 Kt-K2 

QR-Q1 

the Black win. 




13 BxB 

OxB 16 Kt-Kt3 

R-Q3 

37 R-Kt2 P-KR4 

41 

R-Q1 

Q-Kt6 

14 KtxKt 

BxKt 17 KR-K1 

Q-R5 

38 P-Kt5 P-84 

42 

R-Kl 

Q-Kt5 

18 

P-Kt4 .... 


39 R-KB2 Q-Kt4ch 

43 

R-Q1 

QxRP 

Now this 

is too slow. Correct was 

18 Kt- 

40 R-Kt2 Q-Q4 

44 

KR-Q2 

PxQP 

R5, BxKt; 19 BxB, R-R3; 20 P-KR3. 


45 PxRP 


¥ ¥ <9 1 


18 

* . . * R-R3 


As good as any. If 

45 

lixP. QxP; 

or 45 

19 

Kt-BI Kt-K3 


PxQP, P-K6; 46 R-Q3, 

Q-B7! am] P-K7 will 

20 

P-R4 * . , . 


win a Rook. 





Proceeding blithely, with no attention to 
the alarming accumulation of force against 
his King. £ft B-K2 was an essential precaution. 


45 . * . * P-Q6 

46 PxP Q-Kt6 

Resigns 


20 . . , . B-B63 i 

An elegant commencement of a devastating 
attack. 


Raud 



Luckis 


The play on the black squares would hare 
delighted Nimzovich! 

Buenos Aires Team Tournament 1939 

FRENCH DEFENSE 


(.Notes by Fred 

Dr, $. Tartakover 
White 


Reinfeld) 

Castillo 

Black 


1 P-K4 P-K3 4 P-K5 P-QB4 

2 P-Q4 P-Q4 5 P-QR3 B-R4 

3 Kt-QB3 B-Kt5 6 Q-Kt4 P-KKt3 

, . . K-Bl was far preferable* The weaken- 
ing of the black squares involved in the text 
may become very troublesome, especially in 
the absence of Black's KB, 


7 B-Kt5c h Kt-B3 


Thoughtless "development." As Black's QE 
is likely to be useless, 7 * . , B-Q2; 8 BxBch, 
KtxB should have been tried* 


21 B-K2 

If 21 PxB, Kt-Kt4 ; 22 B-K2 (on 22 Q*K2, 
Q-R6 wins), Kt-Rtich; 23 K-Rl, KtxPch; £4 
K-Kt2, R-Kt3ch; 25 Kt-Kt3 T Q-R6chl 26 K-Ktl 
(if 26 KxKt, QxPch; 27 K^Bl, RxKt and 
R-Kt8 mate), RxKteh! 27 PxR, QxPch; 28 
K-Bl, Kt-R6, and mate is unavoidable, 

21 ... . B-K5 

22 Q-Q2 Kt-Kt4 

23 P-B3 Kt-R6chU 

Another surprise. Black's play is as en- 

chanting as it is forceful. 


8 Kt-K2 P-R4? 11 BxKt PxB 

9 Q-B3 PxP 12 0-0 B-Kt3 

10 KtxP B-Q2 13 Q-Q3 Kt-R3 

Judging from what follows, 13 . , * Q-B2; 
14 Kt-B3, P-QB4 was better* After the text, 
Tartakover gets to work on the black squares. 

14 Kt-B3I Kf-B4 

15 B*Kt5 Q.B1 

16 B-B6 0-0 

Exposing the K to icy blasts, but . . , KR- 
Ktl is anything but attractive, 

17 P-R3! .... 




17 6 


T h e Chess Re vie \v 


In order to kick out the well posted Kt. 

17 . . , . B-Q1 

18 P-K Kt4 Kt-Kt2 

19 Q-Q2 K-R2 

Or 19 . . . Kt-Kl; 20 BxB, QxB; 21 Q-R6 
and tile threat of Kt-KKt5 is unanswerable. 
Now comes a very fine move: 


Castillo 



Ta rtakover 


20 QR-Q1II P-B4 

The chief point of White’s last move would 
have appeared in the curious variation 20 
„ , , BxB; 21 PxB, Kt-Kl; 22 Kt-K43 PxKt; 

23 Kt-KtSch, K-Ktl ; 24 KtxP(K4) and the 
miserable B is lost; or 22 . . . Q-Q1 ; 23 KI.-K5! 
with tremendous pressure. 

If Black avoids this with 20 . . , B-JC1 then 
21 BxB, QxB; 22 Kr-KtSch, K-Ktl; 23 KKt-K4 
gives a winning game. 

21 Kt-Kt5ch K-Ktl 

22 KKt-K4[ PxKt 

23 KtxP Resigns 

For If 28 KL-K1; 21 Q-R6, BxB; 25 

KtxBcli and mate in two. If 23 . . . K-R2; 

24 BxB, P-B4 forced; 25 Kt-BGch (oh, those 
black squares!), RxKt; 25 PxR and White 
now wins a piece. 

It is worth going over the play from the 
diagrammed position a second time to ap- 
preciate the power of the quiet 20 QR-Q1E! 


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12th Match Game, Moscow, 1940 
CATALAN SYSTEM 


A, Alatcrtzev 

White 


G, Levenfisch 

Black 


1 P-QB4 KLKB3 4 B-Kt2 B-K2 

2 K1-QB3 P-K3 5 P-Q4 0-0 

3 P-K Kt3 P-Q4 6 Kt-B3 QKLQ2 

7 Q-Q3 , , , < 

The Pawn need not be defended, as yet. 
After 7 O-O, PxP; 8 P-K I, White obtains a 
powerful game, Botwinnik-Dr. Lasker, Mos- 
cow 1936, continued 8 , . . P-B3; & F-QR4, P- 
QRl; 10 Q-K2, Kt-Kt3 ; 11 R-Ql, B-Kt5; 12 
Kt-K5, with advantage. 


7 

■T h + + ■ 

8 QxBP 

9 0-0 

10 Q-Kt3 

11 R-Q1 


PxP 
P-QR3 
P-Q Kt4 
B-Kt2 
P-B4! 


Now or never. He opens the Q file, but 
foresees a remarkably subtle counter-attack. 


12 PxP BxP 

13 Kt-K5 Q-Kt3 1 1 

A perfectly sound sacrifice, taking advan- 
tage of White’s momentarily exposed position. 


Levenflsch 



Alatortzev 


14 KtxKt .... 

H 14 BxB, BxPch ; 15 K-Bl, QxB; 16 KtxKt? 
Q'R8ch ; 17 KxB, Kt-Kt5 mate. Or 16 RxKt, 
Q-R£ch; 17 KxBj QxPch; 18 K El, QxKtP wins. 

14 , , , , KtxKt 

15 BxB , . . . 

If 15 RxKt, BxB, and the B cannot be cap- 
tured because of 16 * . , Q-B3ch. White would 
have to weaken his position badly against the 
threat of . . . R-B3 and , * , BxPch. Best was 
probably the dismal retreat 15 R-Rl, as the 
text loses a Pawn, 

15 ... „ BxPch 

16 K-B1 KLB4I 

The real point of the combination. 

17 Q-Kt4 KtxB 

18 Kt-K4 B-KtS 

19 K-K12 P-QR4 

20 Kt-B6ch .... 





November, l 9 4 o 


177 


Trying for complications, But the net result 
is a useful KKt hie for Black. 

20 , . . , PxKt 23 K-R3 R-KKtl 

21 Q-Kt4ch K-R1 24 Q-KR4 R-Kt3 

22 RxB Q-B3ch 25 R-B1 Kt-Q3 

The Knight reenters the fray, most effec- 
tively, 

26 B-B4 


If 26 RxP, Kt-B4 ; 27 Q-KB4, not 27 . . . 
RxR? 28 Q-K53 but 27 . . . RxPchf! 28 PxR, 
Q-R8ch; 29 K-Kt4, R-Ktlch wins. 


26 

27 Q.R5 

28 B~K3 

29 QR-B1 

30 Q-B5 


Kt K5 
P-K4 
QR-KKtl 
Q-K3ch 
KtxPi 


The final blow, after which White is quite 
helpless. 


31 QxQ 

32 PxKt 

33 K-R2 

34 R-KB2 

35 K-R1 


PxQ 36 R-R2 R(Kt)-Kt5 

RxPch 37 R-B6 RxRch 

RxB 38 KxR R-K5 

R-K5 39 R-B2 K-Kt2 


R-RSch 


R es ig n s 


Buenos Aires, 1940 
SLAV DEFENSE 


C. Guimard 


R, Grau 


White 


Black 


Grau 



Guimard 


23 ... . Q-R4 

24 Q-K3 Kt-Kt5 1 

25 R-Q1 .... 

If 25 B-B6, Kt-Q4 (but not Kt-B7? 26 Q-R6! 
wins) , 2-6 Q-R6?? QxRch; 27 K-R2, KtxB; 28 
PxKt, Q-K4cli and wins, 

£5 . . . . Kt-Q4 

26 Q-Q4 R-QB1 

27 B-B6 Q-B4 

Playing to simplify. Black would have a 
decided advantage in an endgame, owing to 
the weak White Pawns. 


1 P-Q4 

2 Kt“KB3 

3 P-B4 

4 Kt-B3 


P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

P-B3 

PxP 

-K2 


5 P-QR4 

6 P-K3 

7 BxP 

8 0-0 


B.B4 

P-K3 

B-QKt5 

0-0 

B4 


9 . . . Kt-K5, as played in several games of 
the last Alekhine-Euwe match, is accepted as 
best at this point. 10 B-Q3 sets up interesting 
complications, which were rather thoroughly 
explored in the match. 


28 Q-Q2 Q-B7 

29 Q-K1 

29 Q-R6 still would not do, for 29 , . . QxR 
ch; 30 K-R2, KtxB; 31 PxKt, Q-Q3cli and Q-BX 
defends the mate. 

29 ... * QxR P 

30 P-Kt5 Q-B7 

31 K-R2 P«Kt3 

32 R-Q4 R-B5 


10 P-K4 

Black obtains sufficient counter play after 
this. Better was 10 Kt-R2 ! B-R4; 11 PxP, 
Kt-B3 ; 12 R-Ql, Q-K2 ; 13 Kt-Q4! with ad- 
vantage, 

10 ... . B-Kt5 

11 P-K5 Kt-Q4 

12 P-R3 .... 


Destroying any illusions that White will 
again be allowed to construct a mating threat. 

i 

33 RxR QxR 36 Q-Q1 K^KI 

34 P-KKt3 P-QR4 37 B-Kt7 P-Kt4 

35 K-Ktl K-B1 38 Q-R1 P-R5 

The extra Pawn, with the WB now out of 
play, is clearly decisive, 


Sacrificing a Pawn for a promising attack- 
ing position. That it failed eventually does 
not detract from the enterprise of the idea. 


42 * , 

13 RPxB 

14 KtxB 

15 R-R3 


BxQKt 

BxQP 

PxKt 

Kt-QB3 


16 R-R3 

17 B-Q3 

18 R-K1 

19 B-Ktl 


Q-B2 
P-K Kt3 
KKt- Kt5 
P-Q6 


Returning the extra Pawn temporarily, in 
order to exchange one of the Bishops, and 
gain time for a better defensive set-up. 


20 BxP KtxB 

21 RxKt KR-Q1 

22 B-Kt5 RxR 

23 QxR . , , . 

Threatening B-E6 and Q-KR3. If 23 . . . KtxP; 
24 Q-KKtS wins a piece. Black definitely has 
to find something, and his next few moves are 
extremely well timed, 


39 

Q-K1 

P-Kt5 

40 

Q-R1 

PhR6! 

41 

PxP 

P-Kt6 

42 

P-R4 

Q-Kt5 


Resigns 



Sydney, Australia, 1940 
FRENCH DEFENSE 


L* Steiner 


C. Jr S. Purdy 


White 


Black 


1 P-K4 P-K3 

2 P-Q4 P-Q4 

3 Kt-QB3 Kt-KB3 


4 B-KKt5 B-Kt5 

5 P-K5 P-KR3 

6 B-R4 . . . . 


178 


T he Chess Review 


This has appeared frequently in Australian 
chess of late, rather than the older line, G 
B-Q2, BxKt; 7 PxB, Kt-R5; 8 Q-Kt4, etc., 
which is no longer considered favorable for 
White. 


6 

¥ ¥ ¥ 1 

P-K0<t4 

10 

P-QR3 

BxKtch 

7 

B-Kt3 

Kt-K5 

11 

KtxB 

KtxB 

8 

Kt-K2 

P-KB4 

12 

RPxKt 

Kt-B3 

9 

PxP e.p, QxP 

14 0-0-0 

13 

Q*R5ch 

KtxP 

K-K2 

Not 14 . 

. . QxBP; 15 

B-Kt5 ? to be 

followed 

by 

KR-B1, 

when Black’s 

King is too 

exposed. 

White's next move is based 
of opening the KB hie. 

on the same plan 

15 

P-B4 

B-Q2 

20 

QR-K1 

K-Q1 

16 

B-Q3 

QR-KB1 

21 

Q-K3 

P-Kt3 

17 

KR-B1 

P-B3 

22 

P-R4 

PxP 

18 

Kt-K2 

KtxKtch 

23 

RxP 

Q-Kt4 

19 

QxKt 

KR-Ktl 

24 

P-R5 

RxR? 


A., mistake, which gives White his chance. 
Essential was 24 , . . IvB2, when Black would 
have had a relatively easy game with a Pawn 
plus. 

25 PxR Q-Kt6 

26 Q-K5 .... 


Specially annotated for us by Robert Will- 
man , New York State champion , 

RUY LOPEZ 



R* Willman 


H. M. 

Phillips 


White 


Black 

1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

4 

B.R4 

Kt-B3 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

5 

Q-K2 

P-Q3 

3 

B-KtS 

P-QR3 

6 

P-83 

B-K2 


7 P Q3 

Steinit^s “slow” variation, in which White 
holds back anti avoids exchanges while build- 
ing up a powerful attack. Black should try 
to open up the game while he is still ahead 
in development. 

7 * . ♦ ♦ 0-0 10 QKt-Q 2 P-Q4 

8 P-KR3 B-Q2 11 P-K Kt4 B-KB1 

9 B-B2 R-K1 12 Kt-Bl PxP 

12- , . . P-Q5 was probably better, and would 
have left White with the problem of where to 
place his King. 

13 PxP B-K3 

14 K t- K t5 GhK£ 

15 Kt-Kt3 P-K Kt3 

■Preventing” 16 Kt-Bf>. 


Now the King is fixed in the center, and 
White can prepare at leisure for the onslaught 


Purdy 





Steiner 


26 . * * . 

27 K-Ktl 

28 R-KB1 


PxP 29 Q-Kt8cb K-K2 
R-B1 30 QxP R-KKtl 

QxKtP 31 Q-B5ch K Ki 


32 P-B51 


Q^Kt2 


K 32 . . 


33 R-Klch is fatal. There 


is no good defense to the threats initiated by 
P-R6. 


33 P-B6 Q-B2 

34 Q-Q6 B-B1 


If 34 . . . K-Qt 35 B-R6! wins. 

35 QxBRch K-Q1 

36 Q Q6ch B-Q2 

Or 36 . . . Q-Q2; 37 P*B7! What a Pawn! 

37 Q-Kt6ch Resigns 


Phillips 



Willman 


16 Kt-B5I 

This move must be played immediately, if 
at alb before Black plays either P-KR3 or P- 
QKt4. 


16 ... - BxKt 

After 16 ♦ . * PxKt an exhaustive analysis 
is almost impossible. The probable continu- 
ation would be 17 KtPxP, B Q2; IS R-KKtl, 
K-Rl (not . . . B-Kt2; 19 B-Kt3, Kt-Ql; 20 
KtxBP! KtxKt; 21 B-RGJ), 19 BK3 (threaten- 
ing B-Bo ! ) » B-Kt2; 20 QR4! If Black plays 
19 . . . Kt-Ql, or 19 . . , PTC 13; 20 B-K13, 
Kt-Ql, his game is badly tied up for a long 
time. Such attacks generally win over the 
board. 


17 

KtPxB 

B-Kt£ 

22 

P-K R4 

P-Kt4 

18 

8-K3 

Kt-Ql 

23 

B-Q5 

KtxB 

19 

0-0-0 

P-B4 

24 

RxKt 

R-B1 

20 

B-Kt3 

R-KB1 

25 

P-R5 

Kt-K3 

21 

PxP 

PxP 

26 

KtxKt 

PxKt 



November, 19 4 0 


179 


27 R(Q5) Q1 .... 

A slight Inaccuracy which loses a move ami 
might have cost an important half-point, 27 
R-Q2 should have been played. 

27 ... . P»Kt4 

28 P-R6 B-B3 

29 Q-R5 K-R2 

30 R-Q2 QR-Q1 

Black has defended himself very well up 
to this point but errs now by making too 
obvious a move in a simple position. After 
30 . . . P-155 ; 31 KR-Q1, QR-Q1, White would 
be unable to win, e. g,, 32 RxR. RxR; 33 RxR, 
QxR; 34 Q-RTcb, KxP; 35 Qxlt K-Kt3; 3(j 
QxRP, Q-Q61 with perpetual check. 


31 

RxR 

RxR 

40 

BXP 

KxP 

32 

BxBP 1 

OKI 

41 

K-Q2 

K-B6 

33 

QxQ 

RxQ 

42 

K-Q3 

B-B4 

34 

R-Q1 

R“Q1 

43 

B-B7 

B-K2 

35 

RxR 

BxR 

44 

P-K5 

B-B4 

36 

B.Q6 

B-Kt3 

45 

P-B4 

K-B5 

37 

P-B3 

KxP 

46 

PxP 

PxP 

38 

P-Kt3 

P-K Kt5 

47 

P-R4 

PxP 

39 

PxP 

K-Kt4 

48 

PxP 

B-Kt3 


Black has his last little joke. White could 
have taken the Bishop, but was too tired to 
analyze. (What a terrible alibi!) 

49 B~Q6 B-Q1 52 P-R5 B-R5 

50 K-B4 K-K5 53 B-B6 B-Q1 

51 K-Kt5 K~Q4 64 P-R6 Resigns 


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of The Chess Review (covering the years 
tD 35, I33(i. 1937. 1033 and 1939), whose 
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from noted problem authorities 

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This offer will expire December 31 , 1940* 
Take advantage of it at once to he 

certain of getting your set. 


Leningrad 1939 
RUY LOPEZ 

(Notes by Fred Reinfeld) 

Rovner Guldin 

White Black 


1 P-K4 

P-K4 

24 Kt-Kt3 

Kt-B3 

2 Kt-KB3 

Kt*QB3 

25 BxKt 

PxB 

3 B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

26 B-Kt7 

R-Ktl 

4 B-R4 

P-Q3 

27 KtxRP 

Q-K3 

5 P-B3 

P-K Kt3 

28 B-B6 

P-R3 

6 P-Q4 

B-Q2 

29 BxB 

KtxB 

7 0-0 

B-Kt2 

30 Kt-B6 

R-R1 

8 PxP 

PxP 

31 P-R5 

P-B5 

9 B-K3 

Q-K2 

32 Kt-Q2 

Kt-Ktl 

10 P-QKt4 

P-Kt3 

33 KtxKt 

KRxKt 

11 Q-Q5 

Q-K3 

34 KR-Ktl 

Q-Q2 

12 Q-Q3 

Kt-B3 

35 KtxP 

RxKtP 

13 B-Kt3 

G-K2 

36 RxR 

QxR 

14 P-QR4 

P-QR4 

37 Q-R2 

R-R3 

15 P-Kt5 

Kt-QI 

3S Q-R4 

Q-B4 

16 B-B1 

Kt-Kt2 

39 Q-Kt4 

Q-B3 

17 B-R3 

Kt-B4 

40 Q-KtSch 

K-R2 

IS Q-K3 

0-0 

41 GhKt4 

QxP 

19 QKt-Q2 

KR-K1 

42 Q-K15 

R-R2 

20 Kt-KI 

Kt-Kt5 

43 Q-85 

R*R3 

21 Q-K2 

Q-R5 

44 QxBP 

R*QB3 

22 Kt(1)-B3 

Q-K2 

45 Kt-Q2 

Q-Q4 

23 B-Q5 

GR-B1 

46 Q-Kt7 

P-K5 


Guldin 



Rovner 


White's early position play was admirable, 
but after move 30 or so, he began to lean too 
strongly on the QRP; one would think that it 
is all up with Black now, but he manages to 
find curious resources, until White almost 
breaks his neck trying to snare a draw. 

47 P*R6 

Evidently satisfied that this vicious-looking 
Pawn puts an end to the struggle. But Black 
reacts sturdily. 

47 . . , . BxP 

48 P-R7 BxR 

Now the victorious queening will have to be 
postponed, for if 49 P-RS(Q), R-BSch; 50 Kt- 
Bl, RxKtCh; 51 KxR, Q-QS mate, 

49 Kt-BI B-Q5> 

Amazingly enough, this should have been the 
winning move! White must now queen, whether 
he likes it or not! 


ISO 


T H H C H ESS He V 1 E w 


50 P-R8{Q) BxPch ! 

The grrrim drama unfolds! If now 51 K-R1, 
R-BS with the following delicious possibilities 
given in "The Field”— 

I 52 Q.(8)-R6 n QxQ and White cannot re- 
take! 

II 52 Q{7) H6 h QxQ and likewise! 

HI 52 P-Kt3, RxKtch; 53 KKt2 f R-Kt8ch; 
51 KxB. Q-Q5ch and mate follows, 

IV 52 Q-RSeh, KxQ; 53 Q-KL2ch f Q-Q5; 51 
QxR, P-K 6 and wins. 

51 KxB Q-Q5ch 

Again leaving White no choice, since if 52 
Kt-K3, R-B7ch leads to mate. 

52 K-Kt3 R B6ch 

53 K-B4 P-KGch 

54 Q-K4 Q B3ch 

55 K-Kt4 P-R4ch? 


'This looks murderous, yet it misses a clear 
win by 55 . , , 1M\7 (threatening . . . Q-Ktl 
mate); 56 Kt-Kl3, Q-KMch; 57 K-R3, Q-RIcli 

el c. 

56 K-R3 P-K7ch 

57 Kt-Kt3 P-K8 (Q) 

Another Queen!!— and it can't he captured. 
What to do?! 

58 Q-Ktech! ! 1 „ * ■ . 

Forcing an "easy” draw. 


58 , . . . 

KxQ 

59 Q-K8ch 

K-R2 

60 Q’KtSch 

K-R3 

I’lio bashful monarch. 

61 Q-R7ch 

K-Kt4 

62 G-R6ch 

Drawn 


Once more indicating that chess is u hard 
game, There is a bright future for this freak 
encounter in ^believe-it-or-not” conipeiidiums. 


Moscow Championship 1940 
QUEEN’S GAMBIT DECLINED 


A. LiMenthal S, Belavenets 

White Black 


1 P-G4 

P-Q4 

22 Q-Kt4ch 

K-Ktl 

2 P-QB4 

P-K 3 

23 R-K7 

K-R 1 

3 K1-QB3 

Kt-KB3 

24 BxP 

KR-Q1 

4 B-Kt5 

B-K2 

25 QR-K1 

R-Q2 

5 P-K3 

P- K R 3 

26 R-K8ch 

RxR 

6 B-R4 

0-0 

27 RxRch 

K-R2 

7 Kt-B3 

KtK5 

28 B Kt6ch! 

KxB 

8 BxB 

QxB 

29 Kt-K5ch 

K-R2 

9 Q-B2 

KtxKt 

30 KtxQ 

KtxR 

10 QxKt 

P-QB3 

31 Kt-Q4 

P-QKt4 

11 B-Q3 

Kt-Q2 

32 P-KR3 

Kt-B3 

12 0-0 

PxP 

33 Kt-K6 

Kt-Q4 

13 BxP 

P-QKt3 

34 Q-K4ch 

K-Ktl 

14 P-K4 

B.K12 

35 Kt-B5 

R*K2 

15 KR.K1 

KR-K1 

36 Q-B5 

R-KB2 

16 QR Q1 

P,QR3 

37 Q-K5 

B-R1 

17 P-Q5 

KPxP 

38 KbK6 

K-R2 

18 PxP 

Q’Q3 

39 Q-Kt8 

B-B3 

19 PxP 

GxP 

40 P-KR4 

P,Kt3 

20 Q-Q4 

Kt*B3 

41 Kt-Q8 

Resigns 

21 B-K13 

K-B1 ? 




A sudden counter-! hr usl turns the day. 

RUY LOPEZ 


H, Seidman 

White 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

3 

B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

4 

B-R4 

Kt-B3 

5 

0-0 

P-QKt4 

6 

B-Kt3 

B-K2 

7 

Q K2 

P-Q3 

8 

P-B3 

Kt-QR4 

9 

B-B2 

P-B4 

10 

P-Q4 

Q-B2 

11 

P-KR3 

B-Q2 

12 

P-Q5 

0-0 

13 

QKt-Q2 

Kt-R4 

14 

Kt-Kt3 

KtxKt 

15 

RPxKt 

P-Kt3 

16 

P-K Kt4 

Kt-Kt2 

17 

B-R6 

KR-OKtl 

18 

Kt-Q2 

P-R4 



Buenos Aires Teai 


ALEKHINE 

* 

H* Reed 


(Chile) 



While 


1 

P-K4 

Kt-K83 

2 

P-K5 

Kt-Q4 

3 

P-Q4 

P-Q3 

4 

Kt-K B3 Kt-QB3? 

5 

P-B4 

Kt Kt3 

6 

P-K6I 

PxP 

7 

B-Q3 

Kt-Q2 

8 

0-0 

Kt-B3 

9 

R-K 1 

P-K 4 

10 

PxP 

KtxP 

11 

KtxKt 

PxKt 

12 

RxP 

Q-Q3 

13 

B-B4 

B-Kt5 


W. W* Adams 

Black 


19 

P-KB4 

P-B3 

20 

R-B2 

P-R5 

21 

QR-KB1 

RPxP 

22 

KtxP 

P-B5 

23 

Kt-BI 

P-K15 

24 

K-R2 

P-Kt6 

25 

B-Q1 

R-R8 

26 

Q-Q2 

KR-R1 

27 

B-K2 

Kt-KI 

28 

PxP 

QPxP 

29 

P-Q6! 

KtxP 

30 

Q-Q5ch 

K-R 1 

31 

P-Kt5 

B-B3 

32 

Q-K6 

KtxP 

33 

Q-B7 

R-KKtl 

34 

PxP 

KtxKBP 

35 

RxKt 

Resigns 


Tournament 1939 
DEFENSE 


G, Danielsson 

(Sweden) 

Black 


14 

Q-Q2 

Q-Q2 

15 

Kt-B3 

R-Q 1 

16 

Kt-Q5 

P-B3 

17 

Q*B2 

K-B2 

18 

P-KR3 

PxKt 

19 

PxB 

QxP 

20 

B-B5! 

QxQB 

21 

B-K6ch 

K-K1 

22 

Q-R4ch 

R*Q2 

23 

RxP 

Q-B2 

24 

RxR 

KtxR 

25 

R-Q1 

Resigns 



"An’ don't annoy my partner. He's busy, too!" 

fjittretice Reytt&Us (Colliers} 



Famous Last Round Tourney Thrills 

By Paul Hugo Little 


CAPABLAMCA-ELISKASES, Moscow, 1936 

The year 1936 was a memorable one in 
chess for many reasons, but perhaps principally 
because it marked two great triumphs in tour- 
nament competition for Capabknca, the former 
world champion, 

There had been many critics who had, with 
their usual flair for glib generalisations and 
dubious divisions, assigned Capa to the ranks 
of those masters who had reached their zenith 
and were no longer capable of great accom- 
plishment. 

But after these two tournaments, Notting- 
ham and Moscow, no one could deny that the 
Cuban was still one of the world's greatest 
players and deserving of a title match. 

Nottingham has already been adequately 
dealt with. We turn at once to the Moscow 
tournament, held during May and June to 
commemorate the centennial of the birth of 
William Steinitz, that intrepid pioneer and 
original thinker whose chess ideas still in- 
fluence present-day players. 

l ive foreign masters were invited to play 
against a similar number of Russian masters, 
Capabknca, Dr. Lasker, Flohr, Lilienthal and 
Fliskases were the foreign contingent; and the 
Russians were Botwinnik, who had won the 
1935 Moscow- tourney, Kan, Levenfisch, Riu- 
min and Ragosin. 

Enthusiasm has always been one of the 
Russians' greatest virtues. It was evidenced 
in their interest in this tournament. On the 
opening day over 2,000 tilled the seats in the 
hall where the tourney was held, standing room 
was jammed, and crowds stood outside the 
building waiting for news. 

On May 1 4 the first round began. Kan 
held Capabknca to a meritorious draw; in 
fact, all the five games were drawn. The play 
was very even for six rounds. The leaders at 
that time were Capabknca and Botwinnik, 4 
each, and Lasker 3 Vo - 

In the seventh round Botwinnik met Capa- 
bknca, the former having White. The young 
Russian grandmaster completely outplayed 
Capa, only to lose because of a hastily con- 
sidered sacrifice. Ragosin beat Lasker in this 
round with a beautiful combination, 

In Round 8 Capabknca tightened his hold 
on first place by bearing Lilienthal in a beauti- 
ful game, while Botwinnik could only draw 
with Ragosin. After nine rounds and the 


first half of the tourney w f as concluded, the 
top scores were: Capabknca, 6y 2 ; Botwinnik, 
Lasker and Ragosin, 5 each; Kan and Leven- 
fisch 4y 2 . Flohr, with 4 points, was out of 
form, having lost to Ragosin in the third 
round and to Kan in the ninth. 

In the tenth round, the players began the 
second half of the tournament, with colors 
reversed. Much interest was expressed over 
the showing of the veteran Dr. Lasker. He 
suffered a setback when he overlooked a piece 
against Botwinnik, losing in 21 moves. Capa- 
bknca beat Kan in the same round. 

Capabknca maintained his lead, running 
about even with Botwinnik for several rounds. 
They were paired again in the sixteenth round. 
Botwinnik naturally had to try for a win, and 
very nearly lost. He managed to salvage the 
draw, however, and Capa retained his lead of 
a full point. 

In the seventeenth and semi-final round Capa 
drew in 21 moves of a Four Knights opening 
with Lilienthal. Botwinnik beat Ragosin in a 
superb last-minute effort, and came up to 
within half a point of the ex- world champion. 

The last round opened with the pairings 
of Capabknca vs. JEliskases and Botwinnik vs. 
Levenfisch. If Botwinnik won and Capa only 
drew, the two would tie for first place. Botwim 
nik seemed to have better chances, since Leven- 
fisch had not displayed the same form as at the 
1935 Moscow tourney. The opening was a 
Sicilian against Levenfischk P-K4, and a hard 
battle resulted. 

Capabknca, aware of the danger of being 
overtaken, played to win against Eiiskases. This 
he accomplished in a magnificent effort, and as 
Botwinnik only drew, the first prize was Capa's 
by a margin of a full point. 

The following decisive game is an example 
both of the will to win in the last round, and 
of Capabknca \s superlatively classical style. 


GIUOCO PIANO 


J. R. Capablanca 

White 


E. Ellskases 
Black 


1 P-K4 P-K4 

2 Kt-KB3 Kt-GB3 

3 B-B4 B-B4 


■ Shades of Steinitz! A tribute to that mas- 
ter's memory, for this opening was popular 
during his era. 

4 Kt*B3 Kt-B3 

5 P*Q3 P-Q3 

6 B-KKt5 


181 


182 


T h ii Chess Review 


This is known as the Canal \ iiriftuoii, be- 
cause of the Peruvian master's success with 
it at Carlsbad, 1929. 

6 , , , , P-KR3 

Bogoljubow against Becker, in the last 
round at Carlsbad , played the superior 6 . , , 
KI-QR4. If then 7 Kt-Q5, P-R3: 8 KtxKtch, 
PxKt, with KtxB to follow, 

7 BxKt 

7 E-R4 is inadvisable because of . . . P- 
KKU, and 7 B-K3 would indicate that the pre- 
vious move was useless. The exchange wins 
two important tempi. 

7 , , , . QxB 

8 Kt-Q5 Q-Q1 

3 . . . Q-KtS has been tried here. 

9 P-B3 Kt-K2 

Capablanca castled at this point against 
Canal at Carlsbad, and Elis bases here uses 
a move played by Paul Johner at the same 
tournament 

10 Kt- K3 .... 

This was Capa’s new move, and probably the 
reason for bis choice of the opening. 


10 


B-K3 


Black should try to hold the center by 10 
. , O-O; 11 0-0 > B-KU5; 12 P-Q4, Kt-Kt3. 


11 BxB 

12 Q-K13 

13 P-Q4 


PxB 

Q-B1 


Not n KtxP? with the idea 13 
14 Q-KtSch, because of 13 * . . BxKt. 


PxKt? 


13 . . . , 

14 KtxP 

15 PxB 

16 0-0 
17 QR-B1 


PxP 

BxKt 

0-0 

Q-Q2 


White gains no advantage from 17 QxKtP f 
KR-Ktl: IS Q-Rfi, RxP: 19 R-Ktl, R-Kt3; 20 
Q-H3, QH-Ktl, etc. 


17,,,, 

18 R-B3 

19 Q-B2 


QR-Ktl 

P-Q4 

P-B3 


Kt- 


Btack had better prospects with 19 . . 

R3; 2(1 R-Ql, PxP; 21 QxP, QR-QR or 20 PxP, 
PxP; 21 R-B5, KtxP; 22 Q-Ql, Kt-B3; 23 RxP, 
Q-K3, etc. 


20 P-K5 

21 GPQ1 

22 P-B3 


R-B5 

QR-KB1 

Q-Q1 


This loses time, where it was necessary 
to take measures against White’s threat to 
storm forward with his K side Pawns. Better 
was 22 . . . R(B6)-B2. If then 23 P-KKtS, Kt- 
R4 ; 24 KtxKt, RxKt; 25 P-E4. P-KKM, with 
good chances of counter-play. 


23 P-K Kt3 

24 P-B4 

25 KtxKt 

26 P-KR41 


R(B5)-B2 

Kt-B4 

RxKt 


Now Black dare not play . . . P-KKt4, since 
27 RPxP, PxP; 28 K-Kt2 am! R-R] would fol- 
low. 


26 , . p , 
£7 K-Kt2 
28 P-R3 


P-KKt3 

Q-K2 


A "prophylactic” move a la Nimzoviteh. 


28 , . , , Q-Kt2 

29 QR-B3 Q-K2 

30 Q-B2 K-Kt2 

34 R-K Ktl 


31 P^KKt4 R(B4)-B2 

32 K-R3 Q-Q2 

33 P-Kt4 R-KKtl 


Not 34 P-B5. KtPxP; 35 PxP, PxP; 36 RxP, 
R(Kt)-KRl ; 37 K-Ktl, Q*K3; 38 P-R5, K-Rl E 
and Black can double Rooks on the KKt hie. 
One almost agonizingly awaits White's P-KR5. 


34 ... . 

35 Q-Q2 

36 Q-KB2 


K-R1 
R-R2 
P-K R4 


This is playing into White's hands, but 
marking time would only delay the coming 
break. 


37 

PxP 

RxP 

38 

R-Kt5 

Q-R2 

39 

Q~Kf3 

Q-R3 

40 

Q~Kt4 

R-Kf2 

41 

R-Kt3 

K-R2 


The restricted, almost symmetrical position 
of all the pieces is indeed curious. 


42 R^Kte 

43 K-Kt3 

44 R-KR2 

45 R-R3 


K~R1 

K-R2 

R-K2 

K-Kt2 


White finally gets his chance. The stall, 
45 . . - R-Kl was better, since if then IK RxR, 
PxR ! 

Eliskases 



% 




i 








mm 





iltli 







Ef£ 

4Lil 




mm 



mm. 










Capablanca 


46 RxR! 

47 QxQ 

48 P-B5 1 

49 K-B4 


QxR 

PxQ 

PxP 


The advance of the King hresistably re- 
minds one of a similar manoever, also by 
Capablanca, against Tartakower in a famous 
game at New York, 1924, 


49 , , . . 

50 KxP 

51 P-K6 


R-K3 

R-Kt3 

R-Kt5 


52 K-K5 

53 K-Q6 

54 R“K3 


R-K5ch 

RxQP 

Resigns 


A great, effort! It is very similar to the 
Tarrasch-Walbrodt game at Vienna, 1898. 


November, 1940 


183 


TEXAS CHESS ASSOCIATION 


CHESS BY RADIO 


The popular J. C. Thompson of Dallas, who 
was one of the chief organizers of the Open 
Tournament held there this summer, won the 
annual tourney of the Texas Chess Association, 
at Fort Worth, August 31 to September 2, 
thus gaining the Texas championship for the 
third time since 1936. Second honors were 
taken by Weaver W. Adams of Boston. Neither 
lost a game, but Adams allowed three draws 
while Thompson permitted only two. Daniel 
Mayers, University of Arizona student, repre- 
sented Tucson and took third place, drawing 
four games and losing only to Adams. 


Thompson sends us an interesting editorial 
which appeared in the Dallas Morning News, 
from which we quote: 

“Newspapermen In particular find it hard to 
get the ‘angles' in chess. Reuben Fine and 
Herman Steiner, for example, are profession- 
als; yet neither promises in advance of a con- 
test to ‘moider de big bum/ They have no 
press agents. They do not dress the part. 
They carry no claque with them. A man who 
makes his living at teaching chess, for ex- 
ample. will sit down with a clergyman come 
down In Dallas on his vacation, and they will 
fight it out across the board in a silence that 
is thunderous only to those who know what 
is happening/' 


RUY LOPEZ 


J. C. Thompson 
White 


A. Elo 

Black 


1 P-K4 

P-K4 

20 Q*K3 

KtxB 

2 Kt KB3 

Kt-QB3 

21 QxKt 

R-B2 

3 B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

22 R-KKtl 

QR-KB1 

4 B*R4 

Kt-BS 

23 R-Kt2 

Q-B1 

5 0-0 

B-K2 

24 QR-KKtl 

R-K1 

6 Q-K2 

P-Q Kt4 

25 Kt-R4 

B-B1 

7 B-Kt3 

0-0 

26 Q-K3 

Q-Q1 

8 P-B3 

P-Q3 

27 Kt{3)-B5 

! PxKt 

9 P-KR3 

Kt-QR4 

28 KtPxP 

R ( K)-K2 

10 B-B2 

P*B4 

29 Q-R6 

B-B1 

It P-Q4 

Q-B2 

30 R-Kt4 

R-R2 

12 R-Q1 

Kt-B3 

31 Kt-Kt61 

R{B)-Kt2 

13 QKt-Q2 

B-Q2 

32 R-R4 

PxKt 

14 P-Q5 

Kt-QI 

33 PxP 

Kt-R4 

15 Kt-BI 

Kt-KI 

34 QxKt 

B-Kt2 

16 P-KKt4 

P-B3 

35 Q-R7ch 

K-B1 

17 Kt-Kt3 

P-Kt3 

36 Q*R8chl 

BxQ 

18 B-R6 

Kt-KKt2 

37 RxBch 

K-K2 

1 9 K-R2 

Kt-B2 

38 P-Kt7 ! 

Resigns 


QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED 


H , Ste i n e r 

J. C, Thompson 

White 


Black 


1 Kt-KB3 

P-Q4 

7 PxKt 

Kt-B3? 

2 P-Q4 

KI-KB3 

8 P-Q5 1 

Kt-K2 

3 P-B4 

P.K3 

9 B-Kt5ch 

B-Q2 

4 Kt-B3 

P-B4 

10 BxBch 

QxB 

5 PxQP 

KtxP 

11 Kt-K5 

Q*Kt4 

6 P-K4 

KtxKt 

12 PxP 

Resigns 

For if 12 , . . 

PxP; 13 R-QKtt! 



Editoi'-““The Chess Review" 

Following your suggestion In current issue 
of “The Chess Review" that radio amateurs 
send in their frequency and call letters, I 
submit the following: 

During the past year 1 have played many 
enjoyable games of chess by radio with the 
following: 

W9QMD, Robert C. Morwood 
616 Delmar 
Springfield, Mo. 

Frequency: 7170, 3685 kc. 

WSNOT, Ken Wright 
4033 Delmar Ave. 

Toledo, Ohio 

Frequency: 7080 kc. 

W6MYT, Joseph V Hartshorn 
Box 151 

Hollydale, Calif. 

Frequency: 7170, 3585 kc. 

W5HJF, J. G. Hancock 
110 SE Nevada St. 

Portales, New Mexico 
Frequency: 3703, 3510, 7030 kc. 

W9KIK, A. A. Simon 
3119 Giles Ave. 

SL Louis, Mo. 

Frequency: 3585, 7170 kc. 

My own name and frequencies: 

W5EN1, I>r. H. W. Gillett, (M ,D,) 

Lovington* New Mexico 
Frequency: 3703, 3630, 7260, 7170, 7080 kc. 

Covington being a small town, it is virtu- 
ally necessary to play chess by radio if one 
is to have opponents to play with. All games 
are played using code (CW) signals. Chess 
is very satisfactorily being played by radio, r 
expect that during the coming fall and winter 
radio season we may have a chess-radio net- 
work in full operation, for we are already 
learning of other enthusiasts who are anxious 
to join us. 

Yours truly, 

H, W. GILLETT, M,D. 

Lovington, New Mexico 



Under -Promotion in the Endgame 

By Irving Gh erne v 


Under- promotion studies have long been 
favored by endgame composers, There is some- 
thing artistic about a position which requires 
the promotion of a Pawn to a minor piece 
rather than the almost inevitable Queen. The 
motive for under-promotion is generally as- 
sociated with stalemate. It may be to avoid 
an impending stalemate in playing to win, 
or to create one when intent on a draw. 


I P-Q8(Kt), PxP; 2 Kt-B7, P-Q6; 2 Kt-Rtf, 
PxKt; 4 P-Kt7, P-R4 ; 5 F-Kt8(Kt), P-R5 ; 6 
Kt-B6, PxKt; 7 PK7, P-R4; 8 P-KS(Kt), P-B5; 
9 Kt-Q6 t PxKt; 10 P-B7, P-Q4; 11 P-B8(Kt) f 
P-Q5; 12 Kt-Kt0, PxKt; 13 P-R7, P-Ktl; 14 
P-R8 (Kt), P-Kto; 15 Kt-Kt6, P-KtOch; 16 K-R3, 
P-Kf.7 ; 17 KI-B4, P-Kt8(Q); 18 RxQ, P-Q8(Q); 
19 RxQ, P-Q7 ; 20 Kt-KtS, P-Q3; 21. R-Rl, P~ 
Q8(Q) ; 22 KtxQ, any; 23 Kt.-B2 mate, If 1 
. . . P-B5 ; 2 Kt-B7 f P-E6; 3 Kt-Kt5, PB7; 4 
Kt-K4. 


In the following example Black is almost 
stalemate for some twenty moves, but is finally 
cornered. After you find or go through the 
solution, ask some friend to point out the 
mating piece from the diagram! 


L.ibturkin 



White to play and win 


The next diagram is a first prize winner by 
the same composer. The avoidance of Black's 
mating threat is the controlling factor. The 
series of under- promotions in an ascending 
scale are a unique feature. 


Libiurkin 



White to play and win 


TOURNAMENT books 

1877 Leipzig— Schallop ____ „_Ger. 3,00 

1878 Paris— Schallop 3,00 

1883 Nuremburg— lacks 2 rds._Ger. 2,00 

1900 Munich — Marco, Schlechter 

Ger t 3.00 

1900 Paris — Rosenthal Fr, 5.00 

1902 Hanover Ger, 3,00 

1904 Cambridge Springs— Reinfeld 

Eng. 1.50 

1905 Barmen Ger. 6,50 

1916 Riga Cor res, Matches Eiig. 1.00 

1921 Berlin — Kagan Ger, 2,00 

1921 Hamburg— Dimer Ger, 2,00 


192S 

Frankfu rt 

Ger. 

1,50 

1927 

New York 

Rus, 

2.50 

1931 

Prague _ 

Hung, 

1.00 

1932 

Grosse Fernturnier 

— ,, .Ger. 

3.50 

1935 

Barcelona — Koitanowski __Fr + 

1.25 

1935 

Warsaw Team Tour.— 

Reinfeld 




Eng. 

2.00 

1936 

Nottingham— Alekhine __Eng. 

5.00 


BOOKS OF MATCHES 


1921 

Capablanca-Lasker 

Eng. 

6,00 

1934 

Alekhine-Bogof jubov 


.60 

1937 

Alekhine-Euwe 

Eng, 

1.00 


Send all orders directly to: The Chess Review, 25 West 43rd St., 
New York, N. Y. No individual is authorized to accept orders for us. 


184 



November, 19 4 0 


135 


1 Kt-K4ch, K-QS ; 2 Kt-B5ch, K-B6; 3 Kt-Kt3, 
B-K4; 4 F-B4, R-KL2; 5 F-K8<Kt), B-Rl; S 

P-B5, B-K4 ; 7 B-R2, BxB ; 8 P-K17, B-K4; 9 
P-KtS(B), BxB; 10 KI-B7, BxKt; 11 P-K7, 
B-K4 ; 12 P-K8 0R), B-B3; 13 R K6, B-Kt2; 14 
P-B6 and wins- Not. 9 F-Kt8(Q), because of 
. , , K-B5ch; 10 QxB, P-B8(Q)ch; 11 KtxQ, 
stalemate* 12 P-Kg(Q) would lead to the same 
draw. 

Here is a case where Black threatens an 
under-promotion, P-B8(Kt)ch! It takes a 
whole drove of new steeds to carry the day. 


Korobkov 



White to play and win 


1 K-R5cli, KxK; 2 Kt-B4ch, K-R3; 3 P-KIX 
(Kt.)ch p K-R2; 4 Kt(Kj.8)-Bfich, K-R3; 5 KtxP 
ch,. K-R2; G Kt(K8)-Bt>eh, K-K12 ; 7 Kt-KScR 
K-B2; 8 P-Q8(Kt)ch, KK2; 9 P-B8(Kt) mate.. 

The following, one of the most beautiful 
endgames ever composed, shows under-promo- 
tion on both sides, with very accurate play 
required to reach the peaceful conclusion. 


Richter 



White to play and draw 


1 B-B6, QxB; 2 P-Kt5ch, QxP; 3 P-KtS(Kt) 
ch 5 K-Kt.3 ; 4 P-QS(Q), QxQ; 5 P-K7, Kt-Q3 ; 
6 PxQ(Kt) , Kt-B2ch; 7 KLxKt h KxKt; 8 KL- 
R6ch, K-Bl ; 9 Kt-B5, P-R7; 10 KtxP, P-RS{R); 
11 Kt'Kfich, K-B2; .12 Kt-Q8ch, K-K13 ; 13 K- 
Kt8, R-R1 ; 14 P-R8(Kt)ch, K-B3; 15 Kt-E7. 



MRS. EMIL HOUSFELD 


W isco min W o m e n ’ s C ha m pio ns hi p — M r s . 
Bmii Housfeld won this without the loss of a 
game- The standings: Mrs. Housfeld (Mil- 
waukee) 3-0; Mrs* Fischer (Milwaukee) 2-1; 
Mrs. LaRouche (Sheboygan) 1-2; Miss Perham 
(Racine) 0-3. Mrs- Housfeld is the outstand- 
ing Wisconsin player, though Mrs. Rosemary 
Fischer runs her a close second. She first 
won the Milwaukee women's championship in 
1936 and is still women's champion of the 
city, having successfully defended her title this 
year against Mrs. Fischer* Mrs. Housfeld, 
though born in Omaha, has lived in Milwaukee 
for the past ten years- She is the mother of 
two sons, aged seven and two. Her hobbies, 
she writes, "are chess, chess, golf, and assisting 
her husband in amateur photography. Pet 
peeve — lack of women, interested in chess/' 
Last winter she played on the W her ley team 
which won the league play in Milwaukee. She 
has only been playing chess for five years. 

—E.LW. 


Have You An Insurance Problem? 


Expert advice may be necessary 

ISAAC KASHDAN 


is the man to consult. No charge 
for surveys or policy analysis, 

I LIFE : ANNUITIES : AUTOMOBILE 
FIRE : BURGLARY : LIABILITY 

AM forms of insurance written* 

175 Fifth Avenue, New York City 
Telephone ALgonquin 4-2895 

I 


186 


T H t Chisss Review 


Commercial Chess 

The Commercial Chess League of New York 
has started its annual round -rob in series of 
matches, with eleven teams taking part in tlie 
competition. Results of the first round were: 
Bankers Trust 2VL Chase National l 1 /^ ; Postal 


Telegraph 1 14, Real Estate Board 2V S ; Bell 
Telephone 2, New York Telephone 0 (2 ad- 
journed); Stock Exchange l^ t Consolidated 
Edison 2 14 ; American Telephone 3, Central 
Hanover 1 ; New York Times bye. 

Below is the Consolidated Edison team, 
which won the trophy for the 19394940 season. 



Left to right: D. J, Kennealy, R. S. Leach, F. D. Hutchinson, W. E + Brunberg, 

E. B, Henrcksen and G, R r Corn. 

Sitting: Chairman Fred Gfaeser and Conrad Totten. 


Bad Kissingen, 1928 
N i mzowitsch 



Capablanca 


Black to make his 1.3Ui move. 

in this position, NimzowiUch played 13 . . . 
ExKt and the game, after exciting complica- 
tions,, ended in a draw. Several annotators 
suggested instead 13 t , , K-Rl in order to 
continue with 14 , , . R-Ktt and 15 * + * P- 
KB4 and perhaps win with the pawn ahead. 

After 13 , , , K-Rl* can you find how Capa- 
blanca would have forced a quick win? 

'a Hu li axfi si il ‘90 

-m 9t 4:>i*d 'swi-(ss)ra st -zx-s ‘^x-ix n 


Hastings, 1922 
Thomas 



Alekhine 


White to make his 26lh move. 

Alekhine played 25 P-Q5I, KPxP; 27 BxP, 
RxB; 2H PxP, BxP; 29 RxQ and had a BO 
move game on his hands. 

Instead, as he himself points out,, the quick 
method would have been 29 RxB 3, Q K2 • 30 
RES, R-R2; 31 R-Kt8 followed by R(Q1) Q8, 


REMEMBER TO . . , , 

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 




Problem Department 

By Vincent L, Eaton 

Address all correspondence relating to this department to V.L , Eaton, 2237 Q Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 
Questions About Problem Matters Will Be Answered If Accompanied By Return Postage. 


SIXTY TWO-MOVERS OF THE 
PAST SIXTY YEARS 
Part V 

By Alain C, White 

In out review of the two-movers of the past 
sixty years, we must not overlook the com- 
plete block problems of all kinds; the simple 
blocks, as in the charming No, 3 700, the added 
mate blocks, as in No, 1624, and the changed 
mate blocks, as in No. 1701, (and tlie masterly 
eight.-self-bloek task problem, No, 1702 — Ed- 
itor). On the whole, however, the complete 
block problem has not lived up to the high 
hopes it aroused in the early years of the 
1900’s. Restricting the free action of the 
White pieces has Loo often made these posi- 
tions clumsy rather than strategic, and the 
use or changed mate keys in non-block form 
has proved to be a more valuable strategic 
medium, Great problems of this character 
include No, 1703, with changes in the half- 
pin checks after I . * . SxPdGch and 1 * , . 
SxPeSeh; No, 1704, w T ith changed mates after 
the modern defenses 1 . . . Sen and 1 , , , 
Sl'3, which combine self-unpins and tlie open- 
ing of White guard; and No. 1705, with in- 
tricate changed crosschecks alter 1 . . . QbSch 
and 1 , . . Qhbch. There is an unexpectedly 
brilliant key in No. 1706, where a single move 
changes the set crosscheck while offering 
Black three additional new ones, plus a flight- 
square, If 1 were to choose a single key-move 
as the most delightful of all in this selection, 
[ should probably turn to No, 1658, The beau- 
tiful and well-balanced position, free of White 
Pawns and with the four odd Black Pawns 
on the second rank, furnishes a perfect setting 
wherein the key reveals itself with a thrill 
that has rarely been approached. 

With the specially selected Nos. 1707-1716 
this brief review of sixty years of energetic 
problem activity comes to a close. One would 
wish that the selection might have included 
so many more composers and so many further 
great works by the authors already repre- 
sented! Just what omissions have been the 
most serious? That is a question which the 
reader can help us very much to answer. I 
should greatly welcome your sending me your 
own selection of 25 favorite two-movers, ex- 
plaining the basis on which they were chosen. 
Where the selection includes works already 
in the present set, these will serve to in- 
dicate which are the greatest universal favor- 
ites; where new positions are sent, they will 
be tabulated and the votes they receive can 
be compared. (Do not hesitate to include 
problems of your own, I specially asked Mr, 
Gamage and Mr. Mansfield, in making their 
choices, to include favorites of their own 
composition, and I would like to see yours, 
too.) In any case the most interesting 25 
sets sent in will be given book prizes. The 
sets may be sent to me at Litchfield, Con- 
necticut, and all will be acknowledged. 

(The End) 


THE TRIPLE GRIMSHAW 

(A second note) 

Your Problem Editor is always prepared to 
eat any words be may say in this department, 
and here is a case where he gladly makes 
himself chew them ! Shortly after last month's 
article, “A Challenge to Composers,” had been 
sped oil its way to the printer, I was reading 
through Umnoffs book on the Russian Chess 
Problem, when much to my delight I dis- 
covered several examples of Lhe complete 
"triple Grimshaw,” fulfilling all the required 
thematic conditions. Consequently I take back 
in toto my statement about the probable non- 
existence of such task exemplars, and change 
it hastily to “few illustrations of the theme 
have been produced.” 

Simplest in design and execution of the 
examples I discovered is the following: 

(By L. L Loschinsky, Tijdschrift v. d. Ned. 
Schaakbond, 1930) b3K2b, rlRSplr, 4k3, 1S1 s 4, 
2RP1Q2, 8, 8, 8. Mate in two by 1 Bb3. 

Here there are three Grimshaw pairs: by 
1 , , , Bb7 and 1 * , . Rb7; 3 . Bg7 and 1 

, , . Rg7; and 1 , . * Bf6 and 1 . . . Pf6, in 

this case the Pawn 16 being the equivalent 
of a Black Rook, 

In the following, there are but;, two pairs 

of thematic pieces, with one set (the Rook 

gG and Bishop h3) cleverly performing double 
duty: 

(By L. J. Loschinsky, Italia Scacchistica, 
1930) 5S2, 2K2E2, Flp3rl, lpk5, 1S5R, 2pP3b, 
rlQ4B, b4R2. Mate in two by 1 Rbl, with 
thematic variations after 1 . . . Rb2 or 1 
. , . Bb2; 1 * , , Re6 or Be6; and 1 , , , Rg4 
or 1 * * . Bgh 

This is a somewhat unusual strategic com- 
bination, in that a pinned Black Queen Is 
used to force a. third set of Grimshaws: 

(By B. and S. Pimenoff, Trud, 1935) lQrb4, 
8, Ipl R4, 2k2bSl, plP2R2, Kp6, P2Prq2, 2S3BTL 
Mate in two by 1 PxP, with Grimshaws after 

1 , ♦ * Re3! or Qe3E; 3 Re4 or 1 , , ( 

Be4; and 1 . . . Rc7 or 1 . . . Rc7. 

That other versions of the task are possible 
is shown by our No. 1G90, modelled by Mr. 
Du Beau after one of Blake’s classic settings. 
And so we bring this note to a temporary 
close, asking the question: What else can be 
done along these lines? Composers, bestir 
yourselves! 

* * * * 

Just after our last issue had gone to press, 
we received word from Mr. Gamage that No. 
1714 was intended to be substituted for No, 
1679 in the “Sixty Best” selection. Readers 
will note this change, which does not, however, 
cancel No. 3679 from the Ladder competition. 
As all who have solved it will agree, it de- 
serves republication on its own merits. Of 
No, 1714, a recent prize-winner, the tourney 
judge (Comins Mansfield) commented: “An 
easy first, showing magnificent play by the 
White Knight battery in an unusually open 
setting. At least one solver overlooked the 
best variation, 1 , . . Rxa3E 2 SgG!” 


187 


188 


The Chess Review 


SOLUTIONS 

No* 1636 by F* Garaage : 1 PxcT (Two points} 

Masked threats combined with exquisite 
pi n work— Ho the n be rg* 

NOh 1637 by Dr, P. G* Keeney: 1 23a7 (Two i>oiit Ls J 
Intricate self- pinning defense play — 
Gibbs, Unexpected sacrifice -evacuation 
key— Du Beau* 

No. 1G38 by G. Mott-Smith: For White, 1 Qf2; for 
Black, 1 BdT (Two points each) 

More limited in scope than the actual 

g rhsc- winner, but pleasant enough — 
othenberg. 

No, 1639 by W, B* Suesnmn: Y Kg 8 (Two points) 

A terror for tries! Beautiful interference 
play— Rot hen berg, A nice variety of 
interferences — Edelstein. Delightful vari- 
ations — Du Beau. 

No. 1610 by F. W. Watson: * QgJ (Two points; 

Unexpected key leading - to One major and 
one minor changed mate — Rot hen berg. 
Zugzwang key — Dod. Innocent appearing 
key. yet it changes two mates in this 
light mutate— Gibbs. 

No. 16-11 by the Problem Editor: 1 Pf. r > (Two 

points) 

No. 164 2 by the Problem Editor: 1 (Two 

point s) 

No, 1'64B by the Problem Editor: 1 &Se3-c4 (Two 
points) 

No. HIM by C. Du Beau: 1 Qg5 (Throe points) 

J , , , threat, 2 Qxf5ch; 1 , , , BxSch, 2 
RxBch; 1 . . , Ke4, 2 Qe7ch; I . . . KeG, 
2 Qffich. Fine key — Burst el n, 1 Qxb6 is 
n close try in this enigmatic set-up— 
Ho then berg. 

No. 1UI5 by C. Du Beau: 1 Qxd2 (Three points) 

1 . . . Kcf> or Ke7 T 2 Qxc2ch; 1 . , , Ken 
or Ke7, 2 Qxeich. A multi- High! echo 
with 12 flights — EdeJstein. Pleasant sym- 
metrical setting — Rothcnherg. This and 
1614 arc beautiful studies* except for the 
k eys — H e r z b e rge r , 

No, 1616 by the Problem Editor: Intended 3 Kd 6, 
but there is a. cook by 1 RgiJ (Three 
points each). Many solvers overlooked 
she seven 1 hematic variations in the 
author's solution, by t . , . Rcl moves; 
and some fell for the try 1 Kb7 t answered 
by 1 . . . Rdl or 1 . * . Pdl(H), 

No, 1647 by H. C. Mowty: 1 Rg6 (Three points) 
1 . * , threat, 2 SbTch: 1 , , . BxR. 2 
Qxlir 1 * * , Bel. 2 Qxli; \ . . . Bc4. 2 
PcUch; 1 . . * Kbti, 2 Sclch. Unfortu- 
nately cooked by 1 8b7ch (Three points). 
Difficult problem with masterly construc- 
tion. Mr* Mowry's return is cause for 
rejoicing — Rolhehberg. Dlllleult end In - 
torestlng—Heraberger, Surprising de- 
nouement — -Mott-Smith. 

No. IMS by the Problem Editor: 1 Rgl (Four 
points) 

1 , , , Kf4; 2 Bf2 t Ke4; 3 Be3. 

No, 1643 by L, W. Watson: 1 ShG (Five points) 

1 , , . PxS; 2 Ke4, Kg7; 3 QeSch, Kf8; 
4 Fg7ch, Kf7; 5 Kf5. Mate is forced 
very n ea tly— Fade r. 

No, 16 fill by L)r. P. G. Keeney: 1 Qd4 (Five points) 

] r , . BxQ; 2 Be S, Be5; 3 Bd4; 4 Be5; 
f) Bf6. 1 . . * Bffi; 2 Qefj, BxQ : 2 Rdl, 
etc. White bullies drive ecclesiastic to 
regicide — Dod* The matrix of many good 
suis presented baldly — Mott- Smith. Ex- 
quisite simplicity — Du Beau. 

No* 1651 by the Problem Editor: l Rcl (Five 
points) 

1 . . * RxR; 2 Rfl, Rdl; 3 Rci ; 4 Rdl; 5 
Rcl, 1 , . . Rcl; 2 Rdl, RxR; 3 Rel ; 
4 Rdl; 5 Rcl, Dr, Keeney tolls us that 
No 1650 was an attempt at u diagonal 
version of a lateral example by George 
Hume, 1M1, We might, mention that 
Geoffrey Molt -Smith and others have 
done notable work with similar matrices. 
No, 1652 by A. Eller man: 1 Rd7 (Two points) 

A masterpiece^-Fader. 

No. 1653 by A, Mail: 1 SfS (Two points) 

No. 1654 by G* Guidelli : 1 Kf7 
No* 1655 by G. Guidelli: 1 Ba3 
No. 1656 by O. W. Sheppard: 1 Rgfi 
No. 1657 by A. Eilerinan: 1 Sd7 
No. 166S by J. A, Schtffriumn: I Qf3 

No, 1653 by J. A* Schlffmatm: 1 Kd5 

No* 1660 by J. A. Seh iff maim: 1 ReT-eS 

No, 1661 by J. A, SchifTmann; 1 BeK 

No. 1662 by G, Guidelli: 1 Ra3 


MINIATURE MUTATES 

No* 1(591 is a few-piece mutate, but it is a 
comparatively "'big fellow” when one looks at 
several other examples that have been done. 
Here are a few miniatures of the same type, 
for quick solving* 

1. By B. Harley and C* G + WaLney, Good 
Companions, 1921. 8, 5p2, 5K2, 7k, 7p, 7Q, 8, 8. 
Male in two. 

2. By W. Laugstaff and E. C, Mortimer, 

Chess Amateur, 1922. 8, 8, 8, 5K2, 6pk, 2Q5, 

8, 8* Mate In two. 

3* By H. Weenink, Good Companions, 1919. 
8, 3KS3, 8, 2plk3, 7Q, 3P4, 8, 8. Mate in two* 


INFORMAL LADDER 

(Maximum score for Nos, 1636-53: 59 points) 

L* Rothenberg 942, 53; A, Tauber 
804, 53; ^J* Hannus 856; G. Fairley 789, 53; 
K, Lay 665, 43; A. A, J* Grant 641, 42 (hope 
you're enjoying your new locale); H. Burstein 
628, 53 (I wish there were more enthusiasts 
like you); J. M* Dennison 630, 42; ****Dr ( G, 
Dobbs 599; Dr* M* Herzberger 542, 41; (de- 
lighted to see you back, Max, Stay with us); 

B, Daly 504, 51 (quite all right about 
late solutions; the date deadline is for prepar- 
ation of next month's copy only, and solutions 
received later are credited afterwards); P, A, 
Swart 515, 38; B. M. Marshall 530, 22; *Dr. 
P* G. Keeney 388, 53; E* Korpanty 380, 53; 
Dr, W, F. Sheldon 423; R* Neff 370, 36; ****G* 
Plowman 359, 54; J. Donaldson 336, 40; **1, 
Rivise 298, 51; C* E. Winnberg 280, 46; B* L. 
Fader 261, 53; W. C* Dod 242, 42; Sheftei 
222, 32; E* Popper 239; S. P. Shepard 211; 
A* Fortier 197; T* Lundberg 161, 32; A, B. 
Hodges 162; A, Gibbs 117, 36; J* Hudson 138; 
M. Edelstein 81, 53; J, Dubin 129, 40; C* 
Lawrence 124; I. F* Meyer 36, 56; C* Du Beau 
48, 39; *T. MeKenna 26, 39; A. Akhonin 56 
(Welcome! A fine start: one of the month's 
two best scores) ; G, Mott-Smith 53; W, R. 
Ellis 36; R* W, Hays 35; F, Grote 28; B. 
Clubb 27; T* L* Goddard 24; I. Hart 15; C, H* 
Godfrey 6; M W, Patz — ■; 9 W. O* Jens — . 


P* L. Rothenberg tops the Ladder this month 
lor the fifth time— thus outdistancing all other 
solvers — and Dr* Dobbs takes composing hon- 
ors for the quarter with his clever double- 
unpin two-ei\ No, 1600* To both, congratula- 
tions .! 


We have received so many requests for 
definitions of problem terms- — requests that 
cannot well be answered in these pages be- 
cause the material would have to be repeated 
every few months — that we are pondering the 
idea of getting up a short explanatory “dic- 
tionary” for problemists. How many readers 
of this column would be interested in paying, 
say, fifteen or twenty cents for a mimeo- 
graphed guide to the most common problem 
terms and outline of the best-known themes? 
If sufficient interest exists in such a project, 
we shall try to tackle it seriously. 


November, 1940 


189 


Original Section 


No. 1690 

CLAUDE DU BEAU 
Stockton, N. J. 

(After P. P. Blake) 



Mate In 2 


No r 1.6.91 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 



Mate in 2 


No. 1692 

NICHOLAS GABOR 
Cincinnati Ohio 



Mate in 2 


No. 1693 

BURNEY M. MARSHALL 
Shreveport, La. 



Mate in. 2 


No. 1694 

A. J. FINK 


San Francisco, Gal. 



Mate in 3 


No, 1695 
M, EDELSTEIN 
Somerville, Mass. 
Dedicated to H. C. Mo wry 



Mate in 3 


No, 1696 
H. C. MOWRY 
Maiden, Mass. 
Dedicated to M. Edelstein 



Mate in' 3 


No. 1697 

THOMAS S, McKENNA 
Lima, Ohio 



Mate in 3 


No, 1698 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N, Y. 



Mate in 3 


THESE PROBLEMS ARE SCORED ON THE SOLVERS’ LADDER. 
SOLUTIONS ARE DUE DECEMBER 15th, 1940. 












190 


The Chess Revikw 


Original Section (cont’d) 


No, 1699 

FRED SPRENGER 
New York, N, Y< 


No, 1702 (M) 

A t J, FIN K and UA TANE 

First Prize, Good 
Companions, 1920. 


No. 1705 (W) 

EL N, OFFCHlNNtKOFF 

First Prize, f '64Y 
1028 , 



Mate Jo 4. 



Mate in 2 Mate in 2 


No, 1700 (M) 

DR + M. NIEMEIJER 

Tijdschrift. v. d. Ned, 
Schaakbond, 1919, 



Mate in £ 


No. 1703 (M) 

A. ELLERMAN 
First Prize, Good 
Companions, 1920. 



Mate in 2 


No, 1.700 (M) 

R. RINDOIEN 

First Prize, 

Arbeidermaga&inet, 1933, 



Mate in 2 


No, 1701 (W) 

H. D'O, BERNARD 

First Prize, Mutate Tourney, 
Grantham Journal, 1028. 


No, 1704 (G) 

0. STOCC.H 3 

1934 , 





Mate in 2 Mate in 2 


No, 1707 (M) 

A. MARI 

1925. 



THESE PROBLEMS ARE SCORED ON THE SOLVERS' LADDER, 
SOLUTIONS ARE DUE DECEMBER 15th, 1940. 















November, l 9 4 0 


191 


No, 1.708 (G) 

L P A. 1SSAEFF 

First Prize, Trud, 1928. 



Mate in 2 


No, 1709 (Mi 
L. A. ISSAEFF 

Second Prize, 
FcMquier, 1929. 



Mate in 2 


No. 1710 (G, W) 

C. MANSFIELD 

First Prize, Rivlsta 
Roma.ua de Sail, 1931. 



Mate in 2 


Quoted Section 


No. 1711 (G-) 

R. BUCHNER 

First Prize, 

11 Problema, 1932. 



Mate in £ 


No. 171 2- (G) 

L + J. LOSCHINSKY 


First Prize, Smena, 1932 



Mate in. 2 


No. 1713 (M) 

(Setting created by the 
authors and other composers, 
on an idea illustrated as early 
as 1917 by G. F. Anderson/). 



Mate in 2 


No, 1714 (G) 

F. GAMAGE 

First Prize, Keeble 
Memorial Tourney, 1940. 



Mate in 2 


No, 1715 (W) 
L. SCHOR 
First Prise, Die 
Schwalbe, 1938, 



Mate in -.2 


No. 1716 (W) 

F. GAMAGE 

First Prize, C.C.jLA. 
Crosscheck Tourney, 1937-8, 



Mate in 2 


THESE PROBLEMS ARE NOT SCORED ON THE SOLVERS' LADDER. 



















192 


T h Jr Chess R e view 


Statement of the Ownership. Management, Circulation, etc,, required by the Acts of Congress of August 

24, 1912 and March 3, 1933. 

of The Chess Review, published monthly Oct, to May, and bi-monthly June to Sept., at 25 VV. 13rd JSt., 
New York Citv, N, Y.. lor Oct. 1, 194U* 

STATE OF NEW YORK. I 

COUNTY OF NEW YORK, J 

Before me, a Notary I'uhlic, in and for the State ami county aforesaid, personally appeared I. A, 
Hbrnwjt.z, who having been duly sworn according: to taw, deposes and says that he is the Editor of The 
Chess Review, and that, (he following is, to the besl of his knowledge and belief, a l rue statement of 
the ownership, management (and if a daily paper, the circulation), etc., of (he aforesaid publication for 
the d a t o &h o w n in the a b o ve ca pt Eon, requi rod b y t h e Act of August 21, 1912, as am en d e d h y the A c t 
of March 3. 1933, embodied in section 537, Postal .Laws and Regulations. printed on the reverse of this 
form, to Wit: 

t, Thai the names and addresses of the publisher, editor, managing editor, and business managers 
are: Publisher, I. A. Horowitz, 25 W. 43rd Hr.,, N. Y. C, r N. Y. : Editor: 1. A. Horowitz, 25 W, 4 3rd St.. 
N. Y. C., N. Y.; Managing Editor, T. A. Horowitz, 25 W, 43rd St,, X, Y, C., X. Y. : Business Manager: 


]. A. Horowitz, 25 W, 43rd Si., N, V, C., N. Y. 

2 r That, the owner is: Israel A. Horowitz, 25 VV, 43rd St., N, Y. C., N, Y. 

3, That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders owning or holding 1 per 
cent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities are: None. 

1, That the two paragraphs next above, giving the names of owners, stockholders, and security 
holders, if any, contain not only the list of stockholders and security holders as they appear upon the 
books of the company but also, in cases where the stockholder or security holder appears upon fhe 
books of the company as trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, Ihe name of the person or corpora- 
lion for whom such trustee is acting, is given; also that the said two paragraphs contain statements 
embracing aUlaiit'a full knowledge and belief as to the circumstances and conditions under which 
stockholders and security holders who do not appear upon the books of the company as trustees, hold 
stock and securities in a. capacity other than that of a bona tide owner; and this afTianl has no reason 
to believe that any other person, association, or corporation has any interest direct or indirect in the 
said stock, bonds, or other securities than as so stated by him. 

Hworn t.o rind subscribed before me this ISRAEL A. HOROWITZ (Editor) 

17 th day of October, 1510, DOROTHY COHEN, 

My commission expires April IS, 1941. (Com, of Deeds, N. Y, C.) 


COMMENTS ON MR, WHITE'S ARTICLES 

The essay by Mr, White is most instructive 
— Du Beau, This resume of the two-move 
problem is excellent and enjoyable. Can the 
same be done for the three-er? — Pat.x. A 
beautiful selection and a noteworthy delinea- 
tion of the problem’s progress- — McKenna, Ho 
freshing and delightful selection — Bur stein. 
Have certainly enjoyed reading Mr. White’s 
articles — Marshall, These arc swell problems, 
and the articles are very instructive — Lay. 
The problems are as fine a set as I have ever 
seen— Fader. A veritable treat, like re-reading 
Shakespeare. — Roth en berg. 


ENGLISH OPENING 
M, Haoauer H, Seidman 


White 


Black 


1 P-QB4 

P-K4 

15 Q-K1 

P-Q5 

2 Kt-QB3 

P-Q B4 

16 BxR 

QxB 

3 Kt-B3 

Kt-QB3 

17 Kt-Kt5 

P-R6 

4 P-K3 

KBB3 

18 R-B2 

B^K2 

5 P-Q4 

P-K5 

19 PxP 

Kt K5 

6 P-Q5 

PxKt 

20 B-K3 

B-R5 

7 PxKt 

KtPxP 

21 P-Q5 

BxRch 

3 QxP 

P-Q4 

22 BxB 

QxP 

9 PxP 

B-Kt5 

23 PxP 

KtxB 

10 Q-Kt3 

B-Q3 

24 QxKt 

BxP 

11 P-B4 

PxP 

25 R-K1 

Q-B3 

12 B~Kt5ch 

K-B1 

26 KtxP 

Q-Kt2 

13 0-0 

P-KR4 

27 QxPch 

K-Ktl 

14 B B6 

P-R5 

28 R-K8ch 

Resigns 



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REVIEW 


I. A. Horowitz 
h Kashdan 
Editors 


VoL VIII, No. 9 Published Monthly December* 1940 

Published bi-monthly June - September; published 
monthly October -May by THE CHESS Review* 25 
West 43rd Street, New York* N, Y. Telephone 
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the post office at New York* N. Y., under the Act 
of March 3, 1879.” 


Grand Tour 

As announced in our last issue* I. A. Horo- 
witz is all set to embark on his annual pilgrim- 
age, fully confident of covering more territory 
than ever before, His first stop is to be Ger- 
mantown, Pa, on January 1. Other definite 
dates are Plainfield, N, J. on the 4th, Hazleton, 
Pa, on the 6th, and Wilmington, Del, on the 
8th of the month* Philadelphia and Upper 
Darby* Pa, will be other points of call during 
that period. 

His route then calls for stops in Washington, 
D t C., West Virginia* Southern Ohio, Indiana* 
Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas, He should 
reach Los Angeles about February 1, and is 
due to remain a week in that metropolis. Then 
comes the long trek up the Pacific Coast to 
Seattle* Wash., and the return trip through the 
northern States, with occasional hops into 
Canada. New York and the New England 
States will be covered on his return, probably 
early in March, 

Horowitzs schedule is elastic enough to 
permit of the addition of new engagements at 
various points along the route. Clubs desiring 
his presence for simultaneous performances, 
lectures, etc., should write direct to The Chess 
Review. 


Another leading chessplayer has met with 
a serious automobile accident* Arthur W. Dake 
is laid up at the Sacred Heart Hospital in 
Eugene, Ore*, near his home in Portland. We 
have no details, but hope for a speedy and 
complete recovery* He would probably ap- 
preciate notes of encouragement from his many 
friends, and we suggest that our readers write 
to him* 


Metropolitan Notes 

The Marshall Chess Club is in the midst of 
a busy season. Preliminaries for both the men’s 
and women's championship tournament are 
under way. Frank Marshall is holding a 
weekly class of chess instruction, and other 
members are to lecture at intervals on various 
topics* Rapid transit tournaments and inter- 
club matches are regular features of interest. 


The championship tournament of the Mam 
hattan Chess Club started on December 2, with 
play scheduled for every Sunday. Arnold S. 
Denker, present champion, 1 is out to defend 
his title, but may encounter stern competition 
in the field of ten, which includes Albert S. 
Pinkus, Dr, J, Plata, J, Soudakoff, and club 
secretary L. Walter Stephens, 


RUSSIAN CHAMPIONSHIP 

The results of this tournament have just 
come to hand, replete with surprises, Bond- 
arevsky and Lilienthal shared the first honors, 
scoring ^^Yl-^Yz* Next came nineteen year 
old Smyslov, 13-6, and Keres, 12-7. Bot- 
winnik could do no better than tie for fifth 
and sixth with Boleslavsky, 11^-7^. Lcven- 
fisch, one of the older guard, who had hitherto 
been at or near the top* finished next to last 
in the strong field of twenty* Lilienthal was 
the sole competitor not to lose a single game. 
Both Keres and Botwinnik dropped four games, 
and evidently neither was dose to his best 
form. 

On another page we have an interesting 
article on the tournament, written shortly after 
the half-way mark. Two important games of 
the early rounds arrived as well, and we are 
promised several others annotated by the 


193 


194 


The C h e s s Review 


BRONX COUNTY TOURNEY 

Cad Pilnick, eighteen year old City College 
student, is the new Bronx County champion, 
winning the tournament held at the Empire 
City Chess Club with the decisive total of 9^2 
points out of ten games. Pilnick has only 
been playing chess for some two and onedialf 
years, and may well have a real career ahead 
of him. Following are the complete scores, 
and two games played in the tournament. 


C. Pilnick 

9V4 

N. Schwartz 

4 

M. Feldman 


A. N. Towsen 

3 

G. Heilman 

6% 

A. Friedman 

3 

Dr. L Farber 

a 

C, Basis _ 

3 

J, Feldman ,, 

5 

J. Chassan 

2% 

S, Kenigsberg 

5 




Aggressive tactics 

earn the victory „ 


BUDAPEST 

DEFENSE 


A. N. 

Towsen 

C. Pilnick 

White 

Black 


1 P-Q4 

Kt-KB3 

16 P*B4 

BxR 

2 P-QB4 

P-K4 

17 QxB 

Kt*B2 

3 PxP 

Kt*Kt5 

18 Kt-R4 

R-Q7 

4 P-K3 

KtxP(K4) 

19 BxB 

KxB 

5 Kt-KB3 

QKt-B3 

20 Q-K1 

Q-B3J 

6 Kt-B3 

P-Q3 

21 QxR 

QxRch 

7 B-K2 

P-KKt3 

22 K.Kt2 

R-K1 

8 P-QKt3 

B-Kt2 

23 B-B3 

R.K8 

9 B-Kt2 

0-0 

24 BxP 

R-KtBch 

10 0-0 

P-B4 

25 K-R3 

Q-Kt8 

11 Kt-Q4 

P-B5 

26 Q-Q4ch 

K-B1 

12 KtxKt 

PxKt 

27 B*K4 

Q-B8e h 

13 PxP 

RxP 

28 K-R4 

Q-K71 

14 P-KI3 

R-Q5J 

Resigns 


15 Q-K1 ? 

B-R6 



Simple but forceful play by the winner 


Bronx Championship 1940 


QUEEN’S GAMBIT DECLINED 


Dr. L 

Farber 

C. Rasis 

White 

Black 


1 P-Q4 

K1-KB3 

19 R-Q1 

QR-B1 

2 P-QB4 

P-K3 

20 P-KR3 

P-QK14 

3 K t-Q B3 

P-Q4 

21 B-R2 

RxR 

4 B-Kt5 

QKt-Q2 

22 QxR 

Q-K4 

5 P-K3 

B-K2 

23 Kt-K2 

Q-R4 

6 Kt-B3 

o-o 

24 Q-Q2 

P-Kt4 

7 R-B1 

P-B3 

25 Kt-Kt3 

Q-Kt3 

8 P-QR3 

R-K1 

26 Q-Q6 

B-B1 

9 B-Q3 

PxP 

27 R-Q4 

P-KR4 

10 BxP 

Kt-Q4 

28 KtxRP 

QxKt 

11 BxB 

QxB 

29 QxKt 

R-B1 

12 0-0 

KtxKt 

30 R-Q5 

K-R2 

13 RxKt 

P-K4 

31 RxKKtP 

Q-R3 

14 P-Q5 

PxP 

32 Q-K5 

P-B4 

15 BxP 

P-K5 

33 Q-K7ch 

K-R1 

16 Kt-04 

Kt-B3 

34 R-R5 

QxR 

17 B-B4 

P-QR3 

35 QxRch 

K-R2 

18 Q-B2 

B-Q2 

36 B-Kt8ch 

Resigns 


Book Review 

1940 VENTNOR CITY 
TOURNAMENT BOOK 

By Roy Dessauer St. 2 5 

The book of the latest Ventnor City Tour- 
nament has made an unusually prompt ap- 
pearance, in spite of evident care in preparation 
and editing. All the games are included, 
annotated by the participants in the tournament. 
R. W, Wayne of Ventnor City writes the 
foreword. 

The games are of uneven character, and 
there are occasional bad lapses, but a number 
of spirited and well-fought battles are thor- 
oughly worth playing oven Two examples, 
with notes from the book, are in our Games 
Section, 


CANADIAN CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 
Maurice Fox annexed the Canadian chess 
title, for his seventh victory in this event. He 
had little difficulty, drawing one game with D. 
LeDain, and winning eight, Montreal, where 
the tournament was staged, had a practical 
monopoly of the honors, the first three prizes 
going to residents. J. Rauch was second with 
7V 2 -ll/ 2 , and LeDain third 6y 2 - iy 2 , 

Toronto and Winnipeg were not represented, 
apparently because of the distance involved. 
Yet F, Yerhoff, champion of Saskatchewan, 
traveled 4000 miles to participate, and earned 
a good fourth with points. Next year’s 
tournament will be held at Winnipeg. 


The attention of our readers is called to a 
new chess game, "Blitz-krieg,” announced in 
this issue. Its sponsors tell us that this new 
game of wits permits lightning moves and 
daring attacks, and stimulates the mental pow- 
ers through the manoevering of pieces as in 
actual warfare. They are seeking agents among 
our readers for each city. 


Various news items and other features have 
been held over, due to the necessity of includ- 
ing our Annual Index, We expect to run a 
regular department on "Club Notes," and 
suggest that secretaries keep us informed of 
the activities of their organizations. 


REMEMBER TO . * , . 

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 


Correspondence Chess Tournament 


This is being written shortly after our No- 
vember issue was mailed out, so that we have 
little idea as yet as to the reaction of our read- 
ers to the Correspondence Tournament. We 
want to stress the fact that entries are being 
accepted now, and new sections will be formed 
as rapidly as players enroll. 

Two sections are already under way, with 
the following participants: 

SECTION I 

1, Hans Emmermann, Havana, Cuba 

2 , Hugh Noland, New Mexico 

3, Anton Linder, Erie, Pa. 

4, W, Julian James, Maryland 

5, N t W, Mitchell, Waterbury, Conn. 

SECTION II 

1. Anton Linder, Erie, Pa. 

2. Bernard Klein, New York City 

3. Waiter Muir, Schenectady, N. Y. 

4* J. M. Meeker, Danbury, Conn, 

5. Dr, H. C. Shepard, Montana 

For those who missed the announcement last 
month, here are the regulations for the tour- 
nament: 

Entrance fee— $1.00 per section. One entry 
tree to new subscribers and to present sub- 
scribers upon their next renewal The tour- 
nament is open to all, and players may enter 
as many sections as they please. 

Prizes — Orders on The Chess Review, $4.00 
for first prize, and $2.00 for second prize, in 
each section. These orders may be used for 
subscriptions, or the purchase of - books or 
merchandise at regular advertised rates. 

Sections will he composed of five players, 
each to play two games with every other. 
Complete scores of games are to be sent to 
us by the winners, and by the players of the 
White pieces in the ease of draws. 

The time limit for replies is 48 hours from 
the receipt of a move. IJndue delays may lead 
to forfeiture. Any questions regarding rules 
are to be submitted to us,' and our adjudica- 
tion is to be accepted as final, 

Mr. Anton Linder suggests that players be 
graded in sections, in accordance with their 
chess strength. We shall endeavor to do so, 
and suggest that entrants give us an idea as to 
their playing ability, and as to previous ex- 
perience in correspondence play. Any sug- 
gestions to improve the procedure and increase 
the interest of the tournament will be very 
welcome. 


Here are two further examples in correspond- 
ence chess, selected and annotated for us by 
Mr, Eldorous Dayton, 

Here we find a Queen going on an early 
excursion } with two Knights capering and pir- 
ouetting before, and a King who suffers from 
claustrophobia , 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 

(Notes by Eldorous Dayton) 


E. Dimock N. J. Hogenauer 


New London, 

Conn, 


New York City 

White 



Black 


T P- K4 

P-QB4 

5 

Kt-QB3 

P-Q3 

2 Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

6 

B-K2 

P-K Kt3 

3 P-Q4 

PxP 

7 

B-K3 

B-Kt2 

4 KtxP 

Kt-B3 

S 

KTKt3 

B-K3 

9 P-B4 


P-Q4 


Scarcely an 

improvement 

on 9 . . . 

O-O, as 

played by Botwinnik 

against Alekhine 

at Not- 

tingham, 1936. 

10 P-K5 

Kt-Q2 

13 

QxB 

PxP 

11 0-0 

P-B3 

14 

KtxP 

PxP 

12 B-Kt4 

BxB 

15 

QxBP 

■ 1 ■ M 


White has a tremendous position with threats 
against both KB 7 and QB7 + 


15 


QKt-K4 


Blocking both threats, but there are more 
to come. 


16 Kt-Q4 Kt-B4 

17 Kt-Kt5 1 Kt-K3 

18 Q-QR4 Kt-B3 

19 QR-Q1 Q-B1 


H ogenauer 



Dimock 


20 KtxKP! .... 

Down goes the front door! The Knight may 
not be captured, 

20 . . ( . Q-Ktl 

21 KtxKt PxKt 

22 Kt-Q6ch Resigns 

On 22- . .. . K-Ql, simply 23 QxBP. 


195 


1 96 


The Chess Review 


A whole army rushes pell me 1 1 through the 
narrow postern gate, 

RUY LOPEZ 


(Notes by Eldorous Dayton) 


N. Hernandez 

Tampa, Fla. 
White 

1 P-K4 

2 Kt-KB3 

3 B-Kt5 

4 BxKt 


J, McClure 

Nashville, Tenth 
Black 

P-K4 

Kt-QB3 

P-QH3 


Hernandez Ms almost exclusive patent rights 
to this continuation. 

4 . . . . QPxB 

5 Kt-B3 B KKtS 

f> P-KR3 BxKt 


No, no. Why give up the Bishop without 
obtaining some advantage thereby? 


7 

QxB 

Kt-B3 

12 

P-K Kt4 

Kt-Kt 

8 

P-Q3 

P-R3 

13 

Kt-Kt3 

P-KKt3 

9 

0-0 

B-Q3 

14 

K-Kt2 

B-K2 

10 

B-K3 

0-0 

15 

R-R1 

P-Kt3 

11 

Kt-K2 

K-R2 

16 

P-K R4 [ 

tiip 


As Pickett roared, “Come on, you so-and-so's, 
do you want to live for ever?” White now 
storms the Black position at terrific cost. 

16 . , . . BxP 

What else? Neither Pawn can advance to 
block the position, and White threatens P-Kt5 
and P-R5, 

17 RxB ! 

18 R-R1 

19 BxRP 
29 Q-K3 

If 20 . . , P-KKtl ; 21 RxKtch! 

21 QxKtch K-B3 24 R-R5! 

22 Kt-B5 Q-B4 25 Kt-Kt7 

23 P-Q4 [ PxP £6 P-Kt3 

The Queen is driven from the defense of the 

KBP, White now effects a turning movement 
and envelops the Black King, 

26 * , . . Q-Kt5 

27 R-B5ch K-K2 


R KKtl 
Q-B5 


QxR 

Q-K2 

KtxB 

K-Kt2 


McClure 



Hernandez 


28 Q-Kt5ch K-Q2 

28 , ♦ * K-Bl would set White a stiff er prob- 
lem. Best is 2!) Kt-K6ch, K-Kl; 30- KtxPch, 
K-Bl; 31 R-K5I QQ3; 32 Kt-K6ch!! (the point 
of Black's defense is that if 32 KtxR, P-B3! 33 
Q-RGch, K-R2, and White’s Rook has ten 
moves — all bad!) PxKt; 33 Q-EGch, K-Kl; 34 
RxPch wins. If in this variation 32 „ , , K-Kl; 
33 Q-B6! and still wins at least the Queen, 


29 

RxPch 

K-Bl 

30 

Kt-K6 

Q-Q3 

31 

KtxBP 

R-Ktl 

32 

P-K5 

Q-B4 

33 

P*Kt4 ! 

«I»P 


So if 33 . , . QxKtP; 34 KtxP s and Black has 
no saving check, 

33 ... . 

34 Q-K7 

35 K-Kt3 

36 P-B3 

37 P-QKt5 1 

Again cutting off the Black Queen’s com- 
munications. 


QxBP 

GbKSch 

Q-Q6ch 

R-QKt2 


37 ... . 

38 Q-K6ch 

39 KtxPch 

40 QxBP 


R-Q1 

K-Ktl 

K-R1 

Resigns 


PUT NEW MEANING AND 
PLEASURE IN 

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THE CHESS REVIEW 

25 West 43rd Street : New York, N, Y. 



The Moscow Chess Tournament 

By I. L Maizelis 


The greatest chess event of this troubled 
year in Europe, after the sensational victory of 
Paul Keres, the Estonian chess master, over 
Dr, Euwe, the ex-world champion, is undoubt- 
edly the U S, S* R, championship tournament 
of 1940, played in Moscow from September 5 
to October 3. The list of those taking part in 
it is an impressive one. It includes two candi- 
dates for world championship, Botwinnik and 
Keres; three grandmasters, Lilienthal, Levem 
hsch and Kotov; the well-known Makagonov, 
Ragosin, Konstantinopolsky, Petrov and Miken- 
as, who have defeated some of the most promi- 
nent foreign players; and ten other noted 
Russian masters. 

The tournament is followed with tremendous 
interest, not only in Moscow but far beyond 
its confines. The telegraph and wireless re- 
port every new development. The general 
opinion is that it will be a dual for premier 
honors between Botwinnik and Keres. The 
exploits of these two young chess masters in 
international competition are widely known. 
Both are regarded as candidates, on an equal 
footing with the American masters, Reshevsky 
and Fine, for the title of world champion, 

Botwinnik, aged twenty-nine, is not a chess 
professional. As an electrical engineer, he is 
engaged on very important scientific work in 
the Leningrad Industrial Institute. Quite re- 
cently he obtained his degree as candidate of 
Technical Science, Botwinnik’s play is dis- 
tinguished by great finish and sureness. He 
is always extremely thorough in his prepara- 
tions for tournaments, both from the purely 
scientific point of view and for the sake of the 
game. He conveys the impression of a first- 
rate competitor who knows wherein his own 
strength lies and keeps himself well in hand, 

Keres is not a professional either. Only 
twenty-four, he is a student in the mathemati- 
cal faculty of the Tartu University (Estonia), 
and very keen on games. Just before entering 
the chess tournament he competed for the ten- 
nis championship of Estonia, An amazingly 
gifted chess player, it is difficult at the present 
time to foresee his possibilities. He has always 
had plenty of admirers, but now that the Mus- 
covites have come to know him better, the 
number of his -well-wishers shows a consider- 
able increase. He Is very modest and has little 
to say for himself, but the sly twinkle in his 
eye betrays a lively temperament and love of a 
joke. 


After the first round, when the "three 
Baltic musketeers,” as Keres, Petrov and Mi- 
kenas are called, returned to supper at their 
hotel, the conversation turned on the early days 
of Keres 5 chess-playing career. 

Do you remember those lessons in chess I 
gave you ten years ago, Paul?” Mikenas asked. 

"Oh, yes,” Keres replied complacently, "but 
fortunately I didn't learn anything from you.” 

Perhaps it was this good-humored, but never- 
theless pointed retort, that prompted the Lithu- 
anian champion to give Keres another "lesson.” 
At all events, during their encounter in the 
ninth round he played to win with great 
energy and even sacrificed a piece. His system 
proved to be incorrect, but the game still 
ended in a draw. Be that as it may, Mikenas 
might well be proud of a pupil like Keres! 

Although both matadors, Botwinnik and 
Keres, are indisputably the greatest favorites, 
no one would go so far as to assert that they 
are bound to gain the two first places.. The 
other eighteen participants are obviously going 
to show some interesting play. It must not be 
forgotten that the tournament is taking place 
in the U, S, S. R., where more first-rate masters 
can be found than in all the other countries 
of Europe taken together. 

The progress of the tournament is thrilling. 
In the first round, Botwinnik was defeated 
by Bondarevsky, the talented Rostov player. 
Keres was placed in a very unpleasant position 
by another Rostov man, eighteen-year-old Stol- 
berg, the youngest participant in the tourna- 
ment. He has only just left school this year. 
But the youngster made a bad mistake and 
Keres managed to extricate himself and win 
the game. An incident of this kind might 
unnerve an even more experienced player, but 
not S to I berg! What did this amazingly cool 
and assured youth with the wild locks and 
enormous spectacles (balanced with difficulty 
on a very small nose) do but calmly win his 
next four games, and at the end of the fifth 
round, gain the leadership of the tournament 
on an equal footing with Bondarevsky and 
Makagonov! 

The onslaught of the young chess masters 
in the first five rounds proved extremely dis- 
concerting to the grandmasters. Besides the 
above-mentioned defeat of Botwinnik, Keres 
lost two games to Makagonov and Veressov, 
through attempting to win in positions where 


197 


198 


The Chess Review 


such efforts were fool-hardy, Levenfisch also 
lost two games, and Kotov all five! 

"The result of the first round/’ wrote Salo 
FIohr, who attended the tournament as a 
journalist, "is that three of the five grand- 
masters have not returned to their base." 

After a day s interval, when the players had 
time to rest, the second quarter of the tour, 
n ament began. Botwinnik set to work on 
improving his position. He showed some 
brilliant work in winning from Petrov, the 
Latvian champion, and Stolherg, one of the 
leaders. In the latter game and the one against 
Levenfisch in the fourth round, Botwinnik was 
unusually strong. It is interesting to note that 
against Levenfisch he used a variation that he 
had specially prepared for an important mo- 
ment, and kept in reserve, a secret, for six 
years. It is a valuable theoretical novelty and 
at the end of the game, Levenfisch declared 
that he had suffered for the glory of the theory 
of openings, Botwinnik was less successful 
in his game against Ragozin, in which lie saved 
himself by the skin of his teeth and brought the 
game to a draw. 

Keres, who had rather disappointed his pub- 
lic at the opening of the tournament, now be- 
gan to show his style. The way he defeated 
Lisitsin was very beautiful to observe, and his 
game with Konstantinopolsky is, in the opinion 
of a connoisseur like Flohr, a genuine master- 
piece of the art of chess playing. 

After being defeated by Bondarevsky, as 
well as Botwinnik, Stolberg lost his position 
as one of the leaders, and retired to the back- 
ground. Makagonov, who maintained his place 
near the lead, is a cool and very sure player, 
He has been nicknamed "Makagonov IV/ 1 
In recognition of his faculty for gaining the 
fourth place in a number of the big tourna* 
meets held in recent years. He has long en- 
joyed the reputation of a steady, cautious mas- 
ter, not given to exhibitions of unusual initia- 
tive or originality. His "protective armor" has 
been still further strengthened of late. In fact, 
Levenfisch declares that Makagonov is a com- 
plete ferro-concrete fortification. 

At the end of the ninth round Bondarevsky 
was leading with seven points. In that round 
his play was superlative. True, some doubted 
his ultimate victory and recalled other occa- 
sions when, after a brilliant opening, he would 
give ground at the dose. Still, that is all 
talk, and nothing more, Bondarevsky is a 
first-rate player with a fine style of attack, 
and will undoubtedly put up a good fight 
for first place right up to the end of the tour- 
nament. 


Although the rising generation of chess 
masters caused their elders some very unpleas- 
ant moments at the beginning of the tourna- 
ment, there was a turn in the tide after the 
ninth rounds when the systematic and concen- 
trated efforts of the grandmasters began to 
tell. In the tenth round Bondarevsky lost for 
the first time, to Ragozin, Makagonov lost to 
Lilienthal, and now Botwinnik, Keres, Li Hen- 
thal and Bondarevsky are firmly established in 
the group of leaders. After them come Ma- 
kagonov and Ragozin. 

Only two remain who have not known de- 
feat as yet, Lilienthal, and the nineteen -year-old 
Moscow chess master, Smyslov. But it is very 
unlikely that they will be able to keep that 
record intact to the end. 

The strength of the participants is dearly 
shown by the fact that Petrov and Mikenas, 
players of solid European reputation, keep in 
the middle ranks throughout. The eldest of 
the entries, Levenfisch, who was born in 1889, 
is evidently no longer able to stand the strain 
of a prolonged battle. 

The struggle for leadership is entering on 
the last, decisive phase, and the interest of the 
spectators crowding the Great Hall of the 
Moscow Conservatoire (which accomodates 
2 500 people) is at boiling point. Colored sig- 
nal lights flash out on the big wall-boards: 
"White to move/ 1 "Black to move," "Black 
resigns," "White resigns,” or "Draw.” Those 
who are demonstrating the moves on the stage 
are all highly qualified players, candidates for 
the title of chess master. They have evidently 
resolved to follow in the footsteps of Reuben 
Fine, the great American master, who began 
his public chess career as a demonstrator at 
the All-American tournament held in New 
York in 1931. 

Every day, after each round, a special bul- 
letin is issued. It contains all the games 
played in the round, as well as articles, photo- 
graphs and other material. The correspondents 
of all the papers work in a press-bureau spe- 
cially arranged for them. A tournament for 
correspondents alone might be organized, and 
the entry list would prove to include a great 
many very strong players. 

The nineteen rounds will be over soon. 
It is a long stretch. The final victory will 
be won by whoever possesses to the greatest 
degree outstanding ability at the game, com- 
bined with endurance and the spirit that holds 
on to the end. Physical and moral endurance, 
strong, steady nerves — all qualities of the ut- 
most importance in our day— these will deter- 
mine the outcome of the tournament. 


D E C ii MBliR, 19 4 0 


199 



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RUSSIAN CHAMPIONSHIP, MOSCOW, 1940 

UPPER ROW. left to right: L V, RAGOSIN; 2. The winners — I , BONOAREVSKY, V, SMYSLOV, and 
A. L! LIEMTHAL; 3. GERSTENFELD and PETROV analysing, with STOLBERG- FLOHR, and KERES 
looking on. CENTER ROW: 1. BOTWINNIJK and KERbS, the p re -tournament favor ites; 2 . PETROV 
and LILfENTHAL, LOWER ROW: 1. General view of the Tournament Hall; 2. MIKENAS, also known 
as "Mickey^ Mouse:" 3, The playing platform and the illuminated demonstration boards. 











By Reuben Fine 


(This is the just of a series of Best Games 
by the leading American masters , The game 
teas an important victory for Pine in the A , 
V. R> 0 - Tournament in Holland , perhaps the 
greatest chess even! of all time. It will be 
remembered that Fine tied with Keres for first 
prize . The game has already appeared, bat 
Fine s illuminating notes are presented for the 
fust time.) 

Holland, November, 1938 
(Notes by Reuben Fine) 

FRENCH DEFENSE 


R . Fine 

While 


S* Flohr 

Black 


1 P-K4 P K3 4 P‘K5 P-QB4 

2 P^G4 P^G4 5 B-Q2 Kt-K2 

3 KUQB3 B-Kt5 6 Kt-S3 Kt B4? 

A weak move which is the cause of all 
Black’s troubles. Where White, as in this 
variation of the French Defense, has strong 
Pawns at Q4 and K5, it is imperative for 
Black to break up this formation at the earliest 
possible moment, since the Pawn at K5 se- 
verely cramps Black's game, Of the various 
ways in which this can be done, the simplest 
is II , , , QKt-B3, when the best continuation 
for both sides is 7 Kt-QKt.5, BxUch; 8 QxB, 
KtxQP; Si QKtxKt (9 Kt-Q^ch leads to nothing), 
PxKt; 10 QxP T O-O; 11 B-Q3, P-B3. with an 


even game. 


7 PxP ! 

To take immediate advantage of the unfor- 
tunate position of Black s Kt. For the next 
moves White concentrates on simple develop- 
ment of his pieces, while Black, as will be 
seen, cannot follow suit, but must attend to 
a number of minor threats which keep retard- 
ing his game, 

7 . , . . BxP 

8 B-Q3 , , ♦ , 

Threat: 9 UxKt, PxB; 10 13-KI5, PB3; 11 
PxP, PxP; 12 MU, and Black’s ruined Pawn 
position wilt be fatal. 


8 , . . . Kt-R5 

There is a rule that one should never move 
a piece more than once in the opening, and 
this game is a vivid example of why obedience 
is the better part of chess valor. Every time 
Black's Kt moves his position gets worse. 



REUBEN FINE 


Further unavoidable loss of time, IQ . . . 
0 0 is impossible because of the mating at- 
tack beginning with 11 BxPch! KxB ; 12 Kt- 
KtSch. If then 12 . . . K Ktl ; 13 QRf>, R-K1 ; 
14 QxPch, KR1; 15 G-Roeh, and male in 
three, while if 12 , . . K-K13 ; 13 Q-Ktl wins at 
least the Queen. 

Now White has a clear advantage* He has 
more pieces developed, they are more effec- 
tively posted, and control more space. But 
there is nothing lasting about this superiority, 
and if Black should succeed in castling and 
getting his QB out it will be completely dis- 
sipated, So the problem for White is to force 
some concrete and permanent weakness in 
Black’s position, and in chess, as in war, the 
most effective method of crippling an opponent 
is by attack. 

How and where should the attack begin? 
The answer to tins question is determined by 
the observation that the trouble with an un- 
developed position (such as Black’s here) is 
that the action of the pieces is uncoordinated, 
and it is difficult to find a safe spot for the 
King. Hence one must try to concentrate as 
much force as possible against. t.be most vul- 
nerable point in Lbe opponent’s armor- — here 
the King position. And to get this force in 
place one must keep old roads clear and open 
new ones. 

Since a si i on g center Pawn is always a 
serious obstacle to an attack. White's im- 
mediate plan in this case reduces to the simple 
one of getting rid of Black’s QP. This ex- 
plains the idea behind his next few moves, 
which are directed at making P-QTM possible, 

11 Kt-R4 . , ( . 

Gaining an important tempo for the advance 
of the QBP. 


9 0-0 


KUB3 


11 


B-B1 


IQ R’KI .... 

Useful development which defends the KP 
soon to become the pivot of White’s attack. 

IQ , . , . P’K R3 


This is certainly an unappetizing square for 
Use harassed prelate, but it is difficult to find 
a better one. On 1 L . . . B-K2; 12 KtxKt, 
RxKi; 13 Q-KU forces . . . K-Bl, and Black 
will not be able to castle; while n . * . B-K 1 3 


200 



December, 19 4 0 


201 


is met by 12 KtxB, PxKt; 13 KtxKt, QxKt; 
14 P-QB4 [ PxP ; 15 RK4! and Black is no 
nearer a solution ol f his difficulties, 

12 R-QB1 .... 

12 P-B4 is not good immediately, since the 
QB is unprotected after 12 . , . KtxKtch; 13 
QxKt, PxP + 12 KtxKt, QxKt; 13 P-QB4 could 
have been played, but since there is no hurry 
■ — there is no way to prevent the execution of 
White's plan— he prefers to get his other Rook 

into the game. The principle that White is 
following is that one should always use as 
many pieces as possible in the attack. 

12 ... . B-Q2 

Playing for a trap: 13 . . . KtxKtch; 14 
QxKt, KtxP; 15 RxKt, BxKt, and Black has 
won a Pawn, But the trap, as is generally 
the case, is easily avoided and the move turns 
out to be worse than useless, since it involves 
a further congestion of Black's King position. 
It would have been much better t.o develop 
the KB by ... . P-KK13 and , . . B-Kt2, fol- 
lowed by castles, when he would at any rate 
have had a fighting chance. 

13 KtxKt QxKt 

14 P-QB4 PxP 

15 RxP Q-Q1 


Flohr 



Fine 


White has achieved the objective outlined 
above. Mow the problem is how to use his 
aggressive position to force some real weak- 
nesses, since Black's formation is still organi- 
cally sound and suffers only from a backward 
development. And the answer is a direct attack 
against the King— justified by the lack of ade- 
quate defense. From here on every White 
move involves a direct threat Black manages 
to “defend himself for a while, but it is like 
fighting tanks with bare hands. The combined 
pressure of all of White's pieces is irresistable 
with both of Black’s Rooks helpless spectators, 

16 Q-RS! 

Threat No. 1: 17 R-E4 and if 17 . , , Q-K2; 
IS RxP! QxR; 19 E-Kt6, winning the Queen, 
IS ■ ♦ - P‘KKt3 would not do, since White can 
reply simply 17 RxKtP, PxB; 1,8 QxPch, K-K2; 
19'Q-B6ch, followed by QxR. 

16 . . .. , Kt-K2 

To be able to answer 17 R-B4 bv , , P- 
KKt3, 

17 R-Q4 


Threat No. 3: To win a piece by 18 Kt-B5, 
for if then 18 . , . Kt-Q4 ; 19 RxKt, FxR; 20 
P-K6! and Black is helpless. 

17 . . . . P-KKt3 

18 Q-B3 Q-B2 

19 Kt-B3 

Threat No. 3: 30 Kt-K4 and check either at 
Q6 or B6 will be conclusive, 

19 ... . . Kt-B4 

The best chance. There is no really adequate 
defense. 

20 Kt-Kt5! .... 

The beginning of the end. After the neces- 
sary preliminaries, the decisive step in a direct 
attack is a sacrifice which draws the King .into 
an exposed position — always fatal in the mid- 
dLe game when few pieces have been ex- 
changed. 

20 ... . Q-Kt3 

Tactical considerations are paramount here. 
If 20 . . . Q-B3; 21 QxQ, PxQ (not 21 . , , 
BxQ; 22 Kt-B7ch, K-K2; 23 B-Et4ch) 22 Kt- 
B7ch, K-Q 1 ; 23 BxKfc, KxKt; 24 B-R5ch t K-Bl; 
25 KRQ1, KtPxB; 26 RxB, B-B4; 27 R-E7ch, 
K-Ktl; 28 RxBP, and Black's game is hopeless, 

£1 RxB! KxR 

22 P-K Kt4 Kt R5 

On 22 . . . Kt-K2; 23 QxBP, R-KKtl; 24 
E-K3, Q-B3; 25 R-Ql would win quickly. 

23 QxBPch B-K2 

24 B-Kt4 

The only winning continuation. On 24 B-K3? 
KR-B1 would give Black adequate counter- 
play because of the possibility of . . . Kt-B6ch. 

24 ... . QR-K1 

25 BxB RxB 

26 Q-B6 .... 

Attacking both the KR and Kt and winning 
at least a piece. White can now win as he 
pleases, 

26 T , , , P-R3 

£7 R-Q11 

The simplest, 

27 ... . PxKt 

28 B-K4ch Resigns 

For if 28 . , . K-B2; 29 QxKR, R-Q2; 30 R- 
Blch wins the Queen, 


CHESS LESSONS 

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202 


The Chisss Review 


Selected Games 


Annotations, unless otherwise credited \ are 
by L Kashdan. 

Correspondence Tournament 
Australia, 1940 

The Aussie s have no time to develop their 
Rooks } so White gives away a couple. 

QUEEN'S KNIGHT'S OPENING 


A, E, Nield 


H, Edwards 


White mack 

1 Kt-QB3 P-QB4 

2 P-Q4 

Z P-K4 would transpose to the Sicilian De- 
fense. The text loses time, and should offer 
Black no difficulty. 


2 , 

3 GxP 

4 Q-QR4 

5 B-B4 


PxP 

K1-QB3 

P-Q4 

P-B3? 


Too ambitious. The formation after . . . 
P-K4 looks very promising, but Black never 
accomplishes it. Better was 5 , . * B-Q2. It 
then 6 KtxP? P-K4; 7 B-Kt3 f Kt-Q5S wins. 

6 Q-O-O! P-K3 

Sad but necessary; If t> , , * P-Q5; 7 P-K3, 
P-K4; S PxP! PxB; ll P-Q5, with a winning 
game. 

7 P-K4 P-Q5 

8 Kt-B3 B-B4 

P-K4 still would not do, for 9 KtxQP! PxKt; 
10 Kt-Kt5 gives White a powerful attack* 


9 P-Q Kt4 ! 


Starting a grand combination, reminiscent 
of the Anderssen-Kiesentzky game of the 
“good old days" of chess. 

9 . . . , BxP 

10 KtxP BxKt 

11 KtxKt B-Kt7ch 

12 KxB QxR 


Edwards 



Nield 


13 B-QKt5!l 

Much the best, as Black must accept the 
second Rook, and draw his Queen out of range. 
If 13 Kt Koch, K-B1; 14 B-QKtG, Q-Ql! and 
Black has sufficient defense. 


13 , . . . QxR 

14 Kt-K5ch K*B1 

If 14 ... K-Ql there is a problem-like finish, 
15 Kt-B7ch, K-K2; 16 B-QGch! KxKt; 17 B-K8 
mate. 

15 Q-Q4! B-Q2 

If 15 . , . PxKt White mates in three with 
1(> Q-Q8ch, K-B2 ; 17 B-KSch, K-Bl; IS B*Kt6. 
The text might have been omitted. 

16 QxB Resigns 

Mate must follow after 16 , . , PxKt; 17 
BxP, Kt-K2; IS B-Q6, 


From a match which Spiel maun won 5 ^-^. 
The old maestro in his best attacking vein , 

1st Match Game, Stockholm, 1940 
ALBUM COUNTER GAMBIT 


S, Lundholm 

White 

1 P-Q4 P-Q4 

2 P-QB4 P-K4 

3 PxKP P-Q 5 

7 P-QK14 


R. Spiclmann 

Black 

4 Kt-KB3 Kt-Q B3 

5 QKt-Q2 B-K3 

6 P-QR3 Q-Q2 


There is time for this. Better is 7 P-KKtS, 
KKt-K2; S Q-E-lp Kt-Kt3; 9 B~Kt2, followed by 
0-0 and then P-QKU. Black cannot regain 
the Pawn without seriously weakening his 
position. 

7 , , . . KKt-K2 

8 B-Kt2 Kt-Kt3 

9 R-B1 , , . , 


Protecting the BP, and planning Kt-Kt3. 
But he is rudely surprised. 

9 . . . , P-QR4I 

Weakening White's Q side, with results that 
will soon be evident. But not 9 . . . KKlxP; H> 
BxP! retaining the Pawn plus. 

10 P-Kt5 QKtxP 


Now if 11 BxP, KtxKt ch ; 12 KtxKt, BxRP, 
and if 11 KtxP, BxRP; 12 KtxE? QxKt; 13 
BxB?? Kt-Q6 mate! 

11 P*Kt3 KtxKtch 

12 KtxKt B-QB4 

13 P-KR4 .... 


If 13 KtxP, R-Q; and White is under lasting 
pressure. The developing 13 B-Kt2 was pre- 
ferable, as the text hardly helps matters, 

13 , , , , Q*Q3 

14 B-K12 R-Q1 

Stronger than 11 . . . BxP; 15 QxB; 

16 0-0! when White would get the initiative. 

15 0*0 0-0 

16 Q-Q3 P-B4 

This Pawn is destined to go far. White’s 
position is soon badly smashed. 


17 

P-R5 

Kt*K2 

18 

QR-Q1 

P*B5 

19 

KtxP 

h i # 1 

There is 

nothing better. 

If 19 Kt*Kt5 

1$ 

<■ -1 P ■ 

PxP 

20 

KtxB 

PxPch 

Cl 

K-m 

QxKt 

22 

Q-KK13 

■ nil 


D liCEMBliR, 19 4 0 


203 


At least he has some threats, 22 QxR offers 
little hope, as the White King remains too 
exposed* 

22 ... . Kt-B4 

23 Q-Kt4 QxKP! 

The conception is considerably deeper than 
the apparent 24 QxQ? Kt-Kt6ch. Black gives 
up the exchange, but remains with an over- 
whelming superiority in position. 


Spielmarm 



Lund holm 


8 ... . Kt-K5 

9 0-0 . . . . 


9 BxKt was what worried me. For instance; 
9 BxKt, PxB; 10 Kt-KtS, P*B4; 11 Q-Kt3, P-K3; 
12 FxPI But Black can safely play 10 * . . 
PxP! 11 KPxP, Q-Q4, etc. 

9 . . . . B-B4 

10 B-B2 .... 

To protect it and permit B-Q2. 


10 ... . 00 

11 R-Q2 P*B3 

Declaring his intention of at once advancing 
in the center* But Stephens counters this 

idea with energetic measures and finally pre- 
vents it altogether* 

12 Kt-R4 K^RI 15 BxKt BPxB 

13 KtxB PxKt 16 Kt-Kt3 P*K3 

14 B-K 1 R-KKtl 17 Kt-R5 Kt-K2 

18 P-KKt4 .... 


Stephens has been 
fearlessly. 

18 ... * QR-KB1 

19 B-Kt3 P-B4 

20 P-Kt5 P-Kt3 


playing strongly and 


21 K-B2 Kt-B3 

22 P-KR4 PxP 

23 KPxP P-Kt4! 


The well-known “minority’* attack (P-K15 
etc.)* 

24 P Kt4 


24 B-05ch RxB 

Not 24 . . . K'Rl ? 25 BxPchi KtxB; 26 QxQ 
wins. 

25 QxQ Kt-Kt6ch 

26 K-Kt2 KtxQ 

27 PxR Kt-B5ch 

2$ K-Kt3 .... 

If 2S K-R2, B-Q3 ; 29 K-Rl, R-E 1 ; 30 RxP, 
RxPch at least regains the exchange, with 
an easy win* 

28 . . . . KtxPch 

29 K-R4 R-B5chl 

30 KxKt 

Now he is mated, but if 30 K-R3, P-Kt4 and 
White is helpless. 

30 ... . B-K2 

31 R-KR1 P-Kt3ch 

32 K-R6 R~B4 

Resigns 


Ventnor City, 1940 

An open file for a piece, and it turns out all 
right this time , 

stonewall system 

(Notes by A. E. Santasiere) 

L. W. Stephens A. E. Santasiere 

White Black 


Merely creating new weaknesses, He should 
have played 24 KtxB and P-R5, 

24 ... . R-B1 

25 Q-Q2 .... 

The last chance for KtxB. Now Black, 
rather than allow the exchange, makes a prom* 
ising sacrifice of the Bishop, the outcome being 
by no means certain. 


Santasiere 



Stephens 


25 ... . BxPchl ? 28 Q-K3 KR-QB1 

26 PxB KtxKtP 29 KR-B1 Q-B3 

27 K-Ktl R-B7 30 R-Ql Q^B5 


1 P-Q4 

2 P-K3 

3 B-Q3 

4 Kt-Q2 


KLKB3 
P KKt3 
P-Q4 
B Kt2 


5 P-KB4 

6 P-B3 

7 QKLB3 
3 Kt K2 


P-B4 

Q-Q3 

Kt-B3 


The opening has not been conducted along 
usual lines. Now Black must play . . * Kt-K5 
at once or suffer the consequences of 9 Kt-Kt3. 
The decision was not an easy one and took 
almost 30 minutes. 


Black has two and may have three Pawns 
for the piece. Further, he dominates the Q 
side. But he has no winning combination 
in sight, much as he tries to manufacture one. 
Meanwhile, if White can reorganize his K 
side forces and get them into motion, he can 
cause all kinds of trouble. 

31 B-B2 R-B6 

32 Q-Q2 Kt-Q6 




204 


The Chess Review 


33 B-K3 P-K t5 

34 Q-KKt2 . , . . 

Now the strong threat- (after K-Rl) is P-Kt6. 

34 ... . R’B7 

35 R-Q2? . . . * 

This hasty move loses the game at once. 
Correct was 35 Q-Kt3! continuing the threat 
of P-Kt6. Black would then be wise to switch 
over to the defense temporarily, 1. e. 35 Q-Kt.3, 
Q-B2! 33 K-Rl, Q-B2; 37 Kt-BS, P-KR4!, fol- 
lowed by . . . K-Kt2 and KL3. 


35 ... . 

R.BSch 

43 K-K1 

P-Kt6 

36 RxR 

QxRch 

44 K-Q1 

P-Kt7 

37 K-R2 

Kt-K3 

45 K B2 

PxB (Q) eh 

38 Q-K2 

Kt B6ch 

46 KxQ 

P-K6 

39 K-Kt2 

KtxR 

47 K-Q1 

P- R4 

40 BxKt 

R-B7 

48 Kt-Kt3 

P-R5 

41 BxQ 

RxQch 

49 Kt-K2 

RxKt 

42 K-B1 

RxP 

Resigns 



This game won the first brilliancy prize, 
donated and awarded by the victim — a gesture 
of true sportsmanship. 


Ventnor City, 1940 

Lack of development is fatal f as oft before, 

N I MZOVITCH DEFENSE 


(Notes by W. W. Adams) 


W, W, Adams 

White 

1 P-K4 

2 Kt-QB3 


P. Woliston 
Black 
Kt-QB3 


Stronger than. 2 P-Q4 at once because Black’s 
answer 2 , . . F-Q4 results in the easy develop- 
ment of his QB + 


2 , Kt-B3 

Ail idea said to have been originated by 
Breyer in a game against Euwe some fifteen 
years ago, 

3 P Q4 P-K4 

4 PxP QKtxP 

5 P-B4 Kt-B3 

6 P-K5 Kt-KKtl 

7 Kt-B3 .... 


In the game referred to, Euwe played 7 
B-B4, and there followed 7 . . . P-Q3; 8 Kt-BB, 
B-Kt5; 9 O-O, BxKt; 10 QxB, PxP, winning a 
Pawn, since White cannot recapture because 
of . . . Q-Q5ch. The text reserves the option 
of B-Kt5, a stronger post than B4 for this 
piece in case Black plays 1 . . . P-Q3. 


7 ■ . ■ ■ 

8 B-Kt5 

9 P-KR3 
10 0-0 


P-Q3 11 Q-K1 

B-Kt5 12 PxP 

B-Q2 13 K-Rl 

K t- R 3 14 Kt-K4 


PxP 
B-B4ch 
Kt B4 


An alternative was 14 BxKt, but why give 
up a perfectly good B for a very unhappy .Kt? 


14 . . . . B-K2 

15 B-K15 


In most positions in which the opponent 
suffers from a congestion of his pieces, the 
first player does well to avoid exchanges, but 
in the present position White felt that rapid 
development was the more important con- 
sideration. 


15 , , . . BxB 

16 KKtxB 0-0 


17 R-Q1 Q-K2 

18 BxKt . , . * 

In order to prevent KKt-Q5 in answer to 
P-KKt4. 


IB ... . PxB 

19 P-KKt4 Kt-R3 

20 Q-R4 QR-Q1 


Woliston 



Adams 


21 Kt-B6ch! K-Rl 

22 Kt ( Kt5) x R P P-B4 

In the forlorn hope of a perpetual check, but 
there is nothing to be done in any case, 

23 KtxR B-B3ch 

24 K-Ktl RxR 

25 RxR QxP 

26 Kt-Kt6ch ! Resigns 


U, S. S, R, Championship 
Moscow* Sept, 8* 1940 
ENGLISH OPENING 


(Notes by Salo Flohr) 

M* Botwinnik G* Levonfisch 

White Black 


1 

P-QB4 

P-K4 

7 E3-R4 

BxKtch 

2 

Kt-QB3 

KLKB3 

8 PxB 

Kt-K4 

3 

Kt-B3 

Kt-B3 

9 PK3 

Kt- Kt3 

4 

P-Q4 

PxP 

10 BKt3 

Kt-K5 

5 

KtxP 

B-Kt5 

11 Q-B2 

KtxB 

6 

B-Kt5 

P-KR3 

12 RPxKt 

P-Q3 


Up to this move the players have followed 
an explored line. This position was encountered 
for the first time in the game between Bot- 
winnink and Nenarokov, Leningrad, 19.33. N e li- 
ar ok ov originated the system of moves 8 > * , 
Kt-K4 and 9 . t . Kt-Kt3 ? which have been 
considered quite playable for Black, In the 
above-mentioned game Botwinnik played 13 
B-K2, when Black, with . * , Kt-K4, can bring 
the poorly placed Knight into good action. 
Levenfisch vs, Botwinnik, Leningrad, 1934, took 
a similar course, and here too White obtained 
no advantage whatever. In the present game* 
the situation is exactly the same as six years 
ago, except that the colors are reversed. Bot- 
winnik had evidently analysed the opening in 
great detail, and at last had the opportunity 
to make use of the strengthening manoevre 
he had found for White, 

13 P-B41 ... * 


December, i 9 4 0 


205 


This is the improvement, over the previous 
play. The purpose of the move is clear: he 
prevents Black's Knight from occupying K4, 
gains a secure square for his King at B2, and 
prepares for an advance on either wing. 

13 ... . Q-K2? 

Surprised by Botwinnik's new move, Leven- 
fisch is troubled and does not find a good reply. 
The Queen is badly placed on K 2 and is sub- 
sequently driven away with a loss of tempo. 
Correct 'was the immediate 13 * . . Kt-Bl, to be 
followed by . , . Kt-KS, after which a real 
struggle might have taken place. Now White 
soon obtains a decisive advantage, 

14 K-B2 Kt-Bl 

11; 14 * . . B-Q2, 15 B-Q3 and B-K4, .with a 
bind on tlie position. 


Lcvenfisch 



Botwinnik 

15 PQB5I1 .... 

A quite unexpected sacrifice at such an early 
phase of the game, 

15 ... . PxP 

If now 15 . . . B-Q2; 16 FxP t and Black must 
capture with the Pawn, since if 16 . , . QxP; 
17 Q-K4ch and 18 QxP, After 16 PxP h PxP, 
Black’s isolated Pawn on Q3 is a serious weak- 
ness, and the post of the White Knight on Q4 
is even more dominant. 

16 B-Kt5ch Kt*Q2 

Black’s position is difficult. It is obvious that 
16 . . . P-B3 will not do because of 17 KtxP. 
After 16 . . . B-Q2 follows 17 Kt-B5, Q-B3; 18 
Q-K4ch and QxP, winning easily. On 16 . . , 
K-Ql, Botwinnik would have obtained a quick 
victory by 17 QR-Q1 f FxKt; 18 RxPch, B-Q2; 
19 BxB, KtxB ; 20 KR-Ql, K-El ; 21 RxKt, QxR; 
22 RxQ, KxR; 23 Q-B5ch, K-K2; 24 Q-K5ch, 
K B1; 25 QxBP h and wins, as Black has no 
time to make use of both his Rooks. 

17 Kt-B5 Q-B3 

18 QR-Q1 P-KKt3 

The troublesome Knight had to be removed. 
If IS . . . P-B3, 19 R-QG! 

19 KtxP R-B1 22 B-K2 Kt^KtS 

20 P-Kt4 P-R3 23 Kt-Kt4 Q-QB3 

21 P-Kt5 Q-K3 24 Kt-B6ch K-K2 

Black is immobilized and does not succeed 
in developing his Q side. 


25 R-R7 B-B4 

26 P-K4 B-K3 

27 P-B5 Resigns 

White has so many threats that further re- 
sistance would have been useless. The game 
was exceptionally well played by Botwinnik. 


U. S, S. R. Championship 
Moscow, Sept* 9, 1940 
KING'S INDIAN DEFENSE 


(Notes by 3. 

V. Makogonov 
White 

1 P-Q4 Kt-KB3 

2 P-QB4 P-KK13 

3 Kt-QB3 B-Kt2 

7 P-Q5 

After the usual move, 
feared Pirc's system, 7 . 
an eventual „ . . P-Q4, 
gives Black the initiative. 

7 iii. 

8 Q-Q2 

9 KKt-K2 
10 Q-0-0 


Belavenetz) 

P. Keres 
Black 

4 P-K4 0-0 

5 B-K3 P-Q3 

6 P-B3 P-K4 

I i i 

KKbK2, Makogonov 
i PxP; 8 KtxP, and 
continuation which 

P-QR4 
Kt-R3 
Kt-B4 
Kt-KI 


Preparing the advance . . . P-B4, which is the 
only possibility of counter-play for Black. 

11 P-K Kt4 

In order to open the KKt file and gain 
ground for the attack, after the unavoidable 
. . , P-B4, 


11 ... . 

P-B4 

15 B-R3 

QBxB 

12 KtPxP 

PxP 

16 RxB 

K-R1 

13 B-Kt5 

B-B3 

17 QR.R1 

KR-Ktl 

14 P-KR4 

P-B5 

IS Kt-QI 

Q-K2 


19 Kt-B2! BxB 


Accepting the Pawn sacrifice is very risky, 
in view of the constant threats on the R file. 
Better would have been 19 . . . P-R.4, to pre- 
vent Kt-Kt4, Black's position would then have 
been quite strong, 

20 PxB R X P 

21 Kt-Kt4 .... 

Clearly the exchange of two Rooks for the 
Queen by means of 21 RxPch could only be 
to Black's advantage. 


Keres 



Makogorrov 

21 * * . . 


Kt-Q2? 





20 6 


The Chess Review 


Too passive, giving White the possibility, 
without any trouble, of strengthening his game. 
An interesting sacrifice of the exchange would 
enable Black to keep a position perfectly fit 
for defense, thus: 21 . . * RxKt; 22 PxR, Kt B3 
(bad is 22 . . + KtxP? because of 23 RxPch, 
QxR; 24 RxQch, KxR; 25 Q-B2) 23 Kt>B3, 
R-KKtl. Or 22 RxPch, QxR; 23 RxQch, KxR; 
24 PxR, Kt-B3, and Black has a Rook, Knight 
and Pawn for the Queen, with quite good pros- 
pects. 

22 Kt-Kt3 i 

The Knight is moved to the strong position 
on R5, for Black cannot play 22 . + . PxKt; 23 
RxPeh t QxR; 24 RxQch, KxR; 25 QxR. And 
if 22 . . . RxKt; 23 Kt-R5! followed by PxR. 

22 ... , QKt-B3 

23 Kt-B5 Q-B2 

24 Q-R2? .... 

This natural looking move should have al- 
lowed Keres to escape. Correct was 24 R~RG ! 
when Black is defenseless. If then 24 , . . 
KtxKt; 25 PxKt, Kt-R3; 26 Q-R2, threatening 
RxKt, etc. 

24 . . ♦ T P-R4 ! 

25 R-Ktl Q-Kt3 

26 Kt-K7 Q-B2 

27 Kt-B5 .... 

Seeing no way to make progress, White is 
now content with a draw. 

27 ... . R-Q1 

28 R-Kt2 Q-Kt3 

29 Kt-K7 Q-B2? 

But this loses immediately. Better would 
have been 29 , , + Q-Kt2; 30 Kt-B5, Q-Kt3, and 
the game is a draw. Black apparently paid no 
attention to the sly move 28 R-K12, after 
which the Rook will not be taken with check. 


30 KtxKt 


RxR 


31 RxPch K-Kt2 

32 QxRch K-B1 

33 Kt-Kt6ch K-Kt2 

34 KtxKFch Resigns 


Metropolitan Chess League 
Boston, 1940 

Unorthodox play f with Black getting the 
whip-hand early. 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 


H, Lyman 
White 


1 

P-K4 

P-QB4 

2 

Kt KB3 

Kt-QB3 

3 

KtB3 

P-K Kt3 

4 

P*Q4 

B-Kt2 

5 

P-Q5 

Kfc-K4 

6 

Kt-Q2 

P-Q3 

7 

P*B4 

Kt-Kt5 

3 

B-KtSch 

K-B1 

9 

Kt*Kt3 

P-KR4 

10 

P-KR3 

P-B5 

11 

BxP 

Q-B2 

12 

B-K2 

BxKtch 

13 

K-B1 

Q-Kt3 

14 

PxKt 

PxP 

15 

RxR 

P-Kt6 


H. B. Daly 

Black 


16 

RxKtch 

KxR 

17 

Kt-Q4 

BxKt 

18 

Q-Q3 

B-B7 

19 

P-B5 

B-Q2 

20 

P-R4 

K-Kt2 

21 

B-Kt4 

P-B3 

22 

K-K2 

R-R1 

23 

P-Kt3 

R-R5 

24 

K-B3 

B-Kt8 

25 

Q-B1 

PxP 

26 

PxP 

Q-Q5 

27 

B-B4 

BxP 

23 

QxB 

Q-K5ch 

29 

KxP 

RxBch 


Resigns 



Dallas Open Tournament 

An unorthodox gambit , Will this appear in 
Adams' new book ff Black to Play and Win?" 

IRREGULAR DEFENSE 


H. Ste 

iner 

W, W. 

Adams 

White 

Black 

1 K1-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

22 K-B5 

RxR 

2 P-Q4 

P-Q4 

23 Kt-Q6ch 

RxKt 

3 B-B4 

B-B4 

24 KxR 

R-K3ch 

4 P-B4 

P-K4 

25 K-Q5 

K*B2 

5 KtxP 

Kt-Kt5 

26 P-B5 

R-K8 

6 Kt-Q3 

BxKt 

27 P-KKt3 

Kt-Kt5ch 

7 PxB 

PxP 

28 K-B4 

Kt-B7 

8 PxP 

GxP! 

29 K-Q3 

Kt-K6 

9 QxQ 

Kt-B7ch 

30 B~K2 

RxR 

10 K-Q1 

KtxQ 

31 KxKt 

RxP 

11 BxP. 

Kt-K3 

32 P-QKt4 

P-KR4 

12 B-R5 

B-B4 

33 P-R4 

R-Kt7 

13 P-B3 

Kt-K2 

34 B-B4 

RxP 

14 Kt-Q2 

Kt-B3 

35 BxP 

P-R5 

15 B-B3 

0-0-0 

36 K-B2 

R-Kt4 

16 K-B2 Kt(B)-Q5ch 

37 B-K6 

R-K4 

17 BxKt 

Ktx Bch 

38 B-Kt4 

P-K Kt4 

18 K-B3 

KR-K1 

39 P-R5 

P-R3 

19 Kt-K4 

B-B1 

40 B-R5 

R-B4 

20 R-Q1 

B-Kt5ch ! 

41 B-Kt4 

R-B5 

21 KxB 

Kt-B3ch 

Resigns 



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An Idea in the Ruy Lopez 

By E. Rabinovich 


The following game, played in Margate 
1937, gave me the idea of making a detailed 
analysis of a certain continuation in the Ruy 
Lopez, which is considered at present to be 
inferior, 


RUY LOPEZ 


Sir G. A, Thomas P, Keres 

White Black 


1 

P-K4 

P-K4 

14 Q-K2 

0-0-0 

2 

Kt-KB3 

Kt-QB3 

15 0-0 

B-Q3 

3 

B-Kt5 

P-QR3 

16 Kt* Kt4 

Q-B4 

4 

B-R4 

Kt-B3 

17 P-Q3 

Kt-Kt4 

5 

Kt-B3 

P-Q Kt4 

18 Kt-R4 

Q-Q4 

6 

B-Kt3 

P-Q3 

19 P-QB4 

Kt-R6ch 

7 

Kt-Kt5 

P-Q4 

20 K-R1 

G-R4 

8 

KtxQP 

Kt“Q5! 

21 P-B5 

KR-K1 

9 

Kt-K3 

KtxB 

22 Q-B2 

QxKt{R5) 

10 

RPxKt 

P-R3 

23 PxB 

BxPch 

11 

Kt-B3 

KtxP 

24 KxB 

QxKtch 

12 

13 

KtxP 

Kt-B3 

Q-B3 

B-Kt2 

25 K-R 1 

Q*B6 mate 


The question arises whether the continua- 
tion of 5 . . - P-QKt4 and 6 . . . P-Q3 is 
applicable to the main variation of the Ruy 
Lopez, thus; 

1 P-K4 P-K4 4 B-R4 Kt-B3 

2 Kt-KB3 Kt-QB3 & 0-0 P-QKt4 

3 B-Kt5 P-QR3 6 B-Kf3 P-G3 


In this position Black threatens to exchange 
the WB by playing . . . Kt-QR4, e. g. 

7 R*K1 KLQR4 

3 P-Q4 KtxB 

9 RPxKt Kt-Q2 


with an even game. 

White has three methods of meeting the 
threat; 

I 7 Kt-Kt5, which seems to be the most 
natural way, 

II 7 P-B3, with the object of obtaining 
the normal Tchigorin formation after 7 * . , 
B-K2, 


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III 7 P-QR4 

We shall consider each of these continua- 
tions, 

I 

7 Kt-Kt5 P-Q4 

8 PxP Kt-Q5l 

Black 



White 


There are a number of possibilities available 
for White which merit discussion. 


(A) 9 P-QB3 

KtxB 

10 Q or PxKt 

QxP 

and to say the least Black has no difficulties. 

(B) 9 P-Q6 

KtxB 

10 PxP 

QxBP 

11 RPxKt 

P-R3 

12 Kt-KB3 

P-K5 

when Black has positional compensation for 

the Pawn minus. 


(C) 9 Kt-KB3 

KtxB 

10 RPxKt 

P-K5 

11 R-K1 

B-K2 

followed by . , . QxP ■ 

with advantage for 

Black. 

■ 

(D) 9 Kt-QB3 

KtxB 

10 RPxKt 

P-Kt5 

11 QKtK4 

KtxKt 

12 KtxKt 

QxP 

13 Q-B3 

B-Kt2 

14 Kt-Kt5 

■a ■ -■ * 

and according to Iglitzky ( 

"64/* Sept 19, 1939), 

tlie chances after the exchange of Queens are 

approximately even. One can hardly envy 

White’s position after: 


14 . . , , 

QxG 

15 KtxG 

P-K5 

16 R-K 1 

B-K2 

with u choice of castling 

in either direction. 

(E) 9 R-K1 

B^Q B4 

A game Osmolowski vs. 

Dzagurov continued: 

10 RxPch 

- * + * 

If 10 F-QB3* KtxB; 11 

PxKt, 0-0, and 12 

RxP will not do because 

of . , . Kt-Kt5! 


207 



208 


The Chess Review 


10 ... . K-B1 

Threatening now 11 * „ . Kt-Kt5 or . . . 
Kt-Q2. 


11 P-KR3 Kt-Q2 15 RPxKt QxPch 

12 KtxBP Q-B3 1 16 K-R2 B-K Kt5 ! 

13 KtxR KtxR 17 Q-R1 Kt-B6 mate 

14 P-Q3 KtxB 

If White does not play 10 RxPch, Black 
will regain the Pawn with an excellent game. 
{F) 9 Q-K 1 .... 

This was tried in a game Bogatyrchuk vs. 
Dzagurov, which went: 

9 . . . . B-QB4 

10 QxPch . . , . 


Better was 10 F-QB3, KtxB; 11 QxPch, B-K2; 
12 PxKt, O-O, although Black, with the threats 
of 13 . . . KbKt5 and . . . B-Q3, has a power- 
ful attack for the Pawn. 


10 , ( t , K-B1 

11 P-QB3 .... 

If 11 KtKE3, Kt-Kt5 ; 12 Q-Kl, KtxKlch; 
13 PxKt, Q-R5; 14 PxKt, QxKtPch; 15 K-Rl, 
Q-B6ch; 16 K-Ktl, B-R6, and mate follows. 
Or 11 F-Q3, Kt-Kt5; 12 Q-Kl, Q-Q3; 13 P-K13, 
F-R3; 14 Kt-K4 t Kt-B6ch; 15 K-Rl, Q-KK13; 
16 Q-K2, Q-R4 ; 17 P-KR4, KtxRF, and Black 
wins. 


11 ... . 

Kt-KtS 

12 KtxBP 

Q-R5 

13 QxBP 

Kt-K7ch 

14 K-R1 

QxBP 

Pretty and forceful, though the simple 

. . . KtxFch; 15 RxKt, QxR 

was equally i 

cisive, as White soon runs 

out of checks 

15 QxKBch 

QxQ 

16 P-Q4 

Q*K2 

17 KtxRch 

K-K 1 

18 Kt-Q2 

Q-R5 

19 P-KR3 

Q-Kt6 

Resigns 



It is apparent therefore that 7 Kt-Kt5 is 
at least of doubtful value. 

II 

To come back to the original position, dia- 
grammed below: 


Black 



White 

7 P-B3 


After this move White is not the master 
of the position, as is usually the case in the 
Tchlgorin Defense. Besides 7 . . . B-K2, which 
could lead to the normal line after 8 R-Kl, 
Kt-QR4; 9 B-B2, FB4, etc,, Black has two ad- 
ditional continuations: 

(A) 7 . . . . B-Kt5 

8 P-Q3 

In the attempt to drive off the Bishop by 
P-KR3 and P-Kt4, White must consider the fact 
that Black has not yet castled. If 3 P-Q4, 
PxP; 9 PxP, BxKt; 10 PxB, Q-Q2 t with the 
threat of ♦ , . Q-R6. 

8 , . , . B-K2 

8 , , . Q-Q2 is also not bad. 

9 P-KR3 B-R4 

10 QKt-Q2 0-0 

11 R-K1 .... 

Preparing the manoevre Kt-Bl, PKt4, and 
Kt-Kt3 or Kt : K3, but White never realizes 
this plan. 


11 

a m * ■ 

P-Q4! 

12 

PxP 

KtxP 

13 

P-Kt4 

B-Kt3 

14 

KtxP 

KtxKt 

15 

RxKt 

Kt-B5 

16 

Kt-B3 

V V ■ V 


There is nothing better available, 


16 , 
17 R-Q5 


KtxQP 

B-Q3! 


The position is clearly advantageous for 
Black. 


(B) 


7 . ■ ■ ■ 

8 B-B2 


Kt-QR4 

P-B4 


Other possibilities are 8 . . P-B3 and 8 
. . . P-KL3, which might be worth trying in 
practical play. 


9 P-Q4 Q-B2 

and now if 10 R-Kl or 10 QKt-Q2 ? Black can 
play 10 . . , P-Kt3 and , , . B-Kt2. If 10 
B-Kt5, either 10 , * . B-K2, or 10 , . , Kt-Q2 fol- 
lowed by , . « P-Kt3* Black will always be a 
little better off than in the more usual vari- 
ations. 


Ill 


7 P-QR4 

8 PxP 

9 RxR 
10 P-B3 


B-Kt5 

PxP 

QxR 

B-K2 


Also plausible is 10 , . . P-Kt3, and if 11 
P-R3, B Q2 ; 12 Kt-KtS, Kt-Ql. 


11 Q-K2 


B-Q2! 


and Black has an excellent game. 

It is of course premature to conclude from 
this analysis that the Ruy Lopez is refuted. 
Undoubtedly White s play can be improved 
at different points. However, the system of 
Blacks development herein indicated is of 
considerable interest. 


(Translated from ft Schakmaii }i by /, K J 




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Name 

Address 


Problem Department 

By Vincent L, Eaton 

Address all correspondence relating to this department to V.L. Eaton, 223 7 Q Street, N.W., Washington, D.C . 
Questions About Problem Matters Will Be Answered If Accompanied Bv Return Postage, 


The Solutions section and Solvers' Ladder 
are omitted this month because of the limita- 
tions on our space imposed by the printing 
of the Annual Index and other special material. 
They will be given in full in the January issue, 

* K * * * 

It is traditional for Chess problem depart- 
ments to “let down the bars’' a bit at Christmas- 
time and devote some of their diagrams to 
unusual and unorthodox compositions. Gener- 
ally they are stunt problems* involving such 
devices as promotion to pieces of the opposite 
color, en passant captures without retrograde 
analysis, and the like. Just how and why this 
custom has grown up I don't exactly know, I 
expect it has been because editors have felt 
the need of giving their solvers a bit of holiday 
fun, and wished to celebrate a very special 
occasion by something quite out of the or- 
dinary. 

Unfortunately, lew such “Christmas prob- 
lems” are of really high merit in themselves; 
conceived as stunts, they have interest for 
the solver only insofar as they illustrate some- 
thing particularly contrary to his Chess sense 
and Chess thinking. Most of the monstrosities 
brought out each year are merely repetitions 
of ideas that were long ago worn threadbare, 

I am speaking, as I say, of the run-of-the-mill 
" Christmas problem,” not of Fairy Chess, 
which constitutes a very large and important 
field of composing activity. The true practi- 
tioner of Fairy Chess does not regard the use 
of unorthodox pieces or self-made rules as an 
end in itself; he looks upon it as a means to 
an end, which is the expression of a theme. 
He does not, for example, pose a situation 
wherein a White Pawn promotes to a piece 
of an opposite color unless this stratagem 
illustrates some pretty idea; he does not in- 
troduce Grasshoppers or Nighlriders or Camels 
or the rest of his menagerie unless they have 
some definite and necessary function. This, 
then, is the distinction between the “Christmas 
problem" as one usually finds it and the true 
“Fairy Chess composition”: that in the first, 
the stunt is generally all that matters, while in 
the second the stunt is subordinate to the 
problem idea. 

¥ * ¥ # * 

No. 1736 exemplifies a very popular type of 


Fairy problem; the “help-mate,” one of Sam 
Loyd's many ingenious inventions. In a “help- 
mate,” Black does not try to keep White from 
mating; instead, he docs all he can to get 
himself mated. The following will make the 
difference more clear: 

(By V, L. E. p impromptu) BB(>, S, 8, 
2K4R, 8, 8, SPSlpP, 7k. 

Here White has a “direct-mate” in two by 
1 Re5; i , e,, this move works against any 
Black defense (in this case, there is only one — 

1 . . . KxP, upon which 2 Rh5 mate occurs) * 
Suppose, however, the White Knight were 
omitted and the condition was “help-mate in 
two,” Since by these terms Black must col- 
laborate in getting himself mated, the solution 
would be 1 Ed 5, Pgl becoming Bishop ch; 

2 Rd4 mate. The astute solver will observe 
that if Black were playing according to direct- 
mate strategy, he could prevent this conclusion 
by playing 1 . . . Kgl or 1 , . , Pgl becoming 
some other piece than a Bishop. 

In Mr. Tauber’s clever No. 1736 — another 
of his studies in board-rim strategy— White 
moves first and Black responds with such in- 
tent toward suicide that White’s fourth move 
is mate. 

We shall welcome good Fairy contributions 
all year round, and shall publish them as 
space permits, though they will be kept separ- 
ate from the regular Ladder offerings because 
of their un familiarity to most solvers, 

# * # at * 

Nos. 1735-1743 are designed to provide holi- 
day diversion and have been especially selected 
because of some striking and amusing element 
in their solutions. No. 1735 has an unconven- 
tional but not unorthodox key, and No, 1736 
has inverse mechanism of the type explained 
above; but all nine problems depend on straight 
Chess moves, without any “Christmas stunts,” 
Mr. Mowry very kindly sent us No. 1727, an 
unpublished work by our good friend, the late 
W. I, Kennard, suggested by the masterly No. 
1724. No. 1722 introduces to the Review one 
of the foremost Brazilian composers, and il- 
lustrates a theme which Dr, Monteiro da Sil- 
veira recently discussed in the British Chess 
Magazine, 

To all of you, best wishes for a very merry 
Christmas and a joyful New Year! 



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Mate in 2 


No, 1718 

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Mate in 2 


No, 1719 

NICHOLAS GABOR 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



Mate in 2 


Original Section 

No. 1720 

DR, J. HANSEN 


Copenhagen, Denmark 



Mate in 2 


No. 1721 

DR. P, G, KEENEY 
Bellevue, Ky, 



Mate in 2 


No, 1722 

DR, MONTEIRO DA SILVEIRA 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 



Mate in 2 


No, 1723 

FRED SPRENGER 
New York, N. Y. 



Mate in. 2 


No, 1724 

F. W, WATSON 

Toronto, Canada 



Mate in 2 


No, 1725 


THE PROBLEM EDITOR 



Mate in 8 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE JANUARY 15th, 1941 




















212 


T H E C HESS R E V I E W 


Original Section (contra) 


No. 172-6 

DR, G. ERDOS 
Vienna, Austria 



Mate In 3 


No, 1727 

The late W. L KENNARD 
(Unpublished) 



Mate in 3 


No, 1723 

l-L C. MOWRY 
Malden* Mass, 



Mate in 3 


No. 172-9 

H. C. MOWRY 
Malden, Mass* 



Mate In 3 


No, 1730 

AUREL TAUBER 

New York, N. Y. 



Mate in 3 


No, 1731 

THOMAS S. McKENNA 
Lima, Ohio 



Mate in 4 


No, 1732 

THE PROBLEM EDITOR 
“Cat and Mouse” 



Mate in 7 


No. 1733 

R W* WATSON 
Toronto* Canada 



SELF- mate in 2 


No. 1734 

F. W. WATSON 


Toronto, Canada 



SELF-mate in 2 


SOLUTIONS TO THESE PROBLEMS ARE DUE JANUARY 15th, 1941 
















December, 1940 


213 


Quoted Section 


No. 1735 

NICHOLAS GABOR 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Original 


'i 

M BIB ■ 



n 

Sllf^fll H 

# 

§§§ life 1H ft §1 

|§§ 

B H t J 

■ 



Mate in 2 


No. 1736 

AUREL TAUBER 
New York, N. Y. 
Original 



HELP- mate in 4 


No. 1737 

G, F. ANDERSON 


Natal Mercury, 1915 



SELF-mate in 4 


No* 1738 
J* DE KONING 
Canadian Courier, 1916 



Mate in 3 


No. 1739 
J. HARTONG 
First Prize, Western 
Morning News, 1922 



Mate in 2 


No. 1740 

SAM LOYD 
American Chess Nuts, 
1863 



Mate in 3 


No. 1741 

V. MARIN 
First Prize, Norwich 
Mercury, 1903-G4 



Mate in 3 


No. 1742 

H, C, MOWRY 

Boston Transcript, 
Aug. 23, 1934 



Mate in 3 


No, 1743 

H. WEENINK 
Swiss Chess Review, 
Nov., 1919 



Mate in 3 


THESE PROBLEMS ARE NOT SCORED ON THE SOLVERS 1 LADDER. 

















214 


This Chess Review 


Annual Index 

ARTICLES AIM D FEATURES 

A, C, F, Yearbook (Sturgis) : 91 
An Idea in the Ruy Lopez (Rabinovich) : 207 
Cage of the King's Shadow (Cbauvenet.) : 153 
Chernov's Chess Corner: G3 
Chess at Dallas (Sturgis) : 146 
Chess Masters Beware! (Koltanowski) : 60 
Famous Last Round Tourney Thrills (Little) : 
10, 39, 181 

First Steps (Purdy): 18 
Harold M. Phillips (Horowitz): 154 
John F. Barry (Sturgis): 82 
Keres-Euwe Match (Reinfeld) ; 27 
Modern Chess Dull?! (Reinfeld): 32, 109 
Moscow Chess Tournament (Maizelis): 197 
My Best Came o i Chess (Fine) : 200 
My Favorite Endgame Compositions (Cher- 
nev) : 42 

New Ground in the Grunfeld Defense (Yudo- 
vich) : 127 

New Life for the Alekhine-Chatard Attack 
(Silich): 3 

New York State Tournament (Brand): 155 
President's Message (Sturgis): 2 
Sixty Two-Movers of the Past Sixty Years 
(White): 92, 115, 139, 163, 187 
Under-Promotion in the Endgame (Chernev) : 
184 

IL S, Championship (Stephens) : 26 
U. S. of A. Chess Federation (Mitchell): 52 
Women in Chess (Weart) : 31* 81, 103 
Would You Have Seen It? (Chernev): 13, 106 

BOOK REVIEWS 

100 Chess Gems (Wenman): 12 

1939 Ventnor City Tournament (Reinfeld) : 38 
White to Play and Win (Adams) : 64 
Practical Endgame Play (Reinfeld) : 64 
Among These Mates (Chielamangus) : 84 
How to Play Chess Endings (Znosko-Eorow- 

ski): 84 

Keres-Euwe Match (Buschke): 113 
Yearbook of the U, S. ol A. Chess Federation 
(Barnes and Reinfeld): 133 
Meet the Masters (Euwe) : 133 
Fifty Two-Move Problems (Wenman): 133 

1940 Ventnor City Tournament (Dessauer) : 194 

DIAGRAMMED STUDIES 

Frydman vs, Kashdan; 14 
Flo hr vs. Keres: 14 
Yates vs. Schlechter: 48 
Bernstein vs. Fine: 54 
DiiBors vs* Neuss: 104, 105 
Santasiere vs* Soudakoff: 160 
Capablanca vs* Nimzovitch: 186 
Alekhine vs. Thomas: 186 

OPENINGS 

Albin Counter-Gambit: 136, 202 
Alekhine's Defense: 35, 149, 180 
Bird's Opening: 96 

Bishop’s Opening: 35, 80, 85, 147, 152, 168 

Budapest Defense: 194 

Cambridge Springs Defense: 7 . t 

Cafo-Kann Defense: 5, 53, 84, 87 

Catalan System: 176 

Center Counter Defense: 89 

Colle System: 37, 126 

Danish Gambit: 13, 172 

Dutch Defense: 16, 51, 83, 150 

English Opening: 55, 57, 123, 770, 192, 204 


Four Knights Game: 8 

French Defense: 5, 17, 17, 31, 36, 40, 58, 61, 
75, 86, 99, 107, 113, 160, 175, 177, 200 
Giuoeo Piano: 129, 181 

Grunfeld Defense: 7, 16, 88, 98, '} 28, 128, 145, 

1 52, 156 

Irregular Defense: 96, 206 

King's Indian Defense: 43, 151, 157, 205 

Max Lange Attack: 34 

Moller Attack: 173 

Muzio Gambit: 51 

Nimzo-Indian Defense: 17, 27, 31, 37, 59, 65 
Nimzovitch Defense: 122, 204 
Petroff Defense : 74, 100 
Queen's Gambit: 50, 61, 75, 125 
Queen's Gambit Declined: 4, 7, 10, 12* 17, 29* 
35, 56, 57, 57, 59, 88, 96, 124, 135, 138, 147, 
148, 148* 158, 162, 168, 175, 180, 183, 194 ■ 
Queen's Indian Defense: 16, 16, 75, 101, 104, 
112* 162 

Queen’s Knight's Opening: 202 
Queen’s Pawn Counter-Gambit: 108 
Queen’s Pawn Opening: 88, 99* 161 
Reti Opening: 43, 90 

Ruy Lopez: 35, 51, 66, 74, 87* 90* 102, 120, 134, 
135, 151, 154, 154, 159, 178, 179, 180* 133* 196, 
207 

Scotch Gambit: 132 

Sicilian Defense: 34, 35, 50, 50* 57, 58, 61, 74, 
79* 83* 88, 88, 101* 111, 125* 128, 130* 131, 
137, 139* 146, 151, 161* 171, 195* 206 
Slav Defense: 177 
Stonewall System: 203 
Three Knights Game: 87 
TWo Knights Defense: 35, 78 
Vienna Game: 43 

PLAYERS 

(Asterisks indicate annotated games) 
Abrahams, G. vs. Flohr 7* Cukierman 16 
Adams, E, B. vs. Levy 96 

Adams, W. W* vs. Ghauvenet 51, Simonson 80*, 
Kashdan 99*, Morris 125*, Green 130*. 
Kendall 147, Polland 151, Seidman 180* 
Woliston 204** H* Steiner 206 
Ahues, C. vs. Stahlberg 7* 

Alalortzev, A. vs. Levenflsch 176* 

Alekhine, Dr, A, vs. Radzinsky 9, Mikenas 37* 
Angel* T, vs, Buschke 149 
Ardid, Dr* R, R, vs. Mieses 5* 

Atkins, H* E, vs, Barry 83 

Avram, H. vs. Fulop 16* Denker 34** Simonson 
43 

Axe, E. W* vs, Cobb and Sage 50 

Barcza, G. vs. Szabo 128 

Barry, J. F* vs. Atkins 83, Em. Lasker 83 * 

Battell, J. S, vs. Reinfeld 75 

Be harry vs. Hartlaub 12* 

Belavenets, S, vs, Lilienthal 180 
Bernstein, S* N* vs. Marshall 57* Em. Lasker 57, 
Friend 75, Hanauer 96, Littman 101*, * 
Morris 122*, Resbevsky 129*, Polland 150* 
Blum, M. vs. Milner-Barry 50 
Blumin, B, vs. Tenner 35, Soudakoff 59, Mott- 
Smit.h 85** Phillips 154, Santasiere 156* 
Botwinnik, M* vs, Levenfisch 204* 

Brunnemer, J, W, vs, Failing 171* 

Burdge, H. vs. Elo 147 
Buschke, Dr. A. vs. Angel 149 
Capablanca, J, R, vs. Eliskases 181* 

Castillo vs, Tarlakower 175* 

C ha rouse k, R. vs. Maroczy 107* 

Chauvenet, L. R. vs. W. Adams 51 


DECEMBiiit, 1940 


215 


Chernev, I. vs, Denker 7 

Cru z, Dr, W. O. vs. Trompowsky 138, Hago 158* 

Cukierman, Dr. J. vs. Abrahams 16 

Daly, H. B. vs. Lyman 206 

Danielsson, G. vs. Reed ISO 

Davidson vs. Soultanbeief 16 

Davis, Dr. R* S. vs. Walker 172* 

Denker, A. S. vs. Chernev 7 , Avram 34 *, Plata 
35, Pinkus 88, Polland 132* 

Dickson, R* IV1. vs, Harris 89 
Drmock, E* vs, Hogenauer 195* 

Doesbungh, G. R. van vs. Euwe 120* 

Donovan, J. vs, Santasiere 124* 

Edwards, H. vs. Nield 202* 

Eliskases, E. vs. Capablanca 181* 

Elo, A, vs. Roddy 146, Burdge 147, Thompson 
183 

Enevoldeon vs, Keres 17 
Euwe, Dr. M. vs, Landau 4*, 5*, 61* 61* t Keres 
27*, 29*, 65*, 66, 90*, 90*, 112*, 134*, 135, 
van Doesburgh 120* 

Failing, W. H. vs. Bmnnemer 171* 

Fajans* H. vs, Levine 88 
Farber, Dr. L vs. Rasis 194 
Feigin, M* vs. Szabo 145 
Feldman, J, vs. Jackson 8, Tenner 58 
Fine, R. vs. Hanauer 53*, Green 56*, Reshevsky 
78*, Kupchik 79*, Moskowitz 87* Seidman 
96, 101** Simonson 102, Roddy 148** Mor- 
gan 170, Flohr 200* 

Finkel stein, M* vs. Seidman 84 
Flo hr* S* vs. Abrahams 7, Fine 200* 

Friedman, A. L* vs, Steinfeld 57 
Friend, B* vs. Bernstein 75 
Fulop, J. vs. Avram 16 
Gardner, L, W, vs. Steckel 162 
Grau T R. vs. Guimard 177* 

Green, M. vs, Hanauer 55*, Fine 56* t Heilman 
88, W, Adams 130* 

Guimard, C* E. vs. Prins 17, Grau 177* 

Quid in vs. Kovner 179* 

Hago, M* D. vs. Cruz 158*, Ulvestad 160 
Hallman, D. A* vs. Winkler 74 
Hanauer* M, L. vs. Fine 53*, Green 55*, Bern- 
stein 96, Santasiere 123*, Woliston 168, 
Seidman 192 

Harris, J. vs. Dickson 89 

Hartlaub vs, Beharry 12*, Testa 12* 

Heilman, G. vs r Green 88 
Hernandez, N. vs. McClure 196* 

Hogenauer, N, J* vs. Dimock 195* 

Horowitz, I. A. vs. Roddy 138 

Jackson, E. S, vs. Feldman 8, Soudakoff 35, 
Santasiere 161 
Johnson vs. Seiler 35 
Karffj Miss N* May vs, Rivero 104 
Kashdan, I. vs. Planas 35, Paz 36*, W, Adams 
99*, Kupchik 100*, Reshevsky 151* 

Kendall, W. N. vs. W. Adams 147 
Keres, P. vs, Enevoldson 17* Euwe 27* 29* 

65*, 66, 90*, 90*, 112** 134*, 135, Sachsen- 
maier 173* Makogonov 205*, Thomas 207 
Klein, E« vs. Landau 37* 

Kmoch, H* vs. Prins 128 
Koenig, I. vs, Solomon 31 
Kollnick vs* Schur 51 
Koitanowskf, G* vs, Sturgis 126 
Korpanty, J. vs* Platz 135 

Kupchik, A. vs. Fine 79*, Reshevsky 87, Paitos 
88, Kashdan 100*, Simonson 152 


Landau, S, vs* Euwe 4* T 5*, 61, 61*. Klein 37* 
Lasker, Ed. vs* Seidman 137* 

Lasker, Dr. Em* vs* Bernstein 57, Barry 83* 
Leary, J. J* vs. Ruth 113 

Levenfi'sch, G. vs. Rabinovich lip, Alatortzev 
176*, Botwinnik 204* 

Levine, D, vs. Fajans 88 

Levy, N* vs, E, Adams 96 

Lilienthal, A. vs^ Belavenets 180 

Littman, G* vs. Bernstein 101*, Reinfeld 131* 

Luckis, M. vs* Raud 175* 

Lundholm, S* vs*-SpieImann 202* 

Lundin, E* vs, Raud 17 
Lyman, H. vs. Daly 206 
Makogonov, V* vs* Keres 205* 

Maroczy, G. vs. Charousek 107*, Zambelly 108* 
Marshall, F, J. vs. Santasiere 16, Polland 43, 
Bernstein 57, Rogosin 128 
Mattison, H* vs, Spielmann 40* 

McClure, J, vs. Hernandez 196* 

McCormick, E. T, vs* Morris 125 
Mieses, J* vs, Ardid 5* 

Mikenas, V* vs, Alekhine 37* 

Milner- Barry, P* S, vs, Ritson Morry 31, Blum 
50 

Morgan, D. L. vs, Fine 170 

Morris, H* vs* Bernstein 122*, McCormick 125, 
W T Adams 125*, Ulvestad 162 
Moskowitz, J, vs, Pinkus 35, Fine 87 
Mott-Smith, K, O. vs. Blumin 85* 

Murdock, W. vs, Soudakoff 74 
Neckermann, M. vs. Willman 88 
Nield, A. E* vs. Edwards 202* 

Partos, J* vs. Kupchik 88 
Paz vs. Kashdan 36* 

Phillips, H* M. vs. Tenner 154, Blumin 154, 
Santasiere 161, Willman 178* 

Pilnick, C* vs. Towsen 194 
Pinkus, A. S. vs. Moskowitz 35, Saltzberg 74, 
Smirka 86*. Denker 88, Reshevsky 98* 
Planas, F. vs* Kashdan 35 

Platz, Dr* J. vs. Denker 35, Simonson 58*, 
Korpanty 135 

Polland, D* vs. Marshall 43, Denker 132*, Bern- 
stein 150*, W. Adams 151 
Prins, L* vs* Guimard 17, Sierra 17, Kmoch 128 
Purdy, C. J* S. vs. L. Steiner 177* 

Rabinovich, E. vs. Levenftsch 111* 

Basis, C, vs. Farber 194 

Baud, I. vs. Lundin 17, Luckis 175* 

Reed, H. vs. Daniels son 180 
ReinfeJd, F. vs* Amateur 51, Santasiere 57, 
Battell 75, Ulvestad 99*. Littman 131.*, 
Reshevsky 152 


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216 


The Chess Review 


Reshevsky, S. vs. Allies 43, Fine 78*, Kupchik 
87, Pinkus 98*, Bernstein 129*, Kaslidan 
151*, Reinfeld 152 

Ritson Morry, W. vs. Milner-Barry 31, Thomas 
50 

Rivero, Mrs. A. vs. Karff 104 

Roddy T A. vs. Horowitz 1 3 S N Elo 145, Fine 148* 

Ragosin, H. vs, Marshall 128 

Rosza, B. vs. H, Steiner 148 

Rovner vs. Ouldin 170* 

Ruth, W. A. vs. Leary 113 
Ruyter, A. J. de vs. Snoep 6! 

Sachsenmaier, F. vs. Keres 173* 

Saltzberg, M. vs, Pinkus 74 
Santasiere, A. E. vs. Marshall 16, Reini'etd 57, 
Sobin 87*, Hanauer 123*, Donovan 124*, 
Blumin 120*, Phillips 161, Jackson 161, 
Stephens 203* 

Saunders, Miss E. vs. Amateur 168 
Sehur vs. Kollniek 51 

Seidman, H. vs. Ulvestad 75, FInkelstein 84, 
Fine 96, 101*, Ed, Lasker 137*, W. Adams 
180, Hanauer 192 
Seiter, D. vs. Johnson 35 
S ha! ns wit, G. vs. Tenner 59, Woliston 151* 
Sierra, J. J. vs. Prins 17 

Simonson, A. G. vs. Tenner 34, Avram 43, Platz 
58*, W. Adams 80*, Fine 102, Kupchik 152 
Smirka, R. vs, Pinkus 86* 

Snoep, A, vs, de Ruyter 61 
Sobin, B. vs. Santasiere 37* 

Solomon, J, D, vs. Koenig 31 
Soudakoff, J. vs. Jackson 35, Blumin 59, Mur- 
dock 74, Ulvestad 1.57*, Willman 159* 
Souitanbeief vs. Davidson 16 
Spielmarm, R. vs. Mattison 40*, Lundholm 202* 
Stahl berg, G, vs. Ahues 7* 

Steckel, W. H, vs. Gardner 162 
Steiner, H. vs, Woliston 136, Rosza 148, Thomp- 
son 183, W. Adams 206 
Steiner, L. vs. Purdy 177* 

Steinfeld, S. vs. Friedman 57 
Stephens, L. W, vs, Santasiere 203*' 

Sturgis, G. vs, Koltanowski 126 
Szabo, L. vs. Barcza 128, Feigin 145 


Tarrasch, Dr. S, vs. Walbrodt 10* 

Tarlakower, Dr, S, vs, Castillo 175* 

Tenner, O. vs. Simonson 34, Blumin 35, Feld- 
man 58, Shainswit 59, Phillips 154 
Testa vs, Hartlaub 12* 

Thomas, Sir G. A. vs. Ritson Morry 50, Keres 
207 

Thompson, J. C, vs, Elo 183, H. Steiner 183 
Towsen, A. 1\L vs. Pilnick 194 
Trompowsky, O. vs. Cruz 138 
Ulvestad, O, vs. Seidman 75, Reinfeld 99*, 
Soudakoff 157*, II ago 160, Morris 162 
Walbrodt, C, A. vs. Tarrasch IQ* 

Walker, P. J. vs, Davis 172* 

Willman, R. vs. Neckermann 88, Soudakoff 159*, 
Phillips 178* 

Winkler, B. vs. Hallman 74 

Woliston, P. vs. H. Steiner 136, Shainswit 151*, 
Hanauer 168, W. Adams 204* 
TOURNAMENTS AND MATCHES 
Boston Championship: 89 
Brazilian Championship: 138 
Bronx County Championship: 57, 114, 194 
California: North vs. South Match, 138 
Canadian Championship: 194 
Central Indiana Chess Association: 128 
Commercial Chess League of N. Y.; 63, 186 
Correspondence Chess Tournament: 171, 195 
Dallas Open Tournament: 146 
District of Columbia Championship: 89 
Havana Tournament: 25 
Keres-Euwe Match: 27, 65, 90, 112, 134 
Manhattan Chess Club Championship: 34, 58 
Manhattan- Mar shall Match: 85 
Marshall Chess Club Championship: 53 
Massachusetts State Championship: 89 
Missouri Championship: 170 
New York State Tournament: 155 
Pennsylvania Championship: 1.13, 135, 161 
Southern Chess Association: 126 
S t e i n e r- W ol i s ton M a tc h : 13 6 
St. Louis Championship: 89 
Texas. Chess Association: 183 
U. S. Championship: 26, 51, 74, 98, 129, 150 
Utah State Tourney: 170 
Ventnor City Tournament: 62, 12 1, 168 
West Virginia Championship: 113 


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2.00 

1900 

Munich— Marco, Schlechter 




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3,00 

1900 

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1902 

Hanover 

Ger. 

3.00 

1904 

Cambridge Springs — 

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1.50 

1905 

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1916 

Riga Cor res, Matches — Eng. 

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1921 

Berlin — Kagan 

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1921 

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1923 Frankfurt Ger. 1,50 

1927 New York Rus. 2.50 

1931 Prague ^ Hung. 1.00 

1932 Grosse Fernturnier ... Ger. 3.50 

1935 Barcelona — Koltanowski ^Fr, L25 

1935 Warsaw Team Tour.— Reinfeld 

Eng. 2,00 

1936 Nottingham — Alekhine Eng. 5.00 

1940 Ventnor City Eng. 1.25 

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1934 Alekhine-Bogoljubov __Eng. .60 

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